Ornery.org
  Front Page   |   About Ornery.org   |   World Watch   |   Guest Essays   |   Contact Us

The Ornery American Forum Post New Topic  Post A Reply
my profile login | register | search | faq | forum home

  next oldest topic   next newest topic
» The Ornery American Forum » General Comments » Another example of parental stupidity...

 - UBBFriend: Email this page to someone!    
Author Topic: Another example of parental stupidity...
scouser1
unregistered


 - posted            Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Total and utter silliness

Not only could they have drowned, but they also could have been snatched by anyone.

And still, not action taken against the mother, sending out the wrong vibe to people. Leave your kids anywhere and you wont get them taken off you, AND you wont get prosecuted!

IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
mdgann
Member
Member # 2572

 - posted      Profile for mdgann   Email mdgann   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
It is definitely a different society in the UK. Or at least was. Back in the 80s while living in East Anglia, it was common to go to any small downtown shopping area and see prams with babies in them parked outside of shops with the mothers or fathers inside shopping. The first time we saw it, my wife wanted to stay by the pram until the parent returned, but it soon became apparent that this would be uncalled for and unwanted. We did not see the same thing on a visit in 2001, so attitudes and actions may have changed. Too bad that it was probably necessary.
Posts: 116 | Registered: Aug 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
scifibum
Member
Member # 945

 - posted      Profile for scifibum   Email scifibum   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
I'm angry at the mother, and would certainly have let her have it if I was there to confront her when she returned. However, I'm not sure I would want her prosecuted, if she displayed appropriate regret and anguish. I'm talking about significant wailing and self flagellation (verbal flagrum is OK, I guess). If she did that I might think the lesson was sufficiently learned.

It's unclear from the article. It sounds as if she might have been unrepentant. If that was the case then the children should have been removed from her custody; it's only a matter of time before they are dead, kidnapped, or severely abused by someone because she doesn't understand they require some supervision.

Posts: 5611 | Registered: Mar 2003  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
scouser1
unregistered


 - posted            Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Since the days of Jamie Bulger, you NEVER leave your children. You just do not do it under any cirumstances. Madelieine McCann's parents also learnt that too late, and she was snatched from a room in a house.

The water was up to the kid's necks before they were even seen by coastguards. Not to mention the fact that they were only 4 and 5.
Its totally wrong and instead of giving her her kids back so she can try and leave them somewhere else, they should have done something about her. Maybe she has MuncheausenBP and just did it for attention I dont know. But leaving 2 young children while you go shopping is not something you do unless you have a screw loose.

And while this woman leaves her kids willie-nilly, others die becuse they cant imagine a life without theirs.

Parents commit suicide after the loss of their son.

IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
TomDavidson
Member
Member # 99

 - posted      Profile for TomDavidson   Email TomDavidson   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
quote:
Since the days of Jamie Bulger, you NEVER leave your children.
Well, honestly, that's more than a little ridiculous. My eldest daughter's five years old, and she's perfectly capable of walking two blocks to the corner drugstore by herself.
Posts: 19689 | Registered: Nov 2000  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
scouser1
unregistered


 - posted            Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
If you want to take that risk, and you know its ok, then power to you. Maybe you live in a place
where you feel safe enough to have your child do that, but even then I would not dream of my child going somewhere on their own so young. Because I know that if anything were to happen to my child while just going to the shop 2 blocks away, it would be be my fault. Because I sent that child to the shop. I would be to blame for whatever happened to my child and that is something I could never ever live with.
But we are talking about a woman that left her children to almost drown. Both of her children could at the very worst could be dead.
Here, you cant do that. Full stop.
The last kid that went "missing" in this country turned out to have been a part of a ploy by her mother and her mother's boyfriend to get money out of people "of Madeleine proportions". The poor kid was constantly drugged up with tranquilisers for 2 years solid!
What the hell is it coming to when we are hearing of more and more people leaving their kids while they go shopping, or go on holiday or make their kids a ploy to squeeze cash out of people?? I just cannot comprehend it, or comprehend what goes through these people's heads.

IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Colin JM0397
Member
Member # 916

 - posted      Profile for Colin JM0397   Email Colin JM0397   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Everyone knows to check the high-tide line before abandoning your kids on the beach. [Roll Eyes]
Damn amateurs ruin it for the rest of us.

This also applies to tying your dog to a piece of driftwood when you nap under a nearby tree.

Posts: 4738 | Registered: Mar 2003  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
TomDavidson
Member
Member # 99

 - posted      Profile for TomDavidson   Email TomDavidson   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
quote:
Because I know that if anything were to happen to my child while just going to the shop 2 blocks away, it would be be my fault.
I don't think a parent can live like that and stay sane. I don't think you can raise a sane child while believing that.
Posts: 19689 | Registered: Nov 2000  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Kuato
Member
Member # 6445

 - posted      Profile for Kuato   Email Kuato       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Scouser, I think we do not live in the same world. Here, that kind of behavior would get your kids taken by Child Protection. Here, if you leave your kids for any reason, you have to leave that child with another child who is or looks 12 years old or you know you are in deep **** because *someone* is going to call----- cell phones, and all.
Posts: 1038 | Registered: Apr 2009  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Aris Katsaris
Member
Member # 888

 - posted      Profile for Aris Katsaris   Email Aris Katsaris   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
For all we know it could have been attempted murder. I hope the woman is checked for possible mental instability.
Posts: 2997 | Registered: Feb 2003  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
scouser1
unregistered


 - posted            Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
The way not to live like that is just to not do it full stop. Not at least until their old enough to actually go places by themselves. I went to and from school by myself from the age of 11 when I started secondary school. When I was a lot older to be extra aware of things and people around me. All kids grow at different rates. Some 5 year olds are 5 going on 42. My niece could not go anywhere by herself right now at this age.

Kuato: that may be the case, but even then, things can happen. Case of Holly Wells and Jessica Chapman. Two ten year old best friends taken by their school caretaker and brutally murdered. Theres a lot of bad people around, wherever you go. We, unlike some of your states over there, do not have the priviledge of things such as Megan's Law. And although I have had and lost two children already, I wouldnt even consider bringing a child up in a place like this.
mdgann is right, at one time you could leave your children outside shops in their prams and nothing would happen. You could even leave your front door open and you wouldnt be robbed. But society has changed so much and so many crimes against children has passed that who wouldnt have serious concerns like this?

IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
scouser1
unregistered


 - posted            Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Aris Katsaris:
For all we know it could have been attempted murder. I hope the woman is checked for possible mental instability.

That is what rung alarm bells in my head. She wasent all "oh my poor kids why did I leave you?" It was more to do with the fact that they spoke to her about it and she didnt "take too kindly". Why was that, because they might see her as a bad mother? Too late, darling.
IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
scifibum
Member
Member # 945

 - posted      Profile for scifibum   Email scifibum   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
quote:
at one time you could leave your children outside shops in their prams and nothing would happen.
I don't think times have actually changed much. Somehow as a society we're being conditioned to be far more risk-averse than any prior generations. Part of it is the ease of information transfer: we're hearing about an incident of child neglect in which no one was hurt in a different country, whereas a decade or two ago we wouldn't have heard about it. We get a lot more information about bad things that do happen and it creates a false impression of increasing danger in the world.

I think the lack of major wars in the last few decades, the general decrease in family farming over the last century or two, improvements in medicine (especially vaccination), have all probably also contributed, since the presence of significant dangers in the past probably overshadowed all the slight ones we are concerned with now.

Rationally, I know I could probably send my 5 year old outside to play by himself and the chances of him getting kidnapped, hit by a car, or falling into a window well and breaking a bone are pretty minute. It feels dangerous, though. It's a false impression I have of how dangerous it would be.

It sounds like Tom is rejecting the notion of increased danger in general, and probably managing to make a more rational assessment of actual risks than some of us do.

I for instance shudder at the thought of sending my kid (also 5) down a couple of blocks by himself, but it's partly because I haven't trained him to be ready for that. I don't teach him to do things by himself because I don't dare let him do things by himself. It's probably inhibiting his development in some ways. Perhaps not directly harmful, but it certainly sets him up to continue the general trend toward paranoia when he's raising his kids.

It's probably worth thinking about. The beach lady did something badly neglectful, I think, but we don't necessarily need to go to the opposite extreme of "never take your eyes off your kids." I'm actually glad Tom raised the point.

Posts: 5611 | Registered: Mar 2003  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Wayward Son
Member
Member # 210

 - posted      Profile for Wayward Son   Email Wayward Son   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
quote:
But society has changed so much and so many crimes against children has passed that who wouldn't have serious concerns like this?
How much society has changed is open to debate. Without question, though, most people's perception of society has changed.

Was it ever safe to leave your door open, or leave your child outside a store in a pram? Probably not. But before, there was a perception that it was safe.

Today, wild, bizarre, very unusual crimes--like the mother and boyfriend who kept their kid drugged up that scouser mentioned--get a great deal of air time. And with so many more people today, the number of such incidents has increased. But the frequency probably has not.

And while the frequency of crime has increased over the past 50 years or so, how much is still open to debate. Is a New Yorker significantly more likely to be robbed if he leaves his door unlocked today than 50 years ago? Sure, the chances have gone up significantly in some smaller cities, but is that because crime is so much worse today or because the population of those cities has increased significantly, bringing with it bigger-city crime?

Is the Five-Point area in New York City worse today or when Davy Crocket said he'd rather fight Indians than walk through there at night? [Wink]

I suspect that the chances of any given child being abducted today are not much worse than 50 years ago, when no one worried about it. But with the amount of news devoted to child abductions today, the perception is that there is a much greater threat. So a parent that allows his child to walk two block to the corner drug store is not necessarily being irresponsible.

On the other hand, there is no way in hell I'd let my child do it. [Smile]

As Dirty Harry so colorfully put it, "You've gotta ask yourself a question..."

(This in no way addresses the subject incident of this thread, BTW. That lady is plain bonkers! [Mad] )

Posts: 7433 | Registered: Dec 2000  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Kuato
Member
Member # 6445

 - posted      Profile for Kuato   Email Kuato       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Uh.

I guess I'm talking about the part when people see a child and can't find a caregiver in view, and go ahead and call police. Police wait with the child, ask the questions (see, this leaves the informant unidentified, which is why parents around here in Oregon are nuts- they won't let their kids go ten feet) and if they can't find an immediate caregiver, they call Child Protection.

This is why I couldn't let my child have the good experience of walking two blocks to the store and buying something, until he was old enough to possibly pass for twelve. I didn't want him picked up by helpful police, and I didn't want to be reported. Even though the neighborhood is "safe" as anywhere and my child was very capable and would have grown from and enjoyed the experience. I don't have the Option of not being super-safe.

My mother left one of the grandkids sleeping in the car while she walked twenty feet to the ATM (FULLY IN SIGHT) to use it to get money. She was reported by someone by cell phone. She barely got out of it, by pointing out that she was, indeed, in sight. The police wanted to cite her for not being within HEARING distance (if, I suppose, the child had moaned but not screamed while being snatched at the moment she put in her pin to the ATM) but didn't, grace of God.

[ June 02, 2009, 01:54 PM: Message edited by: Kuato ]

Posts: 1038 | Registered: Apr 2009  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
scifibum
Member
Member # 945

 - posted      Profile for scifibum   Email scifibum   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Yes, it's not just individuals who are getting more averse to risk. Car seats are an interesting case study.

http://www.thehistoryof.net/history-of-car-seats.html

I think in this case it's a good idea, but mandatory belt positioning booster seats would have seemed like a bizarre idea to families in the 50s and 60s, I think.

Posts: 5611 | Registered: Mar 2003  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Pyrtolin
Member
Member # 2638

 - posted      Profile for Pyrtolin   Email Pyrtolin   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by scifibum:

It's unclear from the article. It sounds as if she might have been unrepentant. If that was the case then the children should have been removed from her custody; it's only a matter of time before they are dead, kidnapped, or severely abused by someone because she doesn't understand they require some supervision.

Despite what Unsolved Mysteries would have you believe, you'd have to leave kids untended for about 70 years before they're statistically likely to be kidnapped or abused.

There are plenty of other considerations for younger kids, but random kidnappings are extremely rare- modern media just highlights the few that happen more clearly.

Posts: 8061 | Registered: Oct 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
scifibum
Member
Member # 945

 - posted      Profile for scifibum   Email scifibum   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Good point. I realize I was being a little hyperbolic there. (I was mad. [Embarrassed] )
Posts: 5611 | Registered: Mar 2003  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Pyrtolin
Member
Member # 2638

 - posted      Profile for Pyrtolin   Email Pyrtolin   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by scouser1:
We, unlike some of your states over there, do not have the priviledge of things such as Megan's Law.

And good for it; it's one of the most useless, reactionary pieces of legislation on the books, and serves only to act as an unofficial life sentence. (Especially when you consider that the crimes that it covers include public urination and two teenagers having sex with each other)

Abuse of the sort that it's supposed to protect against almost always comes from within the family or some other implicitly trusted caregiver.

Posts: 8061 | Registered: Oct 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
KnightEnder
unregistered


 - posted            Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Five years old is too young for a child to walk alone down the sidewalk beside a street in a "nice" neighborhood.

It only takes one nut to drive by. One car to jump the curb. One teenager to lose control changing the radio station. One harried husband in a hurry to get to work to back out too fast. One butterfly to fly in front of the kid and into the street. One pedophile to look out their window. It's also too young to be going in a store by yourself.

Yea, me and Tom disagree!

KE

IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Mormegil
Member
Member # 2439

 - posted      Profile for Mormegil         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
When I was five I walked 4 blocks to the bus stop and took the public bus to go to Kindergarten. When I got home, I let myself in the house with a key safety-pinned inside my pants pocket. My mother was inside, asleep (having worked graveyard shift).

That said, my daughter will be 2 in July and she's never even had a baby sitter; either my wife or me is with her... ALL THE TIME.

Someday though, we'll have to trust her to someone else... I hope I can handle it.

Yes, if I let her walk to the store and she got kidnapped, I'd never forgive myself. But what are the odds of that really happening?

If they are less than the odds of her dying in a car crash, and I take her places in the car all the time with nary a thought, then maybe I'm just worrying excessively. (Or else maybe I should quit driving with her.)

I think I'll lojack her but let her have some freedom. Course, easy to say now because I don't have to actually follow through yet.

Posts: 796 | Registered: May 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Colin JM0397
Member
Member # 916

 - posted      Profile for Colin JM0397   Email Colin JM0397   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
On the "there's a lot of bad people around" note.

I've no idea about the UK, but in the US violent crime rates have been steadily declining from the late 80's-early 90's peak.

According to the media, you'd think a child molester and serial killer lurks around every corner, yet things are quite a bit safer - on average - than they were in the mid 80's when I was growing up and no one worried about us so long as we made it home by dinner time...

I think the paranoia is way overblown.

Posts: 4738 | Registered: Mar 2003  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
TomDavidson
Member
Member # 99

 - posted      Profile for TomDavidson   Email TomDavidson   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
quote:
It only takes one nut to drive by.
That's just as true if I'm with her, of course. Heck, I can't protect her from stray meteors, either.

No parent wants his or her child to come to harm. But no parent can really prevent it, and there comes a point -- which I think every parent has to identify for his- or herself, and depends heavily on the child, the area, etc. -- where attempts to protect a child are themselves more likely to harm the child in some way than the thing they're presumably defending her from. Rapunzel was locked in a tower for her own safety; in response, she tried to run off with the first guy who showed an interest.

I generally object to attempts by the state to tell me what my children can or cannot handle on their own.

Posts: 19689 | Registered: Nov 2000  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Kuato
Member
Member # 6445

 - posted      Profile for Kuato   Email Kuato       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Colin JM0397:
On the "there's a lot of bad people around" note.

I've no idea about the UK, but in the US violent crime rates have been steadily declining from the late 80's-early 90's peak.

According to the media, you'd think a child molester and serial killer lurks around every corner, yet things are quite a bit safer - on average - than they were in the mid 80's when I was growing up and no one worried about us so long as we made it home by dinner time...

I think the paranoia is way overblown.

You need to meet my neighbors. They wondered why my then-six year old son was playing alone IN our yard. Note, we do not have a fence around the front yard.
Posts: 1038 | Registered: Apr 2009  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
RickyB
Member
Member # 1464

 - posted      Profile for RickyB   Email RickyB   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
"Well, honestly, that's more than a little ridiculous. My eldest daughter's five years old, and she's perfectly capable of walking two blocks to the corner drugstore by herself."

Mine is too, but I don't know that he's capable of resisting a grown up taking his hand nicely and walking away with him. And that's in Israel. Not telling you how to raise your kids or anything, but my 5 year old would not be walking alone in any *city* in the US. Small town America, real small, where 50% or more of the people on the street at any given moment know him by name - maybe, yeah, a block or two.

Posts: 19143 | Registered: Jan 2004  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
KnightEnder
unregistered


 - posted            Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Specially not to some place where they are selling drugs! What kind of people is that place gonna attract? [Wink]

Hell, my three year old almost got killed in church with my father a twenty-five year police veteran watching him and less than ten feet away. [Frown]

Still, I believe you have to evaluate the situation and the child. And no matter how mature or well trained (forewarned) the child I wouldn't overestimate the child's ability to avoid danger or temptation.

Plus, it's a parents job/curse to worry. My youngest (16) went to the movies with his very mature 17 year old friend driving and I was still worried until he got home. Friday night drivers not child molesters.

KE

IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
KnightEnder
unregistered


 - posted            Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Did the whole island go under water at high tide? Or were these kids unable to walk 'away' from the rising water? (It says they were found up to their necks. Did they just stand there as the tide came in? I'm confused.)

KE

IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
TomDavidson
Member
Member # 99

 - posted      Profile for TomDavidson   Email TomDavidson   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
quote:
I don't know that he's capable of resisting a grown up taking his hand nicely and walking away with him.
She understands that she shouldn't -- but, yes, I can easily imagine that someone might persuade her otherwise. But it's worth noting that the odds of this happening are incredibly small. It is far, far more likely that a car will jump the curb while she's playing in the yard and kill her than somebody would try to abduct her.

I refuse to cripple her experiences by teaching her to fear the unknown.

Posts: 19689 | Registered: Nov 2000  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
DonaldD
Member
Member # 1052

 - posted      Profile for DonaldD   Email DonaldD   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Last month in my area, a teenager was convicted in the death of a small girl who was playing in her caregiver's front yard.

He had been speeding - arguably racing. Front yard's are obviously not safe for children.

Posts: 9956 | Registered: May 2003  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
TommySama
Member
Member # 2780

 - posted      Profile for TommySama   Email TommySama       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
When I was five I walked about half a mile home from kindergarten every school day to my Alzheimer's grandmas house. As long as your neighborhood isn't full of crackheads and thugs the risk is negligible.
Posts: 6373 | Registered: Feb 2006  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
The Drake
Member
Member # 2128

 - posted      Profile for The Drake   Email The Drake   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
When I was six years old, I walked to first grade at an elementary school three blocks away from my house, including crossing a busy intersection to the opposite corner. The bogeyman didn't get me, I'm happy to report.

Parents today coddle their children. Guess what, the only real way to protect them is to teach them how to protect themselves. Scream bloody murder if a stranger touches you. Look both ways before crossing the street. Always come straight home after school. It's not that hard, and if your kid can't handle it, society doesn't need your genetic material.

Now, as for the woman in question, 4 or 5 is a bit young to leave kids alone - especially on what is apparently Death Trap Beach.

Interestingly, only about 1 in 1,000,000 kids is abducted. I like one website, where they point out that your kid is 700 times more likely to attend Harvard than to be abducted. [Smile]

Then the kids walking to school are in greater danger than before, because of the number of distracted Moms and Dads careening around in SUVs trying to drop their kid at school and get to work. I also knew people on my very quiet, residential street who stood with their eight and nine year old kids at the bus stop until the school bus came and collected them.

Good luck to them when these kids go to college, they'll probably be the ones struck by a car while biking or the ones with alcohol poisoning.

Posts: 7590 | Registered: Oct 2004  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Wayward Son
Member
Member # 210

 - posted      Profile for Wayward Son   Email Wayward Son   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
quote:
It's not that hard, and if your kid can't handle it, society doesn't need your genetic material.
Careful, Drake. Say that to a mom sometime, and society probably won't have to deal with your genetic material anymore. [Wink] [LOL]
Posts: 7433 | Registered: Dec 2000  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
The Drake
Member
Member # 2128

 - posted      Profile for The Drake   Email The Drake   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
heh [Big Grin]
Posts: 7590 | Registered: Oct 2004  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
KnightEnder
unregistered


 - posted            Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
But my boys aren't going to attend Harvard so that means their chances of getting abducted are way higher!

KE

IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Wayward Son
Member
Member # 210

 - posted      Profile for Wayward Son   Email Wayward Son   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Don't ya just love statistics, KE. [Big Grin]
Posts: 7433 | Registered: Dec 2000  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
mdgann
Member
Member # 2572

 - posted      Profile for mdgann   Email mdgann   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
My wife and I go around and around about this all the time. I think that stuffing your head in the sand and insulating your kids is a dangerous precedent that will be difficult for your kids to overcome someday. I read an article (that I can't locate at the moment) about kids in the US having a low apparent age compared to the rest of the world. Chronological ages of 18 were compared to 14 year old kids worldwide. As we as parents solve our children's problems for them and bring their books to school because they forgot them, we are retarding their maturity levels and they "grow up" more slowly. I'm not talking about purposely exposing them either.
Posts: 116 | Registered: Aug 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Wayward Son
Member
Member # 210

 - posted      Profile for Wayward Son   Email Wayward Son   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
On the other hand, you have to consider the consequences of not "growing up" fast enough, too. If forgetting their books means they fail their class, holding them back a grade, perhaps a small decrease in the rate of their maturity is acceptable.

Or (heaven forbid) the chance of them not "growing up" at all. [Eek!]

Posts: 7433 | Registered: Dec 2000  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
   

Quick Reply
Message:

HTML is not enabled.
UBB Code™ is enabled.
UBB Code™ Images not permitted.
Instant Graemlins
   


Post New Topic  Post A Reply Close Topic   Feature Topic   Move Topic   Delete Topic next oldest topic   next newest topic
 - Printer-friendly view of this topic
Hop To:


Contact Us | Ornery.org Front Page

Powered by Infopop Corporation
UBB.classic™ 6.7.1