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Author Topic: Biased Reporting
Jon Camp
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quote:
You might want to know that active duty law enforcement officers are applying for the nice little federal government airport security screener jobs. They’re not getting hired. They’re being passed over in favor of simply re-hiring some of the losers that currently man the x-ray stations. Can you believe it? The Transportation Security Administration is telling COPS that they’re not qualified to be airport security screeners.

I did some diggin on this and found nothing to back it up. Instead, I found a very good reason as to why cops are being denied. Cops apparently wish to keep their "day jobs" as cops, and so are applying for part-time positions, but ony full-time applications are being accepted.

Doesn't sound so bad anymore, does it?

As an aside, only 7,700 of 517,000 applicants nationwide were found to be acceptable. The TSA is looking to fill 52,000 positions. I found the following as things that are looked at, but nothing that actually specified what of the things that are looked at would cause disqualification.

quote:
Applicants must be U.S. citizens with a high school diploma or one year of full-time work in airport screening or another security position and be proficient in English. During the multistep application process, potential hires must complete physical tests, including vision and flexibility, to ensure they can bend down and use the detection wand.

Applicants also submit to a criminal background check, in which the TSA checks for felonies, TSA spokeswoman Heather Rosenker said.

Their financial background is also questioned, including providing information about bankruptcy in the last seven years and if the applicant was more than 180 days delinquent on loans or financial obligations.


Makes you wonder: Are people with bad credit being denied?


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Falken224
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quote:
Makes you wonder: Are people with bad credit being denied?

Hell yeah. Shows a POSSIBLE (nobody with bad credit take offense, please) lack of responsibility in one area of their lives, possibly indicating others which MIGHT end up being job-related. Not to mention the fact that people in rough financial situations are FAR more susceptible to bribery than those who are fairly financially secure.

Besides, it's not just bad credit. It's bankruptcies . . . a pretty drastic financial situation . . . and 180 days or more of delinquency.

6 months late?? Barring some sort of dispute, wouldn't you say that signifies a slight tendency toward lack of attention at the very least?

I'm sure I'm going to get some irate feedback on this one, but it really is (in general terms) a fairly decent indicator of responsibility.

-Nate


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Jon Camp
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I agree with you Falken. I think that as a general rule, a person'd creit history is an excellent indicator of his level of responsibilty.

I think it's funny too that the conservative commentators focus on this part of the requirements:

quote:
Applicants must be U.S. citizens with a high school diploma OR one year of full-time work in airport screening or another security position. . . .

(Emphasis mine)


That part does sound prettyy lax, but then when you add in the background check and credit history, it sounds like a pretty good system. Too bad it still only pays about $12.50 an hour to start. I'd even consider applying . . . .


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Wayward Son
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BTW, Jon, where did you find this little piece of disinformation?
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Luny
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Can I point out that just because a person has a less than perfect financial history, that doesn't mean that they are neccessarily irresponsible with their money.

There are some people who end up over extending themselves out of neccessity. My father had a career in the military for instance... even at the rank that he had at the time he RETIRED we still qualified for food stamps and other federal assistance. My father being the proud man that he is insisted on getting a second job instead of taking federal assistance and was subsiquently forced to quit his second job because the military said that it was bad public image that a master seargent was moonlighting as a delivery driver. But I guess that's for another thread...


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jonthegm
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Well, in my experience (anecdotal evidence) I have never met a responsible person with a terrible credit rating. Maybe not perfect credit ratings, but decently so...
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Falken224
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quote:
Well, in my experience (anecdotal evidence) I have never met a responsible person with a terrible credit rating. Maybe not perfect credit ratings, but decently so...

Actually, I have. At least three family friends/relatives and my parents. (all were in on the same business venture)

First off, credit rating does not equate in any way with quality of person.

And I'll point out as well, that my parents have a TERRIBLE credit history, mostly because of one or two BIG business mistakes that just killed 'em financially. All the late payments ended finally in bankruptcy and their credit rating is pretty much worthless at this point. (will improve, I'm sure, but not for a nice, long time.) Furthermore, I'd recommend them for any position in almost any line of work . . . either one of them. (well, I wouldn't recommend mom for a pharmacist . . . we won't go there at the moment, but for the most part . . . ) In this case, credit history isn't the best indicator.

So yes, there are exceptions to the rules. But there's a reason credit ratings exist. There's a reason why you can't get a loan of ANY kind if your credit rating's below 500. There's a reason why banks are willing to extend credit to almost anybody under almost any circumstances with a credit rating of 800 or more. (Yes, 800s are rare indeed, but I've seen 'em once or twice) And yes, there's a reason the Idaho State Police checked my credit rating when they hired me.

Because statistically speaking, the lower the credit scores, the bigger the risk. The higher the scores, the better.

And most employers/lenders are willing to be wrong that 2-10 percent of the time, in order to keep themselves safer . . . for the most part.

-Nate

[This message has been edited by Falken224 (edited August 28, 2002).]


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Baldar
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I have generally taken a credit rating along with the context of several other questions when hiring someone. There are people with bad credit because they are not good independent businessmen/women, but are excellent stewards of responsibility within a company.

Credit rating does not necessarily indicate character. There is more to a person than how he handles money.


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dyany
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Well from personal experience...after I finished college (debt-free, due to scholarships), I moved to Idaho and had a heck of a time getting a job...made less than $7000 per year for 2 years straight, and that was scrounging every odd job I could put together. Being 1700 miles from home didn't help either. I had pneumonia during that time and car problems as well, but I always paid my bills, though I often had to borrow from credit cards to do it (even borrowing from one to pay another). My credit even through all this was excellent and I never maxed my cards...right now (about 6 years later) my credit rating is over 950. I'm not bragging...crud, it's embarrassing that I did that badly and I haven't been able to get out of debt since...I'm just saying that if you are very careful and deny yourself items constantly (didn't have a chair for over a year, or a table for over 2 years, used plastic utensils all that time), you can survive and keep good credit -- though it may mean you have to say no to risks (like business stuff) and things like that for a while. Though I really wish I had asked for assistance (gov't or church) at that time, I think that would have helped. I do think that it is definitely a strong factor (though not 100%, of course) in determining a person's level of responsibility, as well as ability to resist temptations for personal gain.
D

[This message has been edited by dyany (edited September 03, 2002).]


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pseudoCode
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As far as the credit check goes, this is a standard procedure in a security clearance. In my military days (not too long ago), a "secret" clearance (which isn't very high really) consisted of little more than a credit check.
The logic is that if you are hurting finanacially, you could be bribed by foriegn agents for $. For higher clearances, they actually go looking for dirt on you, lest some foriegn spy blackmail you.

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