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Author Topic: Reaon # 426 to Hate Dallas
Zyne
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http://frontburner.dmagazine.com/archives2/011624.html#more

First, Highland Park ISD had Thug Day, where they had fake gold teeth. Then there was Fiesta Day, where students showed up as pregnant Mexican women and yard workers.

No shame for the rich whiteys?

[ November 03, 2005, 12:06 AM: Message edited by: Zyne ]

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Richard Dey
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Zyne, it's no different than Grosse Pointe, Mill Valley, or Scarsdale. I went to such a thing at the Piedmont Driving Club in Atlanta once. Don't worry about it. This is just the managerial class. The people who actually own the country are far, far worse.
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KnightEnder
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I went to a school that was half hispanic half white. But there were no differences between us and them. We all dressed the same, and we all were friends. There were no gangs or discrimination. What the hell is wrong? Aren't things supposed to get better as time goes on and we become more enlightened?

KE

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Cytania
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Something is rotten in the state of Texas. Why do young people who should be having fun go to elaborate lengths to be offensive and darkly cynical? What in American culture twists young minds so early on? It's just plain nasty.

[ November 03, 2005, 04:57 AM: Message edited by: Cytania ]

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Gary
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quote:
Originally posted by Cytania:
What in American culture twists young minds so early on? It's just plain nasty.

Perhaps this story will answer your question:
quote:
Black Democratic leaders in Maryland say that racially tinged attacks against Lt. Gov. Michael S. Steele in his bid for the U.S. Senate are fair because he is a conservative Republican.

Such attacks against the first black man to win a statewide election in Maryland include pelting him with Oreo cookies during a campaign appearance, calling him an "Uncle Tom" and depicting him as a black-faced minstrel on a liberal Web log.

I think the outrage is a little misplaced here if we're to follow the beliefs of Kweisi Mfume:
quote:
But black Democrats say there is nothing wrong with "pointing out the obvious."

"There is a difference between pointing out the obvious and calling someone names," said a campaign spokesman for Kweisi Mfume, a Democratic candidate for U.S. Senate and former president of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People.

So the question we need to ask, are these people in Dallas Democrats who are merely pointing out the obvious? If they're Democrats, then they are doing just that and everything is perectly fine. If they're Republicans, only then would there be a problem. The story did not mention party affiliation so we don't know the answer to the most important question here.

Now to anwer Cytania's question, they learn these things from the leadership of one of the primary political parties in America - Democrats.

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Serotonin'sGone
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quote:
Something is rotten in the state of Texas. Why do young people who should be having fun go to elaborate lengths to be offensive and darkly cynical? What in American culture twists young minds so early on? It's just plain nasty.
don't you remember what it is to be a teenager? Those were the most darkly cynical years of my life. Anyway--these kids aren't trying to offend minorities so much as their teachers/parents. They want to start a scene, and apparently they've succeeded so well that it's now getting them press even outside of texas. Hopefully in a few years when/if they become human they'll realize what assholes they were...

edit to gary: You do realize that we can think that both of those events are deplorable without our minds exploding...

[ November 03, 2005, 10:19 AM: Message edited by: Serotonin'sGone ]

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Wayward Son
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quote:
So the question we need to ask, are these people in Dallas Democrats who are merely pointing out the obvious? If they're Democrats, then they are doing just that and everything is perectly fine. If they're Republicans, only then would there be a problem. The story did not mention party affiliation so we don't know the answer to the most important question here.
An perfect example of the aforementioned cynicism, and politically motivated to boot. [Razz]
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Gary
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quote:
Originally posted by Serotonin'sGone:
edit to gary: You do realize that we can think that both of those events are deplorable without our minds exploding...

Sure but that wasn't the question, the question was, "What in American culture twists young minds so early on?" I agree with your take on the teenagers but the reason they think they may not be offensive to minorities is because they are only "pointing out the obvious" - a position taken by the NAACP. If they are in line with NAACP ideology, then how can they think they're doing anything wrong in regards to race?
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Gary
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quote:
Originally posted by Wayward Son:
quote:
So the question we need to ask, are these people in Dallas Democrats who are merely pointing out the obvious? If they're Democrats, then they are doing just that and everything is perectly fine. If they're Republicans, only then would there be a problem. The story did not mention party affiliation so we don't know the answer to the most important question here.
An perfect example of the aforementioned cynicism, and politically motivated to boot. [Razz]
I take it you did not read the story linked. I derived the question from this:
quote:
"Party trumps race, especially on the national level," she said. [State Sen. Lisa A. Gladden, a black Baltimore Democrat]
You may think I'm being cynical but the truth is I'm asking a very relevant question in today's poltical and racial climate. When it comes to questions of racism, party affiliation is key. Democrats are not racist, Republicans are - at least according to black Democrats.

What do you think would have happened if a Republican threw oreo cookies at Steele? Would the NAACP have defended it? They defended the Democrats ...

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Wayward Son
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No, Gary, I did not bother reading your link, because the topic of this thread is the antics at Highland Park High School. There is no indication that there was anything to do with political parties in these incidents. The fact that you immediately try to place the blame on a particular political party indicates to me that you are more interested in smearing a particular party--Democrats--than you are in finding out the truth.

Perhaps "cynicism" is not the correct word, but it was the best I could come up with at the moment. Perhaps you can find a better word meaning "the making of unfounded allegations based on political prejudice."

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Koner
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quote:
So the question we need to ask, are these people in Dallas Democrats who are merely pointing out the obvious? If they're Democrats, then they are doing just that and everything is perectly fine. If they're Republicans, only then would there be a problem. The story did not mention party affiliation so we don't know the answer to the most important question here.
I seriously doubt that the kids were neither Democrat nor Republican. My money says that they are stupid kids doing stupid kid things in order to piss off the adults by doing something totally inappropriate.

Is it the kids fault for doing it or is it the parents/teachers fault for allowing them to do it?

quote:
Something is rotten in the state of Texas. Why do young people who should be having fun go to elaborate lengths to be offensive and darkly cynical?
I bet its not just Texas. I'm sure you could find examples where equally stupid things have been done by teenagers in every other state.

quote:
What in American culture twists young minds so early on? It's just plain nasty.
Mom, Dad, teachers and TV. The four primary influences on the lives of children. Its not the kids, its the adults in their lives. Mostly I blame the parents for not being involved enough in the lives of their children. Take away the electronic baby sitters and spend time with your kids and teach them how to behave and they won't do stupid crap like this anymore.
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JohnLocke
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I'm sure these kids are unduly influenced by the NAACP and get most of their manners passed down to them by black democrats. It's a perfectly logical way to intepret this story.

[ November 03, 2005, 11:11 AM: Message edited by: JohnLocke ]

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Gary
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quote:
Originally posted by Wayward Son:
No, Gary, I did not bother reading your link, because the topic of this thread is the antics at Highland Park High School. There is no indication that there was anything to do with political parties in these incidents. The fact that you immediately try to place the blame on a particular political party indicates to me that you are more interested in smearing a particular party--Democrats--than you are in finding out the truth.

The fact that you immediately try to deflect my answer to a relevant question in order to defend a particular party without even bothering to read the link tells me that you are not interested in finding out the truth. You're just providing a knee jerk reaction.

It was a good question; what in American culture twists young minds so early on? We've seen the demonization of Condoleeza Rice as an "Uncle Tom" and a "House Nigga". Now the racist smear of Mr. Steele complete with a racist caricature (just as bad as those depicting Rice).

You think these kids are totally unaware of the racial smears directed at conservative blacks? Do you think they're able to differentiate the political leanings involved or do they merely parrot the Democrats thinking if it's done by the leaders of the country and the NAACP it's all just fine?

How many Republicans are throwing oreos? How many are calling black democrats "house niggas"? How many Republicans were recruiters for the KKK? These kids are young and immature but they're not stupid nor do they live in a vacuum. They can see what's going on and they will mimic it. Now they have the stamp of approval from what should be the leading authority on racism in America - the NAACP.

So were the "antics at Highland Park High School" wrong? I certainly think they were, what is the position of the NAACP and leaders in the Democratic party? It apparently depends on party affiliation. If the kids engaging in this behavior come out and claim they were "merely pointing out the obvious" and that they are dedicated Democrats, they will get a pass on this behavior from the very people that should be the leaders in condemning it.

Wayward Son, I would be interested in you answer to the question asked by Cytania. What do you think gave them the idea this was acceptable?

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Gary
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quote:
Originally posted by JohnLocke:
I'm sure these kids are unduly influenced by the NAACP and get most of their manners passed down to them by black democrats. It's a perfectly logical way to intepret this story.

You can blow sarcasm all you want but what do you think the answer is to Cytania's question? Is it just the attitudes of being a teenager as Serotonin'sGone suggests and nothing more? How about Koner's response that it's the loss of parental influence and the rise of "electronic babysitters"? Could it be that my response has some relevance as well? I'm willing to concede it is likely a combination of these factors. What's your thoughts?

Something gave these kids the idea it was acceptable. Where should we look to see these ideas propogated? Who could have possibly left these kids with the impression such behavior was acceptable? A good place to start is where such behavior is currently acceptable, namely the Democratic party.

I know you knee jerk defenders of the Democrats will condemn that but the treatment of Rice and other black conservatives over the last few years and the story I link to pretty conclusively proves the point. The NAACP defends throwing oreos at a black conservative - Martin Luther King must be rolling in his grave.

These kids may not be as aware of all the political undercurrents as those on forums such as these but to think they are totally unaware of these things is denial.

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Wayward Son
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quote:
The fact that you immediately try to deflect my answer to a relevant question in order to defend a particular party without even bothering to read the link tells me that you are not interested in finding out the truth. You're just providing a knee jerk reaction.
No, I am just reacting to obvious BS when I see it. What, exactly, made you think that the attitudes of the NAACP had anything to do with this incident, based on the information provided and not any pre-existing axe you have to grind?

quote:
You think these kids are totally unaware of the racial smears directed at conservative blacks? Do you think they're able to differentiate the political leanings involved or do they merely parrot the Democrats thinking if it's done by the leaders of the country and the NAACP it's all just fine?
Totally, no. Primarily on their minds, I doubt it. I did not even remember the incident you refer to until you mentioned it. I'm not even sure if I really even read about it.

How influential do you believe the NAACP and the Democratic party in general is to these kids? As opposed to Jerry Farwell and Pat Robinson (especially in Texas)?

Now compare that influence to Snoop Doggie-Dog and every other rap and musical group in the nation. Which do you think had the most influence?

quote:
Wayward Son, I would be interested in you answer to the question asked by Cytania. What do you think gave them the idea this was acceptable?
Primarily peers and popular culture, with some parential influence thrown in. As I implied before, MTV probably has more blame in this matter than the entire American politcal system. The hypocrasy of the NAACP and their ilk had, at best, a minor influence in this case.

You're placing the primary blame on the NAACP and the entire Democratic party seems completely unfounded on the face of it. You'll have to show a far more substantial reason than simply recalling another racial incident to prove any link between the two.

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Gary
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I'm not placing primary blame on NAACP and the Democrats - just a significant amount of it. In the post above, I agree that a number of factors are contributors but the only place I see these things being actually condoned and supported are the NAACP and Democrats.

When these kids left the house that morning, do you think their parents thought anything about it? Did they question it and come to the conclusion that MTV popularizes it as you say (I don't watch MTV - are they calling black people racial slurs now?) and the NAACP supports these kinds of things so it's probably OK? You can't put the kids in a vacuum as though the decisions were theirs alone.

It's not one single racial event that promotes this. The attacks on Rice were numerous and spread over several months. Recent comments by Democrat leaders in Louisiane like Ray Nagin about keeping mexicans out of New Orleans (and one of the city councilmen of N.O. saying it's blacks first in jobs) play on the morning drive radio shows here in Austin frequently - I'm sure many kids have heard them - and are the objects of humor, not condemnation. Given the homogenous nature of radio in the Clear Channel era of today can we assume these kids in Dallas have heard similar "bits"? I think so.

quote:
Primarily peers and popular culture, with some parential influence thrown in.
Popular culture, yes - that's huge. And look at what's up and coming in pop culture, bashing black conservatives.

[ November 03, 2005, 12:03 PM: Message edited by: Gary ]

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The Drake
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It is interesting to point out one thing.

"You're supposed to wear a sombrero, not be in a painter's outfit."

Is a sombrero NOT stereotypical? And is a painter's outfit really something to be ashamed of? This is how they see hispanics around them, and it is in many ways accurate to their experience and as a reflection of changing trends.

Should certain racial groups be immune from satire? Kids can watch George Lopez on television, think that his jokes based on stereotypes are funny. But if they repeat them to friends or act them out in costume, they become racist monsters?

Yes, they may have gone over the line here. I can't speculate on their intentions and motivations.

But I could see myself having done something similar as a 17 year old kid, and it wouldn't be out of malice or ignorance. It would be to stir up trouble with the faculty.

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TCB
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Koner said:
quote:
I bet its not just Texas. I'm sure you could find examples where equally stupid things have been done by teenagers in every other state.

I know at least one rich school near mine did the exact same thing when I was in high school in Ohio. Except it wasn't a Mexican thing, it was just a socio-economic thing.

Gary, there are about a million racist paradigms in this country, and they're all connected in one way or another. There's no way to judge the influence of one particular racist institution compared to all the others on Texas teens.

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Pete at Home
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quote:
Originally posted by Wayward Son:
No, Gary, I did not bother reading your link, because the topic of this thread is the antics at Highland Park High School. There is no indication that there was anything to do with political parties in these incidents. The fact that you immediately try to place the blame on a particular political party indicates to me that you are more interested in smearing a particular party--Democrats--than you are in finding out the truth.

Perhaps "cynicism" is not the correct word, but it was the best I could come up with at the moment. Perhaps you can find a better word meaning "the making of unfounded allegations based on political prejudice."

Gary's full of crap to smear this on Democrats in general, but he's right that the rhetoric of "racism" is riddled with hypocrisy. Why should young people give a floundering frag about what we tell them about racism being bad, when the leaders of our land exploit race issues like a pimp parading his prize whore. When organizations that pretend to be about civil rights, use language that would make the KKK blush under their pale sheets? When gay rights organizations market derogatory epithets like "queer," and expose closet-gays to public ridicule?

How the hell is a child supposed to take us seriously about racism, any more than they take us seriously about sex, or safe sex, or drugs, or anything else that we're so transparently hypocritical about?

No.

They're going to see that we're a bunch of humbugs, and they are going to crack stupid and nihilistic jokes, because honestly, we didn't teach them any better. Not really. Actions speak louder than words.

The party you describe is horrible, but I hardly see why this is more cynical and racist than the "pimps and hos" parties that have been popular over the country, including among "progressives," for several years now.

As for Mexicans, with the way they are treated in most states, California, Nevada, Arizona ... Every election season, the states manage to send Mexicans the message that we dispise them. They do most of the physical work in this country, for a rather meager return. They get treated like inferiors by blacks and whites alike. You really think this party is going to make a drop in the bucket? This is just one more symptom of a deep and pernicious disease.

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Cytania
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The difference between sombreros and painters outfit is that the sombrero look is one Mexico celebrates and sees as a postitive part of it's culture; like stetsons and cowboys in the US.

The painter slur suggests that all Mexicans are fit for is low-skill low-pay jobs. By dwelling on less than apsirational images no matter what their reality negative stereotypes are being reinforced. It's that these students put so much effort into their costumed offense that staggers me.

[ November 04, 2005, 06:44 AM: Message edited by: Cytania ]

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Pete at Home
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It's pretty much what the Europeans did to the Jews -- lock them into a specific line of work, depend on them economically for performing that function, and then degrade them for the work they do.
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Cytania
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Absolutely Pete, it was that so much of Europe accepted the stereotype as real that allowed Hitler political leverage. These images need to be challenged whenever they are invoked as 'the way things are'.

Those kids could have dressed as Carlos Santana or Che Guevara. Wouldn't it have looked cool\weird if they all went as Fidel Castro, could take over from Elvis conventions?

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Gary
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quote:
Originally posted by Pete at Home:
Gary's full of crap to smear this on Democrats in general, but he's right that the rhetoric of "racism" is riddled with hypocrisy. Why should young people give a floundering frag about what we tell them about racism being bad, when the leaders of our land exploit race issues like a pimp parading his prize whore.

Please list the "leaders of our land" you refer to that are exploiting race issues.
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The Drake
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Mexico for dummies

So you see, the sombrero stereotype is also damaging...

quote:
Mexico is the land of sombreros and siestas

The common image of a Mexican napping under his sombrero exists in some minds, but this stereotype is mostly made of myth. Today, Mexico is a mix of contemporary business professionals and traditional agrarian populations. The afternoon break — between 2 and 4 p.m. — is still a wonderful tradition, but rather than being a time for siesta, it's the time when families come together for their main meal of the day. The more familiar you become with Mexico, the more you find that the people are overwhelmingly hard working, hospitable, and honest.


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Pete at Home
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quote:
Originally posted by Gary:
quote:
Originally posted by Pete at Home:
Why should young people give a floundering frag about what we tell them about racism being bad, when the leaders of our land exploit race issues like a pimp parading his prize whore.

Please list the "leaders of our land" you refer to that are exploiting race issues.
Your example of Kwesei, for example. That "uncle Tom" epithet is a naked appeal to racist hate. And the guy's in charge of what used to be a civil rights organization. [Frown]
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Gary
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Kweisi Mfume, that would be the Democrat candidate for senate in Maryland.
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Pete at Home
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Which is why I said you were full of crap to pin smear Democrats in general for behavior of a few fringies. That sort of crap invites Democrats to retaliate by finding some Racist Republican somewhere and smear the whole GOP party.
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Gary
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quote:
Originally posted by Pete at Home:
Which is why I said you were full of crap to pin smear Democrats in general for behavior of a few fringies. That sort of crap invites Democrats to retaliate by finding some Racist Republican somewhere and smear the whole GOP party.

In general? Fringies? Let's revisit a little history for those that forget (sorry for the long post/quote):
quote:

March 20, 1854
Opponents of Democrats’ pro-slavery policies meet in Ripon, Wisconsin to establish the Republican Party

May 30, 1854
Democrat President Franklin Pierce signs Democrats’ Kansas-Nebraska Act, expanding slavery into U.S. territories; opponents unite to form the Republican Party

June 16, 1854
Newspaper editor Horace Greeley calls on opponents of slavery to unite in the Republican Party

July 6, 1854
First state Republican Party officially organized in Jackson, Michigan, to oppose Democrats’ pro-slavery policies

February 11, 1856
Republican Montgomery Blair argues before U.S. Supreme Court on behalf of his client, the slave Dred Scott; later served in President Lincoln’s Cabinet

February 22, 1856
First national meeting of the Republican Party, in Pittsburgh, to coordinate opposition to Democrats’ pro-slavery policies

March 27, 1856
First meeting of Republican National Committee in Washington, DC to oppose Democrats’ pro-slavery policies

May 22, 1856
For denouncing Democrats’ pro-slavery policy, Republican U.S. Senator Charles Sumner (R-MA) is beaten nearly to death on floor of Senate by U.S. Rep. Preston Brooks (D-SC), takes three years to recover

March 6, 1857
Republican Supreme Court Justice John McLean issues strenuous dissent from decision by 7 Democrats in infamous Dred Scott case that African-Americans had no rights “which any white man was bound to respect”

June 26, 1857
Abraham Lincoln declares Republican position that slavery is “cruelly wrong,” while Democrats “cultivate and excite hatred” for blacks

October 13, 1858
During Lincoln-Douglas debates, U.S. Senator Stephen Douglas (D-IL) states: “I do not regard the Negro as my equal, and positively deny that he is my brother, or any kin to me whatever”; Douglas became Democratic Party’s 1860 presidential nominee

October 25, 1858
U.S. Senator William Seward (R-NY) describes Democratic Party as “inextricably committed to the designs of the slaveholders”; as President Abraham Lincoln’s Secretary of State, helped draft Emancipation Proclamation

June 4, 1860
Republican U.S. Senator Charles Sumner (R-MA) delivers his classic address, The Barbarism of Slavery

April 7, 1862
President Lincoln concludes treaty with Britain for suppression of slave trade

April 16, 1862
President Lincoln signs bill abolishing slavery in District of Columbia; in Congress, 99% of Republicans vote yes, 83% of Democrats vote no

July 2, 1862
U.S. Rep. Justin Morrill (R-VT) wins passage of Land Grant Act, establishing colleges open to African-Americans, including such students as George Washington Carver

July 17, 1862
Over unanimous Democrat opposition, Republican Congress passes Confiscation Act stating that slaves of the Confederacy “shall be forever free”

August 19, 1862
Republican newspaper editor Horace Greeley writes Prayer of Twenty Millions, calling on President Lincoln to declare emancipation

August 25, 1862
President Abraham Lincoln authorizes enlistment of African-American soldiers in U.S. Army

September 22, 1862
Republican President Abraham Lincoln issues Emancipation Proclamation

January 1, 1863
Emancipation Proclamation, implementing the Republicans’ Confiscation Act of 1862, takes effect

February 9, 1864
Susan B. Anthony and Elizabeth Cady Stanton deliver over 100,000 signatures to U.S. Senate supporting Republicans’ plans for constitutional amendment to ban slavery

June 15, 1864
Republican Congress votes equal pay for African-American troops serving in U.S. Army during Civil War

June 28, 1864
Republican majority in Congress repeals Fugitive Slave Acts

October 29, 1864
African-American abolitionist Sojourner Truth says of President Lincoln: “I never was treated by anyone with more kindness and cordiality than were shown to me by that great and good man”

January 31, 1865
13th Amendment banning slavery passed by U.S. House with unanimous Republican support, intense Democrat opposition

March 3, 1865
Republican Congress establishes Freedmen’s Bureau to provide health care, education, and technical assistance to emancipated slaves

April 8, 1865
13th Amendment banning slavery passed by U.S. Senate with 100% Republican support, 63% Democrat opposition

June 19, 1865
On “Juneteenth,” U.S. troops land in Galveston, TX to enforce ban on slavery that had been declared more than two years before by the Emancipation Proclamation

November 22, 1865
Republicans denounce Democrat legislature of Mississippi for enacting “black codes,” which institutionalized racial discrimination

December 6, 1865
Republican Party’s 13th Amendment, banning slavery, is ratified

February 5, 1866
U.S. Rep. Thaddeus Stevens (R-PA) introduces legislation, successfully opposed by Democrat President Andrew Johnson, to implement “40 acres and a mule” relief by distributing land to former slaves

April 9, 1866
Republican Congress overrides Democrat President Johnson’s veto; Civil Rights Act of 1866, conferring rights of citizenship on African-Americans, becomes law

April 19, 1866
Thousands assemble in Washington, DC to celebrate Republican Party’s abolition of slavery

May 10, 1866
U.S. House passes Republicans’ 14th Amendment guaranteeing due process and equal protection of the laws to all citizens; 100% of Democrats vote no

June 8, 1866
U.S. Senate passes Republicans’ 14th Amendment guaranteeing due process and equal protection of the law to all citizens; 94% of Republicans vote yes and 100% of Democrats vote no

July 16, 1866
Republican Congress overrides Democrat President Andrew Johnson’s veto of Freedman's Bureau Act, which protected former slaves from “black codes” denying their rights

July 28, 1866
Republican Congress authorizes formation of the Buffalo Soldiers, two regiments of African-American cavalrymen

July 30, 1866
Democrat-controlled City of New Orleans orders police to storm racially-integrated Republican meeting; raid kills 40 and wounds more than 150

January 8, 1867
Republicans override Democrat President Andrew Johnson’s veto of law granting voting rights to African-Americans in D.C.

July 19, 1867
Republican Congress overrides Democrat President Andrew Johnson’s veto of legislation protecting voting rights of African-Americans

March 30, 1868
Republicans begin impeachment trial of Democrat President Andrew Johnson, who declared: “This is a country for white men, and by God, as long as I am President, it shall be a government of white men”

May 20, 1868
Republican National Convention marks debut of African-American politicians on national stage; two – Pinckney Pinchback and James Harris – attend as delegates, and several serve as presidential electors

September 3, 1868
25 African-Americans in Georgia legislature, all Republicans, expelled by Democrat majority; later reinstated by Republican Congress

September 12, 1868
Civil rights activist Tunis Campbell and all other African-Americans in Georgia Senate, every one a Republican, expelled by Democrat majority; would later be reinstated by Republican Congress

September 28, 1868
Democrats in Opelousas, Louisiana murder nearly 300 African-Americans who tried to prevent an assault against a Republican newspaper editor

October 7, 1868
Republicans denounce Democratic Party’s national campaign theme: “This is a white man’s country: Let white men rule”

October 22, 1868
While campaigning for re-election, Republican U.S. Rep. James Hinds (R-AR) is assassinated by Democrat terrorists who organized as the Ku Klux Klan

November 3, 1868
Republican Ulysses Grant defeats Democrat Horatio Seymour in presidential election; Seymour had denounced Emancipation Proclamation

December 10, 1869
Republican Gov. John Campbell of Wyoming Territory signs FIRST-in-nation law granting women right to vote and to hold public office

February 3, 1870
After passing House with 98% Republican support and 97% Democrat opposition, Republicans’ 15th Amendment is ratified, granting vote to all Americans regardless of race

May 19, 1870
African-American John Langston, law professor and future Republican Congressman from Virginia, delivers influential speech supporting President Ulysses Grant’s civil rights policies

May 31, 1870
President U.S. Grant signs Republicans’ Enforcement Act, providing stiff penalties for depriving any American’s civil rights

June 22, 1870
Republican Congress creates U.S. Department of Justice, to safeguard the civil rights of African-Americans against Democrats in the South

September 6, 1870
Women vote in Wyoming, in FIRST election after women’s suffrage signed into law by Republican Gov. John Campbell

February 28, 1871
Republican Congress passes Enforcement Act providing federal protection for African-American voters

March 22, 1871
Spartansburg Republican newspaper denounces Ku Klux Klan campaign to eradicate the Republican Party in South Carolina

April 20, 1871
Republican Congress enacts the Ku Klux Klan Act, outlawing Democratic Party-affiliated terrorist groups which oppressed African-Americans

October 10, 1871
Following warnings by Philadelphia Democrats against black voting, African-American Republican civil rights activist Octavius Catto murdered by Democratic Party operative; his military funeral was attended by thousands

October 18, 1871
After violence against Republicans in South Carolina, President Ulysses Grant deploys U.S. troops to combat Democrat terrorists who formed the Ku Klux Klan

November 18, 1872
Susan B. Anthony arrested for voting, after boasting to Elizabeth Cady Stanton that she voted for “the Republican ticket, straight”

January 17, 1874
Armed Democrats seize Texas state government, ending Republican efforts to racially integrate government

September 14, 1874
Democrat white supremacists seize Louisiana statehouse in attempt to overthrow racially-integrated administration of Republican Governor William Kellogg; 27 killed

March 1, 1875
Civil Rights Act of 1875, guaranteeing access to public accommodations without regard to race, signed by Republican President U.S. Grant; passed with 92% Republican support over 100% Democrat opposition

September 20, 1876
Former state Attorney General Robert Ingersoll (R-IL) tells veterans: “Every man that loved slavery better than liberty was a Democrat… I am a Republican because it is the only free party that ever existed”

January 10, 1878
U.S. Senator Aaron Sargent (R-CA) introduces Susan B. Anthony amendment for women’s suffrage; Democrat-controlled Senate defeated it 4 times before election of Republican House and Senate guaranteed its approval in 1919

July 14, 1884
Republicans criticize Democratic Party’s nomination of racist U.S. Senator Thomas Hendricks (D-IN) for vice president; he had voted against the 13th Amendment banning slavery

August 30, 1890
Republican President Benjamin Harrison signs legislation by U.S. Senator Justin Morrill (R-VT) making African-Americans eligible for land-grant colleges in the South

June 7, 1892
In a FIRST for a major U.S. political party, two women – Theresa Jenkins and Cora Carleton – attend Republican National Convention in an official capacity, as alternate delegates

February 8, 1894
Democrat Congress and Democrat President Grover Cleveland join to repeal Republicans’ Enforcement Act, which had enabled African-Americans to vote

December 11, 1895
African-American Republican and former U.S. Rep. Thomas Miller (R-SC) denounces new state constitution written to disenfranchise African-Americans

May 18, 1896
Republican Justice John Marshall Harlan, dissenting from Supreme Court’s notorious Plessy v. Ferguson “separate but equal” decision, declares: “Our Constitution is color-blind, and neither knows nor tolerates classes among citizens”

December 31, 1898
Republican Theodore Roosevelt becomes Governor of New York; in 1900, he outlawed racial segregation in New York public schools

May 24, 1900
Republicans vote no in referendum for constitutional convention in Virginia, designed to create a new state constitution disenfranchising African-Americans

January 15, 1901
Republican Booker T. Washington protests Alabama Democratic Party’s refusal to permit voting by African-Americans

October 16, 1901
President Theodore Roosevelt invites Booker T. Washington to dine at White House, sparking protests by Democrats across the country

May 29, 1902
Virginia Democrats implement new state constitution, condemned by Republicans as illegal, reducing African-American voter registration by 86%

February 12, 1909
On 100th anniversary of Abraham Lincoln’s birth, African-American Republicans and women’s suffragists Ida Wells and Mary Terrell co-found the NAACP

June 18, 1912
African-American Robert Church, founder of Lincoln Leagues to register black voters in Tennessee, attends 1912 Republican National Convention as delegate; eventually serves as delegate at 8 conventions

August 1, 1916
Republican presidential candidate Charles Evans Hughes, former New York Governor and U.S. Supreme Court Justice, endorses women’s suffrage constitutional amendment; he would become Secretary of State and Chief Justice

May 21, 1919
Republican House passes constitutional amendment granting women the vote with 85% of Republicans in favor, but only 54% of Democrats; in Senate, 80% of Republicans would vote yes, but almost half of Democrats no

April 18, 1920
Minnesota’s FIRST-in-the-nation anti-lynching law, promoted by African-American Republican Nellie Francis, signed by Republican Gov. Jacob Preus

August 18, 1920
Republican-authored 19th Amendment, giving women the vote, becomes part of Constitution; 26 of the 36 states to ratify had Republican-controlled legislatures

January 26, 1922
House passes bill authored by U.S. Rep. Leonidas Dyer (R-MO) making lynching a federal crime; Senate Democrats block it with filibuster

June 2, 1924
Republican President Calvin Coolidge signs bill passed by Republican Congress granting U.S. citizenship to all Native Americans

October 3, 1924
Republicans denounce three-time Democrat presidential nominee William Jennings Bryan for defending the Ku Klux Klan at 1924 Democratic National Convention

December 8, 1924
Democratic presidential candidate John W. Davis argues in favor of “separate but equal”

June 12, 1929
First Lady Lou Hoover invites wife of U.S. Rep. Oscar De Priest (R-IL), an African-American, to tea at the White House, sparking protests by Democrats across the country

August 17, 1937
Republicans organize opposition to former Ku Klux Klansman and Democrat U.S. Senator Hugo Black, appointed to U.S. Supreme Court by FDR; his Klan background was hidden until after confirmation

June 24, 1940
Republican Party platform calls for integration of the armed forces; for the balance of his terms in office, FDR refuses to order it

October 20, 1942
60 prominent African-Americans issue Durham Manifesto, calling on southern Democrats to abolish their all-white primaries

April 3, 1944
U.S. Supreme Court strikes down Texas Democratic Party’s “whites only” primary election system

February 18, 1946
Appointed by Republican President Calvin Coolidge, federal judge Paul McCormick ends segregation of Mexican-American children in California public schools

July 11, 1952
Republican Party platform condemns “duplicity and insincerity” of Democrats in racial matters

September 30, 1953
Earl Warren, California’s three-term Republican Governor and 1948 Republican vice presidential nominee, nominated to be Chief Justice; wrote landmark decision in Brown v. Board of Education

December 8, 1953
Eisenhower administration Asst. Attorney General Lee Rankin argues for plaintiffs in Brown v. Board of Education

May 17, 1954
Chief Justice Earl Warren, three-term Republican Governor (CA) and Republican vice presidential nominee in 1948, wins unanimous support of Supreme Court for school desegregation in Brown v. Board of Education

November 25, 1955
Eisenhower administration bans racial segregation of interstate bus travel

March 12, 1956
Ninety-seven Democrats in Congress condemn Supreme Court’s decision in Brown v. Board of Education, and pledge to continue segregation

June 5, 1956
Republican federal judge Frank Johnson rules in favor of Rosa Parks in decision striking down “blacks in the back of the bus” law

October 19, 1956
On campaign trail, Vice President Richard Nixon vows: “American boys and girls shall sit, side by side, at any school – public or private – with no regard paid to the color of their skin. Segregation, discrimination, and prejudice have no place in America”

November 6, 1956
African-American civil rights leaders Martin Luther King and Ralph Abernathy vote for Republican Dwight Eisenhower for President

September 9, 1957
President Dwight Eisenhower signs Republican Party’s 1957 Civil Rights Act

September 24, 1957
Sparking criticism from Democrats such as Senators John Kennedy and Lyndon Johnson, President Dwight Eisenhower deploys the 82nd Airborne Division to Little Rock, AR to force Democrat Governor Orval Faubus to integrate public schools

June 23, 1958
President Dwight Eisenhower meets with Martin Luther King and other African-American leaders to discuss plans to advance civil rights

February 4, 1959
President Eisenhower informs Republican leaders of his plan to introduce 1960 Civil Rights Act, despite staunch opposition from many Democrats

May 6, 1960
President Dwight Eisenhower signs Republicans’ Civil Rights Act of 1960, overcoming 125-hour, around-the-clock filibuster by 18 Senate Democrats

July 27, 1960
At Republican National Convention, Vice President and eventual presidential nominee Richard Nixon insists on strong civil rights plank in platform

May 2, 1963
Republicans condemn Democrat sheriff of Birmingham, AL for arresting over 2,000 African-American schoolchildren marching for their civil rights

June 1, 1963
Democrat Governor George Wallace announces defiance of court order issued by Republican federal judge Frank Johnson to integrate University of Alabama

September 29, 1963
Gov. George Wallace (D-AL) defies order by U.S. District Judge Frank Johnson, appointed by President Dwight Eisenhower, to integrate Tuskegee High School

June 9, 1964
Republicans condemn 14-hour filibuster against 1964 Civil Rights Act by U.S. Senator and former Ku Klux Klansman Robert Byrd (D-WV), who still serves in the Senate

June 10, 1964
Senate Minority Leader Everett Dirksen (R-IL) criticizes Democrat filibuster against 1964 Civil Rights Act, calls on Democrats to stop opposing racial equality

The Civil Rights Act of 1964 was introduced and approved by a staggering majority of Republicans in the Senate. The Act was opposed by most southern Democrat senators, several of whom were proud segregationists—one of them being Al Gore Sr. Democrat President Lyndon B. Johnson relied on Illinois Senator Everett Dirkson, the Republican leader from Illinois, to get the Act passed.

June 20, 1964
The Chicago Defender, renowned African-American newspaper, praises Senate Republican Leader Everett Dirksen (R-IL) for leading passage of 1964 Civil Rights Act

March 7, 1965
Police under the command of Democrat Governor George Wallace attack African-Americans demonstrating for voting rights in Selma, AL

March 21, 1965
Republican federal judge Frank Johnson authorizes Martin Luther King’s protest march from Selma to Montgomery, overruling Democrat Governor George Wallace

August 4, 1965
Senate Republican Leader Everett Dirksen (R-IL) overcomes Democrat attempts to block 1965 Voting Rights Act; 94% of Senate Republicans vote for landmark civil right legislation, while 27% of Democrats oppose

August 6, 1965
Voting Rights Act of 1965, abolishing literacy tests and other measures devised by Democrats to prevent African-Americans from voting, signed into law; higher percentage of Republicans than Democrats vote in favor

July 8, 1970
In special message to Congress, President Richard Nixon calls for reversal of policy of forced termination of Native American rights and benefits

September 17, 1971
Former Ku Klux Klan member and Democrat U.S. Senator Hugo Black (D-AL) retires from U.S. Supreme Court; appointed by FDR in 1937, he had defended Klansmen for racial murders

February 19, 1976
President Gerald Ford formally rescinds President Franklin Roosevelt’s notorious Executive Order authorizing internment of over 120,000 Japanese-Americans during WWII

September 15, 1981
President Ronald Reagan establishes the White House Initiative on Historically Black Colleges and Universities, to increase African-American participation in federal education programs

June 29, 1982
President Ronald Reagan signs 25-year extension of 1965 Voting Rights Act

August 10, 1988
President Ronald Reagan signs Civil Liberties Act of 1988, compensating Japanese-Americans for deprivation of civil rights and property during World War II internment ordered by FDR

November 21, 1991
President George H. W. Bush signs Civil Rights Act of 1991 to strengthen federal civil rights legislation

August 20, 1996
Bill authored by U.S. Rep. Susan Molinari (R-NY) to prohibit racial discrimination in adoptions, part of Republicans’ Contract With America, becomes law

April 26, 1999
Legislation authored by U.S. Senator Spencer Abraham (R-MI) awarding Congressional Gold Medal to civil rights pioneer Rosa Parks is transmitted to President

January 25, 2001
U.S. Senate Republican Policy Committee declares school choice to be “Educational Emancipation”

March 19, 2003
Republican U.S. Representatives of Hispanic and Portuguese descent form Congressional Hispanic Conference

May 23, 2003
U.S. Senator Sam Brownback (R-KS) introduces bill to establish National Museum of African American History and Culture

February 26, 2004
Hispanic Republican U.S. Rep. Henry Bonilla (R-TX) condemns racist comments by U.S. Rep. Corrine Brown (D-FL); she had called Asst. Secretary of State Roger Noriega and several Hispanic Congressmen “a bunch of white men...you all look alike to me”

Are there racists in the Republican party, likely - that's a lot of people so there's bound to be a few bad apples in the bunch. However, in comparing Democrats to Republicans over the last 150 years which one has a systemic, widespread support of slavery and racism? Which party, to this day, has members of the KKK still serving in the U.S. Senate? Which party has members that throw oreos at blacks and call them "House Niggas"?

[ November 04, 2005, 06:26 PM: Message edited by: Gary ]

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KnightEnder
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quote:
What do you think would have happened if a Republican threw oreo cookies at Steele? Would the NAACP have defended it? They defended the Democrats ...
Where does it say the NAACP defends democrats throwing oreo's at Steele? I read the story and I must have missed that. Or is that a lie?

KE

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KnightEnder
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From page 2 of the story Gary linked:
quote:
A spokesman for the Maryland Democratic Party denounced the depiction as being "extremely offensive" and having "no place in politics or in any other aspect of public discourse," The Washington Post reported. Democrats have denied any connection to the News Blog.
Still, Mfume spokesman Joseph P. Trippi said Mr. Steele opens himself to such criticism by defending Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. for holding a Republican fundraiser in July at the all-white Elkridge Club in Baltimore.
"The facts are the facts. Ehrlich went to that country club, and Steele said it didn't bother him," Mr. Trippi said. "I think that says something ... and should be part of this debate."

Now you know, the rest of the story...

KE

[ November 05, 2005, 07:54 AM: Message edited by: KnightEnder ]

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KnightEnder
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quote:
The party you describe is horrible, but I hardly see why this is more cynical and racist than the "pimps and hos" parties that have been popular over the country, including among "progressives," for several years now.
Now I feel bad. I went to one of those party/club deals about five years ago. But man did Stacy and the women there look good. That's how they get you. They use sex to mess with your mind. How am I supposed to stay focussed on the explotation of the black man when there are women of all races running around half-naked? Oh, and I was a Republican back then. [Smile] (Not really. I was a nothing back then. Recently I have noticed, and been appalled by the fact that television and modern culture has turned pimps into "heros", but back then I didn't think about it at all. [Frown]

KE

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johnson
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The Highland Park kids aren't all bad. I knew a number of them when I went to SMU. Typical upper-middle-class white Midwestern-type kids.
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Gary
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quote:
Originally posted by KnightEnder:
quote:
What do you think would have happened if a Republican threw oreo cookies at Steele? Would the NAACP have defended it? They defended the Democrats ...
Where does it say the NAACP defends democrats throwing oreo's at Steele? I read the story and I must have missed that. Or is that a lie?

KE

Ahh the accusation of lying - always comes up when dealing with the left. I suspect the dishonesty the left routinely engages in (e.g. forged memos at CBS) leads you to believe it's prevalent in others as well.

The part of the story I based that on was this:
quote:
"There is a difference between pointing out the obvious and calling someone names," said a campaign spokesman for Kweisi Mfume, a Democratic candidate for U.S. Senate and former president of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People.
I misread that and thought it was the actual statement of NAACP. What can I say, I ain't perfect. Of course, since you insist on the dishonesty of others with opposing views, I doubt I will get the benefit of the doubt - any mistake must be characterized as lies else how can you demonize others?

However, I would very much like to see you (or anyone really) provide the NAACP's statement regarding this. I can't seem to locate anything at their site or on Google - maybe I'm just missing it? You'd think the NAACP would be all over this with condemnations, wouldn't you? I suppose if you find one that I was unable to find, I must be lying about that too?

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Pete at Home
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In my defense, Gary, I didn't say you were lying. I said you were full of crap. You understand the distinction, right? I meant that I fear you actually believe that crap, that Democrats are solely responsible for racism in this country.

If you were remotely fair about this, you'd recognize that in most states, that NAACP psychopath would never be allowed on a Democratic ticket, and that he represents the extreme nutball fringe of my party. You give people like him more credibility when you paint his views as mainstream Democrat. That leads me to believe that you care more about fighting the Democratic party than you care about fighting racism, and that's a sad thing, Gary.

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KnightEnder
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You lie, I call you on it, and somehow that's my flaw? Nice world you live in. Try being a man and just saying; Sorry, I made a mistake. Then shut up and don't compound your error by showing that you don't actually mean your sorry.

And Pete is correct, your obvious attempt at blaming the democrats for all societies ills makes it hard for those of us that agree with you concerning the obvious racism to take you seriously, much less support your selfserving conclusions. In fact, I think your attempt at villifying the democratic party detracts from the atrocious racism of a few individuals or organizations. You sir, aren't one of those useful idiots I hear so much about, are you?

KE

[ November 05, 2005, 01:34 PM: Message edited by: KnightEnder ]

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Gary
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quote:
Originally posted by KnightEnder:
You lie, I call you on it, and somehow that's my flaw? Nice world you live in. Try being a man and just saying; Sorry, I made a mistake. Then shut up and don't compound your error by showing that you don't actually mean your sorry.

Well KE, I did say I made a mistake. Your attempt to focus in on one minor mistake (that I readily admitted to) and ignore the massive amount of historical information I provided showing the Democratic party's history of racism over the last 150 years is the height of intellectual dishonesty. Your claim of lying is the only lie so far on this thread. Being dishonest in an effort to claim dishonesty in others is childish and hypocritical, I exepcted more from you.

What is your response to the facts or are you limited to insult and the politics of personal destruction? Do you have anything substantive to say or is name calling your only option here? When someone devolves to the level you've gone to, it usually means you lost the debate on the facts and the logic so you appeal to emotion and personal attacks. Is that the case here? I'm willing to give you the benefit of the doubt you would deny me and see if you can climb out of the gutter one last time.

I'm still waiting on you to provide the NAACP response - where is it? Could we not take their silence as consent to these overt acts of racism? Why is the NAACP looking the other way on this you think? Why does the Democratic party have a 150+ year history of opposing civil rights and have so much overt racism coming from their ranks today?

quote:
Originally posted by Pete at Home:
In my defense, Gary, I didn't say you were lying. I said you were full of crap. You understand the distinction, right? I meant that I fear you actually believe that crap, that Democrats are solely responsible for racism in this country.

I think your distinction is full of crap. If you feel the need to backpedal on it and try to defend it, perhaps you are coming to the same conclusion?

I'm saying the Democrats are responsible for a significant amount of today's racism and for the historical propogation of it. I'm not just throwing it out as unsupported opinion either - I provided a tremendous amount of evidence going back nearly 150 years to present day to back that claim up.

Your rebuttal is only that I'm "full of crap". That may make you feel better but it doesn't really address any of the facts does it? Do you have any response to the questions I list above or will you simply dismiss them as "full of crap" again?

And for that matter, are such phrases as "No shame for the rich whiteys?" considered racist by you? It would be by me and I think most would recognize the racism inherent in that rhetorical question. Anybody know who said that? Zyne in the first post on this thread - a Democrat. Why would she think such a racist comment was acceptable? Why has none of you Democrats here commented on it?

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Lewkowski
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I think schools have done a horrible job of educating the youth of America.

Every student in school should answer "The Democratic party" when asked "What party has traditionally stood behind racism as being ok."

Or "Which party opposed the Civil rights act?"

Or "Which party *currently* believes not all races should be treated equal by the government?"

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KnightEnder
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Yeah, I usually think more of you too, but on this matter, and in particular in relation to the side issue of you making things up to bolster your case, and then admiting "making a mistake" but then trying to justify it, you are really full of it.

And now you are compounding your "mistakes" by whining and being childish. You admitted to lying (being wrong, making a mistake, whatever) then you accuse me of lying because I questioned your statement? I don't lie, ever here. (For a lot of reasons; it's too easy to be caught, it is a waste of time, it goes against my personal code, and I expect people to believe me when I say something) And if I make a mistake, I admit my mistake and apologize. So, yes, you should expect more from me, I've spent years building up a reputation for honesty so that when I say something people believe me.

So, enough of this, I'll let the members decide who made the false statements here.

As for addressing the issue, I'll say this; racism by anybody is wrong. However, as I said; you are blurring the issue with political biased rhetoric instead of discussing the issue. This is an issue that should be addressed by the parents and the school should have sent the kids in deragatory clothing home to change. We are not far enough removed from "real" racism to allow our children to think it is funny.

KE

[ November 07, 2005, 01:12 PM: Message edited by: KnightEnder ]

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Everard
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Its very convienent in gary's list that legislation signed by republican presidents is listed as being signed by republican presidents, but legislation signed by democratic presidents is listed as being sponsored by republicans.

There's a lot of other deceit going on in the list, but, I'll start with pointing out one and see if it registers.

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Gary
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quote:
Originally posted by KnightEnder:
Yeah, I usually think more of you too, but on this matter, and in particular in relation to the side issue of you making things up to bolster your case, and then admiting "making a mistake" but then trying to justify it, you are really full of it.

I'm not trying to justify it, I just admitted it and explained how I made the mistake. If you need to believe I'm lying, well, go ahead. If it makes you feel better, I'm here for you. [Razz]
quote:
Originally posted by KnightEnder:

So, enough of this, I'll let the members decide who made the false statements here.

Me too.

quote:
Originally posted by KnightEnder:

As for addressing the issue, I'll say this; racism by anybody is wrong. However, as I said; you are blurring the issue with political biased rhetoric instead of discussing the issue. This is an issue that should be addressed by the parents and the school should have sent the kids in deragatory clothing home to change. We are not far enough removed from "real" racism to allow our children to think it is funny.

KE

Those are nice platitudes but you're still ducking all the questions and facts I've raised. Are you ever going to respond to them?

quote:
Originally posted by everard:
Its very convienent in gary's list that legislation signed by republican presidents is listed as being signed by republican presidents, but legislation signed by democratic presidents is listed as being sponsored by republicans.

It's also very convenient that you offer such a broad generality without any example or even trying to back it up. I see where you're going with it and there could be some point to it but you fail to provide any substance anyone can work with. Perhaps you have a similar list? It would be very interesting to compare/contrast your list with the one I provided.


quote:
Originally posted by everard:

There's a lot of other deceit going on in the list, but, I'll start with pointing out one and see if it registers.

Again you provide such broad generality without any attempt to even back it up that it's hard to even begin to see your point other than you wich to build the case I'm doing something deceitful. Don't rely on baseless innuendo, throw out what you think is wrong and we can address it.

I have provided over 150 years of context - from the founding of the Republican party to provide an alternative to pro-slavery Democrats up to present day. Can you provide a similar historical context?

I keep asking the Democrats here to address the facts and provide something, anything, refuting the facts I listed. Instead I get unfounded and unproven personal attacks and broad based opinion devoid of substance that does not address the facts I provide in any way whatsoever. Would it be too much for you guys to believe that the Democratic party truly has a historical problem when it comes to racism that is alive and well today? The first step is admitting you have a problem ...

Given that, at least to this point, I have proven that the above is true (there's no evidence to the contrary), I think it's interesting to discuss why black Americans are so supportive of the Democratic party. Why would blacks be almost 100% supportive of a party that has done everything it could to over the last 150 years to prevent their equality?

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