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Author Topic: Steak, what's the best?
potemkyn
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Delmonico or the Ribeye. Best piece of meat around. Marbilized fat gives it extra good flavoring. I've had some sumptuous steaks that are Ribeyes.

Of course it's only good if it's charcoal grilled and cooked to the point where it won't moo.

Anyone else have a favorite steak? Tis the season, I suppose.

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OpsanusTau
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I just ate a ribeye last night.

...yum.

And I have to say, for those of you who have never branched out from cornfed cattle, you should at some point in your life find a way to eat a buffalo steak, grassfed, grilled nicely rare with just a hint of ginger.

Plus, it's patriotic; what could be more American than American Bison?

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Eric
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Buffalo!

Gotta be careful cooking it, though. The near absence of fat makes it dry out easily.

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Eric
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Damn, Ops, you beat me to it!
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OpsanusTau
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Hooray!
Buffalo!

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Everard
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The sirloin strip is better then the rib eye, in my opinion... especially if you get the second and third steaks. (1-4 inches from the meeting of the sirloin with the rib). These two steaks have awesome flavor, and better tenderness then the ribeye.

Short cut of the rump. The first 2 1/2 inches off of the Top Butt, or Sirloin Shell. These steaks have the best flavor on the cow, and are almost as tender as a good rib eye.

If you can, get your meat dry aged. This process tenderizes the meat, as well as giving it an extra "buttery" flavor.

For a slow cooked treat, get a rack of beef back ribs... you know those baby back ribs you're so fond of? This is the beef version. You can often find them for a dollar per pound. A full rack is around 3 lbs, and has about 1.5 lbs of meat on it. If you barbeque these properly, they are out of this world.

The american pallet is not used to grass-fed cattle. Its more "gamey" then corn-fed. My recommendation is to find wolfe's neck beef as a transition... they raise their cattle on a mixture of corn and potato peels, which adds some of the "yellow" fat you get from grass, but without altering the flavor beyond what you'll be comfortable with.

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vulture
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Sirloin or Chateaubriand, blue (extremely rare for those who don't know). Soft as butter and absolutely gorgeous, particularly when it has been well matured.

I like my steaks still chewing the cud [Smile]

[ July 04, 2006, 02:27 PM: Message edited by: vulture ]

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RickyB
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I'm also partial to the sirloin, and also the entrecote. These are the two cuts I go with at my favorite butcher's. He's the best in the Tel Aviv Metro area (that I know of, at least) and his steaks have never really failed me. I did a cookout for one of the World Cup games a cuple of weeks ago, and I got some steaks, and every bite had those primordial centers in my brain sighing with that relief of a need being filled just the right way. [Smile]

I think the beef we get here is grass fed - it comes from Argentina, mostly.

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Dagonee
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I think I've got to go with the tenderloin here.

Not original, but there's a reason for that. [Smile]

If you can find a butcher that will sell prime, it's worth it on special occasions. But in many markets there's just none available except to restaurants.

For a cheap steak, a skirt steak done right - on a really hot cast iron pan (probably on a grill unless your stove is not consumer grade) with a good fajita marinade can't be beat, even if you don't use it for fajitas.

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KnightEnder
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Stacy says filet. And since she orders my food I have to agree. And I like mine extremely rare. According to a friend who manages Papa's Steak House that is the only way to truly taste the steak.

I've eaten at Morton's in DC, Ruth Chris's all over, and Papa's and Papa's was the best. However, they all were great. Steak is kinda like sex like that. [Smile]

KE

[ July 04, 2006, 07:23 PM: Message edited by: KnightEnder ]

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cperry
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Isn't the Delmonico the same as a ribeye?
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Everard
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Delmonico and the ribeye are teh same.

I'm not a fan of tenderloin (filet). Very little beef flavor.

Dagonee is correct about skirt steak, although the price on that is going up

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KnightEnder
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Filet is the most expensive and cut on any menu and the tenderest. Of course taste vary. I've always had expensive taste. However, combined with my income that's a bad combination. [Frown]

KE

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Everard
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Yeah, filet is the most expensive, and the tenderest... but thats about it. If you want BEEF, which is what grilling is about, then you don't want tenderloin...A sirloin or rib eye is far more beefy, and still very tender if you prepare it right.

The only time I'm a fan of tenderloin is if I'm cooking indoors, and trying to impress a woman.

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potemkyn
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The last time I purchased a Delmonico, there were other steaks to its left which were labeled as Ribeyes. They were cheaper, but not as thick. Could just be the store.

Ev,

Is the sirloin a pretty lean cut of meat?

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flydye45
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I thought the Delmonico was a specific cut from the ribeye.
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flydye45
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Wiki.


quote:
Delmonico steak alternately steak Delmonico refers to both a cut of beef and a presentation of steak dinner prepared from it, made world famous by Delmonico's Restaurant in New York City during the mid 1800's.

The original Delmonico steak, is considered to be a boneless top sirloin that is almost 2 inches thick with delicate marbling and cooked rare to well done, depending on the request of the diner. However, over the years it has generally been considered to be a club steak from the short loin of beef prepared as a boneless, very rare steak considered to be one of the finest, most tender and tasty cuts available in New York.

Although Delmonico's steak may now refer to different cuts, prepared different ways, in different parts of the country, it is known to represent a wider variety of beef cuts that may be broiled, fried, or grilled. Some of the steak cuts now commonly referred to as Delmonico steak include:

a bone-in top loin steak (a triangular-shaped, short loin cut, some suggesting the first cut of the top loin next to the rib end) also known as a club steak, country club steak, shell steak, and strip loin steak;
a boneless or bone-in rib-eye steak (some insist it is a rib cut closest to the front end of the ribs while others say any rib-eye);
a boneless top loin steak (also known as a New York strip steak, Kansas City steak, strip loin, ambassador, boneless club, hotel or veiny steak); or
a boneless top sirloin.
In addition to the steak, the original meal also included a potato dish, known as Delmonico's potatoes, that was prepared by making a baked mashed potatoes-like dish topped with grated cheese and buttered breadcrumbs. The dish was then baked until golden brown and served steaming.

Retrieved from "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Delmonico_steak"


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Cytania
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Herefordshire - lovely sweet grassy taste.

Aberdeen - strong salty fatty taste, gorgeous.

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cperry
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I prefer the flavor of ribeye to filet, even though the filet is supposed to be a better piece of meat.
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cperry
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BTW, thanks, Flydye,for the info.
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Everard
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"Ev,

Is the sirloin a pretty lean cut of meat?"

The sirloin strip steak is, internally, actually leaner then the tenderloin. Sirloin, tenderloin, and top and bottom round, are all lean cuts of meat. Shoulder, chuck, ribeye, are all fattier cuts of meat.

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Koner
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I prefer to get all of the beef I eat from my father. All of his cows spend their entire lives roaming around 160 acres of grassland eating nothing but Alfalfa and June Clover. They used to get corn silage but he stopped feeding that several years ago.

As far as which cut is the best, I prefer the ribeye to any other.

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Richard Dey
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Porterhouse and Bernais.
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Koner
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A porterhouse is both the T-bone and ribeye combined isn't it?

I had the mose amazing porterhouse with a bernais suace and potatoes augratin in Paris a few years back. It was in a very nice place on the river near Notre Dame. I had the yummiest bottle of Cabernet Sauvignon with it. Man its making my mouth water just thinking about it.

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Everard
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Porterhouse is the strip steak and the tenderloin.
T-Bone is the strip steak.

A t-bone will have SOME filet on it, but usually very little, while a porterhouse has a full sized filet on it.

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Dagonee
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The best beef I ever had was on a plate with the best pork I ever had. It was Kobe beef, aged and prepared with a wild mushroom sauce. The pork was made with forbidden rice. In both cases, the meat flavor was very strong even with the other flavors.

I'd had kobe beef many times before that, and never noticed anything particularly different. I get the impression that there's kobe beef and then Kobe beef.

It was at some ridiculously fancy restaurant we went to for our anniversary.

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RickyB
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I'm dying to try Kobe beef :-) See what the damn fuss is about...
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cperry
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What is forbidden rice?
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javelin
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That's forbidden knowledge, cperry. Sorry.
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cperry
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LOL
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Dagonee
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quote:
Forbidden rice is a short-grained, heirloom rice that is black when raw and dark purple when cooked. The name comes from the legend that it was reserved for emperors in ancient China because of its nutritiousness and rarity. This grain is high in fiber and has a deep, nutty taste.

Forbidden rice has recently appeared on the shelves of health food stores in the Western United States along with other heirloom rices such as Bhutanese Red Rice and Wild rice, particularly in California. It is popular with vegetarians and vegans because it has a favorable nutrition profile. Desire for non-genetically modified foods has also contributed to demand for this rice.

The deep color of black forbidden rice suggests the presence of phytonutrients. It has a relatively high mineral content (including iron) and, like most rice, supplies several important amino acids.

Another theory of why forbidden rice was ever forbidden was that when the Greeks took over the Middle East, they had it banned due to the belief that it was being used by their enemies to aid them in battle.

When cooked, "forbidden rice" has the smell of freshly popped popcorn and turns the water that it is boiling in a brilliant purple color.

From Wikipedia.
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javelin
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And now Dagonee must be eliminated, along with anyone who read his post. Prepare to meet Guido.
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maniacal_engineer
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I went to a really nice restarount in western Tokyo that was an old Yokohama half-timber dockside building from the meiji or maybe even tokugawa period that was moved to a mountaintop where it now sits. There were a bunch (two) of sumo (two is a bunch when it comes to sumo) there, and it was really expensive. I was along translating. They did a teppanyaki thing with a filet of kobe beef wrapped in bacon and it was exquisite.
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Dagonee
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quote:
Originally posted by javelin:
And now Dagonee must be eliminated, along with anyone who read his post. Prepare to meet Guido.

You wouldn't say that if you'd ever tried my cooking.

Cooking is a manly art. There's fire. There's knives. There's cool gadgets. There's dead animals.

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javelin
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I'm sure I'd enjoy your good cooking. Unfortunately, since you've revealed the secret of forbidden rice, I shall never have the opportunity. It's a tragedy, really.
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Everard
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"Cooking is a manly art. There's fire. There's knives. There's cool gadgets. There's dead animals."

[Big Grin]

This is my new motto.

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maniacal_engineer
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"Cooking is a manly art. There's fire. There's knives. There's cool gadgets. There's dead animals."

In the immortal words of count ruger "well spoken sir"

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Dagonee
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quote:
Originally posted by javelin:
I'm sure I'd enjoy your good cooking. Unfortunately, since you've revealed the secret of forbidden rice, I shall never have the opportunity. It's a tragedy, really.

You forget. I have knives. And fire.

They'll never lay a finger on me. [Big Grin]

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