Ornery.org
  Front Page   |   About Ornery.org   |   World Watch   |   Guest Essays   |   Contact Us

The Ornery American Forum Post New Topic  Post A Reply
my profile login | register | search | faq | forum home

  next oldest topic   next newest topic
» The Ornery American Forum » General Comments » A curious hatred (Page 3)

 - UBBFriend: Email this page to someone!   This topic comprises 3 pages: 1  2  3   
Author Topic: A curious hatred
LinuxFreakus
Member
Member # 2395

 - posted      Profile for LinuxFreakus     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by EDanaII:
LOL! Me too, Jav, me too...


@ LinuxFreakus:

No, LF, true to your fashion, you really didn't listen.

Consider this scenario: someone you love is dying. You're not a doctor so, there is little you can do. Basic human nature does not mean that you, as a logical person, just sit around and do nothing. Basic human nature dictates that you DO something, if only to ease the emotional turmoil you are facing.

Do you understand the point here? (Somehow, I doubt it. [Smile] )

What do you do when you need to do something about something you can do nothing about? [Smile]

If you do nothing, you're left to focus on how horrible you're feeling. That ain't a good feeling.

So, what do you do? How do you manage such horrible feelings? What do you do to keep them from tying your body up into a knot, or ulcerating your stomach, raising your blood pressure or, even, causing heart palpitations.

One solution is to talk to others. Sharing how you feel with others and earning their empathy is a perfectly rational thing to do to help you relieve the stress that you are experiencing. This may not save your loved one's life, but it certainly helps you cope with the trauma. This is perfectly rational.

Another is to demonstrate to your loved one that they mean something to you. That they are important to you and your life. This may not save their life, but it can't hurt, and it just might give them the reason they need to fight for their life. This is perfectly rational.

Now, let's talk about doctors. Sometimes, not even they can help the dying. But, sometimes, they offer placebos, or experimental surgeries that can give them hope. This is perfectly rational.

Prayer is no different. In praying, you are talking to someone else, even if fictional. In praying, you are demonstrating, if not directly, to that person that they mean something to you. In praying, you are in effect, engaging in a form of "experimental surgery" that can't hurt, costs nothing, and, if there truly is a God, may actually help.

These are all perfectly rational actions.

Ed.

Wrong. The act of praying would only be logical if there was any conceivable way to test whether your appeal to the supernatural has any sort of effect on anything. Clearly we cannot do this, and it is therefore an unneeded complication, or an extra layer which encapsulates what you actually want to do.

Furthermore (and I freely admit I have no studies, etc to back this up) I contend that prayer/ religious faith may actually be harmful to a person's mental health because said person might never learn effective ways of managing their actions, emotions, urges, etc., because they are instead relying on something untestable and unknowable while they are under the false impresson that it is absolute fact because they believe it as a matter of "faith" or whatever you want to call it.

Obviously, this wouldn't happen with everyone because I think a lot of (I would like to think MOST) people are smart enough to realize the reality of the situation even if they do not want to conciously acknowledge it. The particularly devout followers could have problems like this.

This part about it being harmful is my own feeling on the matter, and like I said I have not tried to find data to support this notion, so there is no need to get really upset about this part. I am willing to concede that I might be off base with that portion.

There is, however, no question that the act of prayer is fundamentally illogical, untestable, and completely useless.

Posts: 1240 | Registered: Apr 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
LinuxFreakus
Member
Member # 2395

 - posted      Profile for LinuxFreakus     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by javelin:
quote:
There are no cases where praying "does" anything.
My god man. Once again, I'm done with you. It's really quite sad and frustrating.
Yes, I'm sure its frustrating to know you can't think of anything that will effectively refute this notion.
Posts: 1240 | Registered: Apr 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Funean
Member
Member # 2345

 - posted      Profile for Funean   Email Funean   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
The comfort and perhaps mental focus on whatever matter is at hand experienced by people who pray have an effect on the practitioner. Effects such as better performance on mental tasks, lowered respiration/blood pressure and other results are certainly as measurable as the effects of, say, sleep or other actions taken by a subject.

I contest, therefore, the notion that all purported results of an act of prayer are untestable and that the act is "completely useless."

If you'd like to restrict your statements to disputing the ability to prove that prayers are granted, your argument makes a bit more sense and comes across as considerably less supercilious than it does now.

Posts: 5277 | Registered: Mar 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Jordan
Member
Member # 2159

 - posted      Profile for Jordan   Email Jordan   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
What's more, Funean, he'd be perfectly correct in saying that nobody has measured prayer "doing" anything, in that context. Otherwise everyone would be rushing to join my religion, since it's the right one.

Hey, I'm just teasing y'all. [Wink]

Posts: 2147 | Registered: Nov 2004  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Funean
Member
Member # 2345

 - posted      Profile for Funean   Email Funean   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Jordan, promise me your religion requires pink drinks with umbrellas and high heels, and I'm there.

[Smile]

Posts: 5277 | Registered: Mar 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
LinuxFreakus
Member
Member # 2395

 - posted      Profile for LinuxFreakus     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Funean:
The comfort and perhaps mental focus on whatever matter is at hand experienced by people who pray have an effect on the practitioner. Effects such as better performance on mental tasks, lowered respiration/blood pressure and other results are certainly as measurable as the effects of, say, sleep or other actions taken by a subject.

I contest, therefore, the notion that all purported results of an act of prayer are untestable and that the act is "completely useless."

If you'd like to restrict your statements to disputing the ability to prove that prayers are granted, your argument makes a bit more sense and comes across as considerably less supercilious than it does now.

"Prayer" is not causing those effects though. You can do the same thing without having it be based on anything untestable or illogical, therefore I need not make any such restriction. What happens is that people pray, and then incorrectly confuse correlation with causality.
Posts: 1240 | Registered: Apr 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
canadian
Member
Member # 1809

 - posted      Profile for canadian   Email canadian       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
What did he mean, "slow of mind?"...
Posts: 5362 | Registered: Jun 2004  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Pete at Home
Member
Member # 429

 - posted      Profile for Pete at Home   Email Pete at Home   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by LinuxFreakus:
quote:
Originally posted by Funean:
The comfort and perhaps mental focus on whatever matter is at hand experienced by people who pray have an effect on the practitioner. Effects such as better performance on mental tasks, lowered respiration/blood pressure and other results are certainly as measurable as the effects of, say, sleep or other actions taken by a subject.

I contest, therefore, the notion that all purported results of an act of prayer are untestable and that the act is "completely useless."

If you'd like to restrict your statements to disputing the ability to prove that prayers are granted, your argument makes a bit more sense and comes across as considerably less supercilious than it does now.

"Prayer" is not causing those effects though. You can do the same thing without having it be based on anything untestable or illogical, therefore I need not make any such restriction. What happens is that people pray, and then incorrectly confuse correlation with causality.
Your "logic" is circular. You base your argument that prayer is illogical on the basis that "You can do the same thing without having it be based on anything untestable or illogical, therefore I need not make any such restriction."

Try again, without basing your condemnation of prayer on an obvious logical fallacy? Perhaps you'd like to try a more subtle logical fallacy, or maybe actual logic this time?

Posts: 44193 | Registered: Jun 2001  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
EDanaII
Member
Member # 1062

 - posted      Profile for EDanaII   Email EDanaII   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Pete? We should probably take this one out of this thread. Just a thought...
Posts: 3504 | Registered: May 2003  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
kenmeer livermaile
Member
Member # 2243

 - posted      Profile for kenmeer livermaile   Email kenmeer livermaile       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
What did he mean, "slow of mind?"...

I don't know. I'm thinking about it. gtive me some time. Maybe a week?

Posts: 23297 | Registered: Jan 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
scifibum
Member
Member # 945

 - posted      Profile for scifibum   Email scifibum   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
0Meg...i want to let you know that there's a very good chance you can get over your differences with your stepbrother. My brothers and I fought constantly and many bitter, hateful things were said, and on not a few occasions we tried to solve disputes with our fists (luckily we were all crappy fighters so we didn't land any really damaging punches). I think there were years when "hatred" would have been the best term to describe our feelings.

But we're all getting along great now. It's amazing what a little time and distance can do.

So...my advice is endure, avoid, and disengage. Move out ASAP. The hatred will fade quickly once this guy is no longer a big part of your life.

Posts: 6847 | Registered: Mar 2003  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Pete at Home
Member
Member # 429

 - posted      Profile for Pete at Home   Email Pete at Home   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Who said "slow of mind"?

Ed? It wasn't me that said "slow of mind." I don't know what they are talking about. I just pointed out a classic logical fallacy.

Posts: 44193 | Registered: Jun 2001  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
EDanaII
Member
Member # 1062

 - posted      Profile for EDanaII   Email EDanaII   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
@ LinuxFreakus

My response is here .

Posts: 3504 | Registered: May 2003  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
EDanaII
Member
Member # 1062

 - posted      Profile for EDanaII   Email EDanaII   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
@ Pete at Home

You've got eMail.

Posts: 3504 | Registered: May 2003  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
KnightEnder
unregistered


 - posted            Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
A fine line between love and hate? Mind over matter. If you stop minding, it won't matter. Isn't that what gruevy said?

KE

IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Jesse
Member
Member # 1860

 - posted      Profile for Jesse   Email Jesse   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Omeg.

Stupid hasn't got a thing to do with your brothers treatment of you. You may dislike him because you consider him stupid, just as he may dislike you because he considers you weak.

However, plenty of highly intelligent people are jerks or bullies. Plenty of people of substantially sub-normal intelligence are veritable saints.

Are you unaware that he considers you to be less than him because of your physical ability or lack thereof? Do you think for a moment that he is so dense as to be unaware of the contempt in which you hold his mental abilities?

Has he ever hit you, or just physically intimidated you? If you are honest with yourself, have you intimidated him intellectually?

You consider yourself, simply, to be better than him. That much is obvious. Maybe you are, but seeing one side of a situation certainly doesn't give any of us the ability to judge.

Have you ever offered him your help, sincerely?

Have you ever asked for his?

What have you done, other than "avoid him", to create a positive relationship with him? How old were the two of you when your parents married? Are you older than him?

Are you capable of putting yourself in his shoes for a moment? Can you understand that it is normal for him to feel threatened by having a sibling who doesn't struggle with school, doesn't make reckless mistakes with automobiles, and probably catches a lot less flack from the parental units?

Why are you cowering in front of him, instead of standing shoulder to shoulder with him?

It doesn't matter how intelligent you are, Omeg, or what line of work you pursue, you are going to work with other human males. That means this will not be your last pissing contest. You had better learn how to fight it out, and then work it out, if you want to have a hope in hell of achieving happiness in this life.

Posts: 11410 | Registered: Jul 2004  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Pete at Home
Member
Member # 429

 - posted      Profile for Pete at Home   Email Pete at Home   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
I have not read the thread closely enough to tell to what extent Jesse's advice applies to this particular situation but I will testify that those are true principles.

Some guys have the same problems over and over with different women. They say "I don't understand women." Lots of guys say this.

Other guys (no less hetero) have the same problems over and over again with different guys. They don't say "I don't understand men" because (no less hetero) men aren't allowed to say that.

I submit that being a man, and understanding other men, are two independent factors.

The sort of problems that you've described with your brother may be the sort that will reoccur with other male co-workers, employers, etc. in your future.

Posts: 44193 | Registered: Jun 2001  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
gruevy
Member
Member # 2985

 - posted      Profile for gruevy   Email gruevy   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Let this be a lesson to you for the next time you plan on bitching about personal matters to an argument forum [Smile]
Posts: 256 | Registered: Aug 2006  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Jesse
Member
Member # 1860

 - posted      Profile for Jesse   Email Jesse   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Who said "slow of mind"?

________________________________________

Now, there's something to mulch on.

Posts: 11410 | Registered: Jul 2004  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Pete at Home
Member
Member # 429

 - posted      Profile for Pete at Home   Email Pete at Home   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Yes, if it was not apparent, I speak from experience.
Posts: 44193 | Registered: Jun 2001  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Jesse
Member
Member # 1860

 - posted      Profile for Jesse   Email Jesse   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Pete?

Did you break your postometer?

Posts: 11410 | Registered: Jul 2004  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Pete at Home
Member
Member # 429

 - posted      Profile for Pete at Home   Email Pete at Home   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
[checks]

[Utter shock]

[Starts a thread]

I think there's a glitch, Jesse.

Posts: 44193 | Registered: Jun 2001  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
canadian
Member
Member # 1809

 - posted      Profile for canadian   Email canadian       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
What pirates!?
Posts: 5362 | Registered: Jun 2004  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Eric
Member
Member # 2699

 - posted      Profile for Eric   Email Eric       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Like they say, you can pick your friends, but you can't pick your relatives.

Oh, and you can pick your friends, you can pick your nose, but you can't wipe your friends on the furniture.

Serenity NOW!

Posts: 448 | Registered: Dec 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
kenmeer livermaile
Member
Member # 2243

 - posted      Profile for kenmeer livermaile   Email kenmeer livermaile       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Can you wipe your frends on your relatives?
Posts: 23297 | Registered: Jan 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
maniacal_engineer
Member
Member # 116

 - posted      Profile for maniacal_engineer     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
was it mark twain who said "the only thing stupider than taking offense when none is meant is taking offense when it IS meant"?
Posts: 962 | Registered: Nov 2000  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
0Megabyte
Member
Member # 1217

 - posted      Profile for 0Megabyte   Email 0Megabyte       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
So, um... I'm back from my vacation!

Whoo... this was, um, fun!

Alright. Now I get to respond. Joy.

Um... lots to respond to.

So: Um... I guess I'll start!

Yes, gruevy, this DOES teach me about pointing out personal feelings on a forum of this sort. Not to say it hasn't been fun, but, crazy stuff.

Hmm. After a couple of weeks having passed, my anger cools and contempt fades away. He can be a jerk, yes. He's physically more formidable looking than me, yes. He can be inconsiderate, arrogant, yes. and I usually have to admit that most of the time it's just... brotherly... spats. With me not exactly perfectly innocent either.

Though not as perfectly biased in one direction as could be assumed. Yes, I do understand that he's different from me, in some ways fundamentally, and that that in and of itself does not make him less than me. And he isn't really less of me.

And now I'm speaking like I will as a politician, trying to mitigate possible negative opinions of me based on something I said due to anger.

Though I know that he treats me no better than his younger brother that he's known much longer than I. Those two got into even worse rows than what Chris and I get into.

We just fight is all, really. And I'm not usually solely on the recieving end, either. I've probably been just as bad to him at times, though not using physical intimidation... as someone said, probably more intellectual intimidation.

I'm imperfect and I know that. If any real harm came to him (not losing his car, but actually getting seriously hurt or something) I'd not be... happy. When his girlfriend left him and he was raelly upset, I wasn't in any way pleased with that. I certainly didn't know what to say to him to make him feel better, so I figured not to really bring it up, but... I wasn't pleased with his plight.

He CAN be a rude little asshole. But he DOES bring out some of the worst in me as well, and if he was here in place of me he'd probably have plenty to say.

However, I vented. Venting was good. Venting even when I am not totally innocent of all fault is still good.

Of course, the only reason I DID use that computer was because a program I was trying to use wouldn't work on my computer and I was trying to get it to work on the other. I was not on long, did not intend to be on very long, and it seemed to not be working by the time I left anyway, so I decided not to continue pushing it and just be done with it. (I probably would have waited maybe... half an hour longer trying to figure it out, tops, had he not come home.)

To respond to bullying:

when I was younger, yes, I was bullied. I was in a private school in which the same group was together the entire time, for eight or ten years or so and I was there the entirety of those years, so... I was pegged early on, and so it never ended. lol

I was never around children much at all before school, always travelling from place to place with parents, and only really having my mom, so of course I didn't really know how to act. I never did really learn how to get along with my peers very well, then, I was pegged early inb that group and they were happy to torment me throughout the entire time, to varying degrees.

Was I to change the fact about myself that people wronging me upset me? I was smart, but not great at social things. Then again, when was I to learn, being stuck with the same small group of children through all my years, around 25 or so, whom I was never friends with?

Fact remains, so what? Because I reacted badly to people being rude to me or did a thousand little indignities or deliberately hid my things (my response at the time, more or less: "That isn't right! That's bad! Why would anyone do such a thing?! Why would people enjoy causing another harm?1:) this made it right because I reacted badly to it?

To not react, to not acknowledge this, has never been in my ability. And I still find it abhorrent. In high school it wasn't really anything. A couple of guys were jerks to me a handful of times, but I learned to deal with it mostly, and it was never realyl serious. After all, it was high school. Whoo. But in general I didn't have much trouble then, once I was away from that one group of kids from before high school. Not that I was popular, cared to be, or had many friends, or cared to have them as friends.

Had I been in another group earlier, like a normal public school, things wouldn;'t have been nearly as bad, if any worse than high school at all. (That is, nothing more than a few rude SOBs that no one liked giving me a little crap a few times, as they did many people. Who does that not happen to?)

What does this have to do with the general statement about bullying? Nothing!

My opinion: Well, it wasn't my fault that other people wanted to cause me harm. If anything is my fault, it's the fact I felt pain.

That can be said of those women who are raped, too, can't it? Certainly it's not nearly that, ahh... bad.

But the idea remains. That some people feel that the act of feeling and showing pain at being harmed is justification for harming that person (or at least, excuses it to any degree [or, that the person who actually feels pain is the one who needs to change])

I cannot accept that it is those who feel pain at being harmed by others that need to change their own selves.

No, it is those that harm others that must be required to change.

Anything else is evil.

Anything less is a detriment to humanity.


Yes. I have some rather... unfond memories of being younger. Perhaps I still find myself a bit pessimistic about human nature due to it. Oh well. I've seen, at least in miniature, the potential within humans for evil. I've also seen the good.

Though perhaps I'm more inclined towards legalism as a philosophy of law than I would be otherwise...

Posts: 2668 | Registered: Sep 2003  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
pickled shuttlecock
Member
Member # 1093

 - posted      Profile for pickled shuttlecock   Email pickled shuttlecock   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
I'm pretty sure it has nothing to do with pain. Also, the idea that only the people doing harm should change is wrong.

The system needs to change.

Here's the deal: humans naturally form into hierarchies. It's built-in. When they're working toward a common goal, and they all have something to contribute, they form into a mostly sane hierarchy which is generally based on abilities and strengths.

However, when we throw a bunch of people into a group without order, without goals, and without concrete ways of measuring success (that they care about), an insane hierarchy emerges. (One has to, you see. It's built-in.) The measure of success becomes how close you are to the top. Therefore, whoever is best at playing the game du jour gets to move up, and of course, the people at the top decide the game - in their favor.

None of the bullying was personal, nor was it about your pain. The people who bullied you were probably very normal people, with nothing really evil about them. (You might say they were selfish, but then, who at that age isn't? Not many.) You were a stepping-stone. Sorry about that, but somebody's got to do it, right? The brain-dead system we throw our kids into requires that some get stepped on. The stepping-stone roles usually get filled by people who refuse to play the game.

I'm also convinced that our brain-dead babysitting system is largely responsible for teenage ennui, angst, and general hopelessness. Apprentice blacksmiths and farmer boys back in the day didn't mope around writing poems about death and about how everything about their lives was fake. Their lives had a point, and they were part of a social structure that existed to fill a need. Today, kids are part of a social structure that exists just to serve itself. When they say that life is fake, they're actually not too far off.

Anyway, I'm sorry you were at the bottom. Welcome to the club of recovering social bottom-feeders. I'm going to hazard a wild guess that we're seriously overrepresented on Ornery.

Posts: 1392 | Registered: Jun 2003  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Ikemook
Member
Member # 1519

 - posted      Profile for Ikemook   Email Ikemook   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
quote:

Other guys (no less hetero) have the same problems over and over again with different guys. They don't say "I don't understand men" because (no less hetero) men aren't allowed to say that.

Thank you, Pete. (I mean that sincerely) It's nice to know I'm not the only one who is completely baffled by my own gender.

And the opposite gender. But that's a different story ^_~

--David

Posts: 415 | Registered: Feb 2004  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
0Megabyte
Member
Member # 1217

 - posted      Profile for 0Megabyte   Email 0Megabyte       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Well, perhaps that theory has a point to it, pickled.

However, I am not certain, as I cannot see precisely what other people are trying to accomplish there. Then again, as you said, I refused to play the game. Thing is, I've been able to even SEE the game, whatever it is. (Again, the top of what? What's to desire about being, what, most popular in a little group of children? How does this affect anything of any significance or worth? I felt this back then as well.)

Now, however, things have changed. I have now been in what you would call sane systems (or at least mostly sane), and due at least some degree to ability on my part, I've done very well, even over short periods of time. (for example: from the first time I stepped into the student newsroom to the point I was editor was... three months? Yes, that was because there was an opening, but I wouldn't have been asked if the EIC didnt feel like I could do it. And I did so, and did so very, very well.)Oh, and I was liked. Ahh, that was fun.

Anyway, being in college for two years now, it seems like what you said has merit. After all, at college the students were generally after... THINGS, and had goals. And then when I joined the groups and DID things, things were even better and I entered into a strangely wide tapestry of people there who were also doing things. There was a kinship there.

Previously, there were no goals. No reason to be there except that it was required.

Hmm. Perhaps that could be a factor in teenage angst.

Oh, Pete, Ikemook, I must admit I find much lacking in my own understanding of other men as well.

Women, too, but only as it relates to me. As it relates to others, I seem to understand pretty well. heh.

Posts: 2668 | Registered: Sep 2003  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Mormegil
Member
Member # 2439

 - posted      Profile for Mormegil         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
quote:
IIRC, about 15 years ago a Wisconsin Judge said something similar about a 5 year old victim of rape. Apparently she'd been raped a few months earlier, different perp, and so the judge dismissed the charges, saying that the victim was "unusually promiscuous."
I hope that's a typo, and a judge didn't really dismiss a 5 year old victim as promiscuous.
Posts: 800 | Registered: May 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
pickled shuttlecock
Member
Member # 1093

 - posted      Profile for pickled shuttlecock   Email pickled shuttlecock   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by 0Megabyte:
(Again, the top of what? What's to desire about being, what, most popular in a little group of children? How does this affect anything of any significance or worth? I felt this back then as well.)

There's the difference, and the reason you refused to play. You saw that it was a useless game. The people who still played intuited it, but never really caught on to the big picture.

Now, whether it was because of intrinsic smarts on your part or because you were driven to that conclusion because you couldn't play the game is another story. [Big Grin] In my case, it's probably both.

Posts: 1392 | Registered: Jun 2003  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
0Megabyte
Member
Member # 1217

 - posted      Profile for 0Megabyte   Email 0Megabyte       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Yes. It is very true that I do not usually greatly value the worth of games that I do not enjoy/understand (such as literary criticism, ala OSC)


It's the same reason I cared naught for high school clubs or political office. It was a useless popularity contest in which nothing was at stake.

In college, however, I and the rest of the student government were dealing with alloting hundreds of thousands of dollars and executing functions that actually had significant effect... or at least were pretty darn cool. THAT was awesome.

Anyway, back to the point, yeah, it was probably a combination of not being able to and seeing it as pointless anyway. Though I DO know that I saw it was pointless back then.

Posts: 2668 | Registered: Sep 2003  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
  This topic comprises 3 pages: 1  2  3   

Quick Reply
Message:

HTML is not enabled.
UBB Code™ is enabled.
UBB Code™ Images not permitted.
Instant Graemlins
   


Post New Topic  Post A Reply Close Topic   Feature Topic   Move Topic   Delete Topic next oldest topic   next newest topic
 - Printer-friendly view of this topic
Hop To:


Contact Us | Ornery.org Front Page

Powered by Infopop Corporation
UBB.classic™ 6.7.1