Ornery.org
  Front Page   |   About Ornery.org   |   World Watch   |   Guest Essays   |   Contact Us

The Ornery American Forum Post New Topic  Post A Reply
my profile login | register | search | faq | forum home

  next oldest topic   next newest topic
» The Ornery American Forum » General Comments » for sharpshin/musket man

 - UBBFriend: Email this page to someone!    
Author Topic: for sharpshin/musket man
kenmeer livermaile
Member
Member # 2243

 - posted      Profile for kenmeer livermaile   Email kenmeer livermaile       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
just plain totally amazing Jeff Beck

It's worth the dialup time, dude.

He's as good as Georges Enescu and Joseph Szigeti.

Better. Except Enescu was also an awesome composer:

Georges Enescu's 3rd Sonata for Violin & Piano, played by himself ?

(Equally worth the download)

Posts: 23297 | Registered: Jan 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Athelstan
Member
Member # 2566

 - posted      Profile for Athelstan   Email Athelstan   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
I wonder if Jeff Beck owes anything to Bert Weedon and his Play in a Day guitar tutor. If only I hadn’t given up after a few hours.

quote:
Among the star guitarists who have acknowledged Bert's help in their early days through his book "Play in a Day" are :
John Lennon, Paul McCartney, Eric Clapton, Mark Knopfler, Brian May, Pete Townshend, Sting, Mike Oldfield, Mike Read, John Miles, Steve Hillage, plus many more. .

Bert Weedon
Posts: 715 | Registered: Aug 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
sharpshin
Member
Member # 3175

 - posted      Profile for sharpshin   Email sharpshin   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Takes a good hour to download even short youtube clips, but I'll check both out, kenmeer.

Just for fun, you might want to check this out, Guy Van Duser playing Jelly Roll Morton's "Wolverime Blues." Nylon string fingerstyle of the highest order. I haven't the patience to have downloaded the whole thing, but then, I don't need to-- I made the guitar he's playing, in 1980, and he's playing it still.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JlI0l0uhlo8

And yes, Jeff Beck owes Bert Weedon.

He also owes Hank Marvin of the Shadows, as does just about every other aspiring Brit rock guitarist of the era.

Another of his main influences was Cliff Gallup, who played for only a year or so with Gene Vincent and the Blue Caps-- so much so that Beck recorded a tribute album, "Crazy Legs" to Gallup, backed by a group called the Big Town Playboys.

Posts: 318 | Registered: Nov 2006  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
kenmeer livermaile
Member
Member # 2243

 - posted      Profile for kenmeer livermaile   Email kenmeer livermaile       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
An hour? Never mind, unless you can do it as you sleep.
Posts: 23297 | Registered: Jan 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
kenmeer livermaile
Member
Member # 2243

 - posted      Profile for kenmeer livermaile   Email kenmeer livermaile       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Wow. This Guy guy is the real thing. The balance and soft bounce in the 'left hand' part (both Guy's in realtime and it's evocation of Jelly's left hand), the smooth ring and subdued brightness of the 'right hand' melody part.

First guy ever made an acoustic, or maybe any guitar, sound like Bix Beiderbecke.

Posts: 23297 | Registered: Jan 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
sharpshin
Member
Member # 3175

 - posted      Profile for sharpshin   Email sharpshin   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
He's the real thing, alright.

There ain't nobody better at this kind of stuff. You should hear his arrangements of Fats Waller-- he made an entire album of stride piano numbers transcribed (by him) for solo guitar.

But Guy's best known piece, which eventually became an albatross for him, is an amazing rendition of Sousa's "Stars and Stripes Forever," complete with drum rolls and piccolo part.

He gave up playing it because it required constant practice and because he got sick of so many requests for it. Chet Atkins covered it, but it took Chet four overdubs in the studio to do what Guy could do in live performance.

Guy always wanted to make a duet album with Atkins.

He once said to Chet, "Chet, you made two albums with Les Paul. You made an album with Earl Klugh. Why won't you make an album with me?"

"Guy," Chet replied, "I didn't get to be Vice President of RCA by being stupid."

Posts: 318 | Registered: Nov 2006  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
kenmeer livermaile
Member
Member # 2243

 - posted      Profile for kenmeer livermaile   Email kenmeer livermaile       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
In CHicago in the 70s, I heard some great blues/rag/swingjazz pianists:

Sunnyland Slim, Erwin Helfer, Little Brother Montgomery.

Erwin was a little short gnome of a Jew who took over from Jimmy Yancey backing Mama Yancey when Jimmy died. (Jimmy is one of Erwin's great heroes.)

Erwin had that some unassuming understated mastery of that form that Guy shows. Done right, it rolls over like a slow grey overcast on a muggy day that suddenly erupts in thunder and cloudburst.

Posts: 23297 | Registered: Jan 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
sharpshin
Member
Member # 3175

 - posted      Profile for sharpshin   Email sharpshin   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
I'm a major afficianado of blues and boogie piano (on which much of my own guitar style is based, though in a completely different way than Guy's)-- my primary heroes are Otis Spann, Professor Longhair, and the incomparable James Booker, but there are lots of others.

I must admit that Erwin Helfer is a new one on me.

Jimmy Yancey was the ultimate blues piano minimalist... I have an old LP with him on one side and Cripple Clarence Lofton on the other. On the Yancey side there is a very long, very slow version of Leroy Carr's "How Long Blues" that sounds like it's played on a toy piano, with a lot of room to breathe in Jimmy's typical understated way, and, of course, complete with his patented dissonant ending. It's the most moving version of this tune I've ever heard.

An interesting contrast to Lofton's romp 'em stomp 'em on the other side of the disc. The only competition for Clarence's "Streamline Train" is Memphis Slim's "El Capitan" (Slim gets to the station first-- in a custom Pullman car, of course).

Vinyl forever!

[ May 10, 2008, 08:58 PM: Message edited by: sharpshin ]

Posts: 318 | Registered: Nov 2006  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
kenmeer livermaile
Member
Member # 2243

 - posted      Profile for kenmeer livermaile   Email kenmeer livermaile       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Erwin was a quiet pillar of the renascent Chicago blues scene of the late 70s. In the following short video one sees Erwin (little guy in fisherman's cap) and one of the great Chess drummers, S.P.Leary, who started stiff, loosened up, smoked, then started falling over his drums by the end of the third set and x whiskeys.

What does S P stand for?

This was, I'm pretty sure, at Elsewhere's on north Lincoln Avenue, around 1978/9. It was like this a lot at closing time.

What a smile SP had! From the YouTube comments:

"This told to me by someone who worked for Luther Allison and I don't remember whose band S.P. was playing with at the time - but they were playing at a campaign rally for Gerald Ford. When S.P was introduced to Ford, he said: "Mr. President, I'm S.P. Leary!" When Ford paused and looked at him blankly, S.P. added "You know, S.P. Leary! the DRUMMER!!"."

He was the drummer you hear, for example, on late 50's Howling Wolf records.

As for Erwin, finally a decent YouTube:

dem Dirty Dozens

This is probably very early 80s. He did the Dirty Dozens with quiet ferocity. If SP'd been there, though, it would have been even more relaxed and harder stomping.

[ May 10, 2008, 10:15 PM: Message edited by: kenmeer livermaile ]

Posts: 23297 | Registered: Jan 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
kenmeer livermaile
Member
Member # 2243

 - posted      Profile for kenmeer livermaile   Email kenmeer livermaile       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
God. I'd forgotten about Lofton. With that thundering left hand and, it seems, some clever pedal technique to let all that sustain happen without jamming the works.

Sunnyland Slim used to split the bill w/ Erwin lots of times. Sunny was like Jerry Lee Lewis as a fullback.

This about 15 years before I heard him. His voice had lost some power but his hands were poignant slabs. If Bach had been a Delta black, he'd have sounded like Sunny.

Posts: 23297 | Registered: Jan 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
kenmeer livermaile
Member
Member # 2243

 - posted      Profile for kenmeer livermaile   Email kenmeer livermaile       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Clarence was one of Erwin's teachers. Imagine a little punk Jewish kid hanging out at Southside dives soaking it up back in the early 50s.
Posts: 23297 | Registered: Jan 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
   

Quick Reply
Message:

HTML is not enabled.
UBB Code™ is enabled.
UBB Code™ Images not permitted.
Instant Graemlins
   


Post New Topic  Post A Reply Close Topic   Feature Topic   Move Topic   Delete Topic next oldest topic   next newest topic
 - Printer-friendly view of this topic
Hop To:


Contact Us | Ornery.org Front Page

Powered by Infopop Corporation
UBB.classic™ 6.7.1