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Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
My fellow Ornerarians,

What do y'all think about having a thread dedicated to miscellaneous chat? A thread were we can post things that we want to discuss, but that don't warrant a thread of their own? Miscellaneous chat, ideas, and things such as recomending a book, movie, poem, or TV show, etc.

That way we won't clog up the board with one liner threads, and we won't end up accidentally hijacking someone else's thread for a single off-the-wall idea or comment.

I started one of these a year or so ago, and it went real well, but if nobody has something to add for period of time, it gets knocked off the page and forgotten.

So, what do y'all think about having this thread pinned to the top of the board?

Perhaps the Mod could call for a vote?

KE

[ February 08, 2005, 05:48 PM: Message edited by: KnightEnder ]
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
I'm not sure if it is considered a blog or internet paper or what, but there is a site called SF Gate with articles written by a guy named Mark Morford that I really enjoy. He writes on all the things we discuss here at OA with a sacrcastic liberal slant. So, all the Lefty's should enjoy it, and if you Righty's want to get your blood going, here's the link. SF Gate If you have trouble finding Mark Morford's stuff on there here is a direct link to his most recent article on Iraq, the election, and BushCo. Come See Our Brutal Democracy And his main site with Archives Mark Morford notes & errata

Also, I just finished the newest book by the guy that writes the "Left Behind" series "Babylon Rising". IMO it was terrible, not nearly as good as the LB series.

KE

[ February 08, 2005, 07:16 PM: Message edited by: KnightEnder ]
 
Posted by Daruma28 (Member # 1388) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by KnightEnder:
He writes on all the things we discuss here at OA with a sacrcastic liberal slant. So, all the Lefty's should enjoy it, and if you Righty's want to get your blood going, here's the link. SF Gate

KE

The left wing version of Ann Coulter? I must find out for myself.... [Wink]
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
Daruma,

Funny, he even singles out Ann Coulter in the article on Iraq, so maybe he feels the affinity. [Smile]

KE
 
Posted by Daruma28 (Member # 1388) on :
 
Ooooh....most definitely.

Morford is the yin to Ann Coulter's yang.

I like it...thanks for the link KE. I can see why guys like you LOL while a right winger would seethe -- the exact same situation with the Left and Ms. Coulter.

I love truly good sarcasm, no matter the ideological slant - which is also why I check out Tom Tomorrow's comic strip everyday - even if I disagree with his POV 99.9999% of the time.

ON the other hand, you got guttersniping idiots like Ted Rall who THINK they are being sarcastically witty...

[ February 08, 2005, 07:19 PM: Message edited by: Daruma28 ]
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
My pleasure Daruma, glad you liked it. I bet KL and some others will as well. There must be something a little perverse in us, I watch Fox News all the time, and I enjoy it.

This is what I hope this thread will allow us to do without bogging down other threads. [Smile]

KE
 
Posted by The Drake (Member # 2128) on :
 
Morford Can't Write. His stuff reads like his fevered brain poured out onto paper. If you've ever seen the movie "Seven" you know what I'm talking about.

From what little I've read of Coulter, she's not much better.

To borrow a phrase from Jon Stewart - They're hurting America.

To borrow a quote from an Adam Sandler movie - We are now all dumber for having listened to it.
 
Posted by Daruma28 (Member # 1388) on :
 
Lighten up Francis. [Wink]

They're hurting America is a bunch of crap. This country was founded in contentious debate, and will be rife with it as long as we are a nation of free political speech. Satirists and sarcastic commentators can at least give us some levity in what is otherwise usually pretty serious discussions.
 
Posted by Everard (Member # 104) on :
 
Yeah, but people like Coulter KILL debate. They make debate impossible, by turning people with opposing opinions into traitors, or worse. Who wants to debate good american policy with a person who's ideas are, by definition, un-american? This sort of attitude DOES stifle debate.
 
Posted by The Drake (Member # 2128) on :
 
My problem with Morford and Coulter isn't that they are partisan, or that they are passionate. It is that they can't write. They can't stick to one topic for an entire essay, speech, or an individual statement in a debate. They believe that affiliation trumps idea, and if you are not with them, then you must be with the other one.

They boil everything down into the crucible of Left and Right. The entire sum of human experience and human future cannot be reduced to a single axis, of evil or otherwise. When they are on the verge of losing a point, they drag out an unrelated topic to hide behind. For example, in the most recent arguments about Iraq, Morford inexplicably drags the EPA into the rant.

It gets us nowhere.
 
Posted by LoverOfJoy (Member # 157) on :
 
quote:
What do y'all think about having a thread dedicated to miscellaneous chat? A thread were we can post things that we want to discuss, but that don't warrant a thread of their own?
I'm game. Although I'm not sure how you decide something doesn't warrant a thread of it's own.

If you saw a movie or read a book recently that you want to comment on, you might not think it really warrants its own thread but it may turn out to be a hot topic. I've seen that happen in the past.

And sometimes it might pull me in. I might not be that interested in a anything goes thread that's all over the place. But if a particular thread's title might intrigue me enough to click and read.

I haven't noticed any problems with smaller issue topics bogging down the forum with too many threads. Has this been a problem?
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
Daruma, Nice Stripes reference. [Smile]

LOJ,

I just think that it would be a good idea to have an open thread in which we can discuss anything no matter how trivial.

And if someone thinks something that comes up here should be a thread they are more than welcome to do so.

There are a lot of times that I want to say something that is trivial or off the topic of the thread.

But even if it is used just to recomend books, rate movies, and such, or simply to say hello to the forum, or inquire about someone's family, or health, job, whatever, I think it would be worthwile. I can think of lots of ways it would help, and can't see how it could possibly hurt.

KE
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
Here's something trivial, from a couple of different threads.

Daruma, "Lighten up Francis" Stripes

KE, "A man's got to know his limitations". Dirty Harry

KL "Mongo just pawn in game of life." Blazing Saddles

Best movie one-liners. Or what is the best one line from a movie ever?
 
Posted by ed (Member # 1673) on :
 
KE: heh...i think that as a rule, quotation citation is an art whereby the speaker marries a quotation to the specific conversation.

e.g.: randomly stating "mongo just pawn in game of life" is good: mel brooks can be a comic genius, if a bit uneven from time to time. however, citing that line immediately following an analogy to chess WRT a general sense of helplessness...well, that's another thing entirely, IMHO. :>

ed
 
Posted by FiredrakeRAGE (Member # 1224) on :
 
...and on that note...

Anyone here read 'Snow Crash'? Great book!

--Firedrake
 
Posted by The Drake (Member # 2128) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by KnightEnder:
Best movie one-liners. Or what is the best one line from a movie ever?

Oh man. So many good lines for every occasion.

"Dyin ain't much of a livin, boy." - Outlaw Josey Wales

"L'Audace, l'audace, toujours l'audace." - Patton

"Get your ass to Mars." - Total Recall

"Tibet is Tibet." - Kundun

"Tell again about the rabbits, George." - Of Mice and Men

Drumroll, please. The greatest quote of all time (saith the Drake):

MATHILDA: Is life always this hard, or just when you're a kid?

LEON: Always like this.
 
Posted by foliated (Member # 2041) on :
 
ok, then, here's a blog for your delectation:
Becker-Posner blog

"Becker" is Gary Becker, Nobel Prize winner in Economics. "Posner" is Richard Posner, Circuit Judge for the U.S. Court of Appeals, Seventh Circuit. Maybe that qualifies them for the "brainy blogger" award, I don't know. [Smile]

But I dare you to say "brainy blogger" ten times fast. [Wink]

I remember the first posts (in december of last year) as giving the clearest arguments I'd seen for going to war in Iraq. They typically take some topic of current interest (this week it's Social Security), each post on it, and then they post again, responding to reader comments.
 
Posted by FIJC (Member # 1092) on :
 
quote:
"Yeah, but people like Coulter KILL debate. They make debate impossible, by turning people with opposing opinions into traitors, or worse. Who wants to debate good american policy with a person who's ideas are, by definition, un-american? This sort of attitude DOES stifle debate."
I feel very strongly that people such as Coulter are not representative of the Conservative movement. There are times that I think that Coulter has a great sense of humor, but most of the time, I don't find her articles or commentary to be of particular interest to me. That, and she is notoriously difficult to work with, so I don't tend to appreciate her works in the movement as much.
 
Posted by potemkyn (Member # 1040) on :
 
http://www.aldaily.com/

Some of the best articles I have ever read on just about every topic imaginable. Not only that, but it has a link to a random philosophy essay (a computer generates a coherent philosophy essay on a randomly picked topic), it's pretty nifty.
 
Posted by kenmeer livermaile (Member # 2243) on :
 
Coulter/Morford: propagandists don't kill debate except in their own arena. Outside of it... well, witness here. Most columnists attempt to manufacture opinion (to borrow Chomsky's expression) not stimulate debate. Witness OSC's World Watch. Yet debate results. EVERYone's a propagandist these days.

quote:
My problem with Morford and Coulter isn't that they are partisan, or that they are passionate. It is that they can't write.
I've never read Coulter but in snatches, but Morford can write. He doesn't write coherent critiques; he writes beat prose as social rant. But on a good day, his metaphors are colorful. However, I haven't read him in a long while. Now he seems to be flaying the same hoarse dead. Time to get out of the game. He's no fun anymore.

("HE'S no fun; he fell right over!")

My impression is that one of Morford's roles during the past 4 years was to be one of the few mainstream (well, quasi-mainstream: SF GATE is an on-line offshoot of the SF Chronicle) columnists who'd regularly and unrestrainedly refer to Bush et al in scathing criminal terms. This alone endeared him to a certain sector of the public.

quote:
Best movie one-liners. Or what is the best one line from a movie ever?
Casablance, Humphrey Bogart, in dialogue with the French constable, who asks him why he came to Casablance in the first place. Humphrey replies:

"For the water. The healing waters."

'But there are none here.'

"I guess I was misinformed."

quote:
Anyone here read 'Snow Crash'? Great book!
Yah! Radioactive cyborg super-dogs and magic-carpet skateboards are the extra topping on my 'za, dewd!

You're on, ed. Mixing movies, characters, and merging game categories:

C3PO: "I suggest a new strategy, R2: let the Wookie win."

R2D2: "@()*^$^()#^%#)(*^@" (translation: "Droid just pawn in game of life.")

I find amusing any implication that the likes of me (and some of us) hew insufficiently close to a given line of topic and thus need a sandbox like this in which to express our lateral tendencies.

A place in which to play Six Degrees of Separation from Condoleezza Rice?

quote:
Some of the best articles I have ever read on just about every topic imaginable.
I love the low-frills/high-fiber frontispiece. A quick schmooze of the blurbs confirms your recommendation.
 
Posted by kenmeer livermaile (Member # 2243) on :
 
quote:
which is also why I check out Tom Tomorrow's comic strip everyday - even if I disagree with his POV 99.9999% of the time.
I used to adore TT, and agreed with much of his POV. But now the extreme satirists of both sides barely titillate me. It seems to me that the 'center of polarity', by which both sides focus their irnoy and aim theit sarcasm, has risen above the fringe ridiculers' mutually respective fields of fire. Their posturings have grown so rote that the mainstream is actually more enetertaining to me.

Viewing this metaphor from another perspective: we see two opposing camps of extreme satirists in effect firing increasingly at each other. The center, formerly in their cross-fire, has risen to a higher level. Ann and Mark are now putting each other out of the business which, just two years ago, largely depended on the fact of the other's existence?
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
While writing on another topic I just realized Paladine was right, no not about anything important, [Wink] but that I am not sure when to use to or too. Sometimes I can tell, but sometimes I can't, does anybody know the rule so I can stop annoying Paladine?

KE
 
Posted by Mike_W (Member # 202) on :
 
Two apples is not too many to eat.

What a language we have!

[ February 10, 2005, 04:41 PM: Message edited by: Mike_W ]
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
Yeah, why are there 3 ways to spell 2(to,too,two), two ways to spell 1(one,won), but only 1 way to spell 3? [Smile]

On another off topic note; I am reading the new book "Pattern Recognition" by William Gibson, and it is about a girl (don't worry this will not ruin the book) who is a member of an online discussion forum much like OA. It's interesting to hear her describe her relationships with these people, most of whom she has never met or talked to/too in real life. It echoes our lives here at OA. So, what are we here, friends? I "talk" to, or think about, many of you more than I talk to or think about my extended family. Whatever we are to/too each other, certainly it is something relatively unique in human history, neh?

KE

PS, OrneryMod, if you/we do decide to anchor this thread feel free to change the title. "Miscellaneous Chat" was the best I could come up with but since then I discussed it with my wife and she says many of the boards she frequents have threads/folders similiar to what I'm suggesting called "Off Topic" folder/thread. So, whatever y'all like best is fine with me.

[ February 10, 2005, 05:14 PM: Message edited by: KnightEnder ]
 
Posted by kenmeer livermaile (Member # 2243) on :
 
quote:
"Pattern Recognition" by William Gibson
An excellent book. I made reference to it here, just yesterday, in (I think) a the thread I started:

Tugging at the Whorenest's Net

"Win’s first line of defense, within himself: to recognize that he was only a part of something larger. Paranoia, he said, was fundamentally egocentric, and every conspiracy theory served in some way to aggrandize the believer."

When you come across the word he uses (in discussing paranoia et al) that sounds like 'aphasia' or 'asthenia' or such, would you please chop'n'paste it and post it here?

GREAT word; can't for the life of me 'member it.

When you've finished it, I think I can tell you wherefrom Gibson got the notion for 'the footage'.
 
Posted by kenmeer livermaile (Member # 2243) on :
 
How about: SIX DEGREES OF SEPARATION FROM OSC ?
 
Posted by kenmeer livermaile (Member # 2243) on :
 
To eat two minis is not too many minis to eat.

Got it? [Wink]
 
Posted by cperry (Member # 1938) on :
 
KE - Funny! Just started reading it last night. Found eerily familiar the similarities b/t her online relationships and those here. Maybe that's why we are so interested in Tezcatlipoca's thread "Poster Profiles." The conversations are sometimes so intense that it makes full sense that we feel connected. It's a community.
 
Posted by witless chum (Member # 1643) on :
 
Just finished the last Dark Tower book by Stephen King. The ending is well .... It makes sense to me, but it half-pisses me off.

Oh, and I wish a certain character had never been introduced into the novels.

Saw a NY Times link to a story about lesbian kisses on TV for sweeps week, which reminded me that the Buffy episode "The Body" is one of the best pieces of TV I've seen.

Dan
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
Apaphina? I'll look.

Another word that was a new one on me was:

steganography: concealing information by spreading it throughout other information.

Think that is really done?

Community? That sounds right. "These are the people in your neighborhood".

KE
 
Posted by Adam Lassek (Member # 1514) on :
 
quote:
Anyone here read 'Snow Crash'? Great book!

Not Stephenson's best, IMO. The Diamond Age was a better SF story, and Cryptonomicon was just plain awesome. Now He's on a bit of a historical fiction tangent with the Baroque Cycle, which I don't mind (although I hesitate to call it a tangent since the Cycle encompasses more pages than all his previous work put together--and all written with a fountain pen no less!).

If you like books like Snow Crash, I just read a great SF novel called Altered Carbon, which is a marriage of cyberpunk and detective novel that I found really engrossing.
 
Posted by FiredrakeRAGE (Member # 1224) on :
 
KnightEnder -

There are stenography programs that allow you to embed information inside things (website headers, jpegs, etc). Basically anything that is compressible data, too. Eerily like 'Shadow of the Hegemon' (only a significantly more intelligent way of doing it). Shortly after 9/11 the NSA made a big deal about stenography as being used by terrorists more than cryptography (because stenography is harder to flag)

--Firedrake
 
Posted by kenmeer livermaile (Member # 2243) on :
 
quote:
concealing information by spreading it throughout other information.

Think that is really done?

For mundane and ubiquitous starters, consider the average TV commercial...

...as for digitally encrypted steganography, why, that sounds like the very definition of the beast. Consider, for example, how packets work. Add an ulterior motive and some encryption, and...
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
Apophenia (page 118) an illusion of meaningfulness, faulty pattern recognition? That's what I think it means. It's not in my dictionary.

That EVP (Electronic Voice Phenomena) that her mom is into sounds like what that movie (with Michael Keaton?) seems to be about.

KE

[ February 10, 2005, 05:49 PM: Message edited by: KnightEnder ]
 
Posted by kenmeer livermaile (Member # 2243) on :
 
quote:
Apophenia (page 118) an illusion of meaningfulness, faulty pattern recognition? That's what I think it means. It's not in my dictionary.

That's IT!!! Thank you! I'd kiss you, but my wife only lets me kiss men who've been transgendered from old girl friends of mine.

She has a sick sense of revenge....
 
Posted by kenmeer livermaile (Member # 2243) on :
 
Apophenia is a theme of Gibson's from way back, even his first novel, which centered on AI. If one thinks about it, apophenia is in a sense a definition of what AI hopefuls wish for their 'come alive & be aware' software/robotics to achieve:

"the experience of seeing patterns or connections in random or meaningless data"

For a machine, anything noy explicitly programmed is random or meaningless, ci?

Later on, apophenia centers deeply in Gibson's IDORU and ALL TOMORROW'S PARTIES (my fave Gibson book).
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
Reading more of that book involving the forum community it occurred to me, as it has several times in the past, what a debt I owe OSC for sponsoring this forum. (I've thanked him in posts and through the OM several times.) That being the case, and knowing my vehement disagreement with his politics, do any of you think OSC would prefer I not be part of his forum?

Before anybody says "no he wouldn't want you to leave, but you should try taking it easier on him or his beliefs", I have to say thanks, but no thanks, my hypocrisy goes only so far.

I've been to other forums and I've never felt as at home as I do here. But, I've never been one to go to parties where I'm not invited, or where I'm unwelcome. This isn't some ploy to get people to beg me to stay. It is an honest concern that I might not be welcome, due to my views/posts, by OSC. Since I know OSC no longer comes here, (a fact that makes it easier to attack some of his positions knowing I am not going to hurt his feelings), and knowing the OM won't ask me to leave unless I break the rules, I ask you, the members of the community, do you think it is wrong for me and others like me to frequent a forum in which I so strongly disagree with its benefactor?

KE

[ February 11, 2005, 03:16 AM: Message edited by: KnightEnder ]
 
Posted by FiredrakeRAGE (Member # 1224) on :
 
KnightEnder -

Yes. It is wrong. Casting out all those who disagree with your point of view is bound to result in great debate. </sarcasm>

Are you fishing, or do you honestly not know the answer?

--Firedrake
 
Posted by OrneryMod (Member # 977) on :
 
KE and all others,

Just to let you know, when I had dinner with Scott back in Nov. of 2003(he was in town for a book signing) he asked if OrneryCon was a bunch of people who agreed with him. I assured him it was not. He was relieved. By the same token, I think he would be disappointed if site was full of parrots. He does value diversity of thought, at least on this site. [Smile]

OrneryMod
 
Posted by cperry (Member # 1938) on :
 
Kenmeer wrote:
Apophenia is a theme of Gibson's from way back, even his first novel, which centered on AI. If one thinks about it, apophenia is in a sense a definition of what AI hopefuls wish for their 'come alive & be aware' software/robotics to achieve:

"the experience of seeing patterns or connections in random or meaningless data"

I haven't read any of Gibson's other works, and I haven't finished Pattern Recognition (so I may be stating the obvious), but this sounds like a definition for many, probably most, humans. Don't most religious folk look for God (or Allah's, etc.) hand in their lives? Don't even some nonreligious folk accept the idea of purpose? Isn't that why we love stories so much? Because they give us patterns in our lives of random data?
 
Posted by OrneryMod (Member # 977) on :
 
I am going to pin this to the top. However, if it goes a week with no posts, it is coming down.

OrneryMod
 
Posted by RickyB (Member # 1464) on :
 
This doesn't come close to Alien Psycho Girl. Sorry. Some of the more deranged stuff i've seen on accidental visits to the democratic underground qualifies, but this is about ten times saner and less foaming at the mouth - which leaves it still plenty venomous [Smile]
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
OM,

About OSC, glad to hear it.

I just finished Pattern Recognition. It was good, but I felt like I needed a dictionary sitting by me the whole time. And I'm not talking about the words that he makes up and you have to derive the meaning from the context.

I've been reading steadily since I was nine years old, have a college education, and at least an average, if not better, vocabulary and I can't remember the last time I encountered so many words I didn't know in one book. So, who is this guy writing for?

It reminds me of the Mash in which Radar uses a thesaraus to write stories for his "learn to be a writer by mail course", or a more recent example, Joey on Friends writing a reference letter for Chandler and Monica's adoption attempt. Isn't it desirable to convey your meaning to your audience, if not as simply as possible, at least with words that the average reader understands? OSC draws beautiful pictures with his words and never makes me feel like I'm lost, or an idiot.

RB,

Is APG Anne Coulter?

KE

[ February 11, 2005, 10:34 AM: Message edited by: KnightEnder ]
 
Posted by kenmeer livermaile (Member # 2243) on :
 
quote:
I haven't read any of Gibson's other works, and I haven't finished Pattern Recognition (so I may be stating the obvious), but this sounds like a definition for many, probably most, humans. Don't most religious folk look for God (or Allah's, etc.) hand in their lives? Don't even some nonreligious folk accept the idea of purpose? Isn't that why we love stories so much? Because they give us patterns in our lives of random data?
Indeed, say I. Regarding religion, my fave quote on its value comes from Paul Park (a more or less sci-fi writer who's often treated religious themes). Roughly paraphrased, he said that 'religion makes use of humanity's vast reservoirs of irrationality'.

Said irrationalty is what allows us to be sentient, yea, even rational, beings. Random association analysis. Run enough nonsense through the hopper and find the patterns within. One's brain is that roomful of monkeys with typewriters accidentally typing out all of Shakespeare's complete works... except that we monkeys attempt to do so with conscious teleology. Borges' famous Library of Babel addresses this both elegantly and exhaustively in only a few pages. (There was only ONE Borges.)

I believe the cosmos is teleological too. Not necessarily sentient. While I like imagining a Mind of God, I see insufficient evidence for such beyond speculation. But our very existence in this corner of the cosmos, planning and striving, is highly teleological. I don't know about y'all but I'm typing on Earth, Teleology Central.

Afterthought: the nice thing about directing one's apophenic tendencies to the Beyond vis a vis Allah et cetera, is that it tends to minimize doing so in mundane physcial matters. (When one intrudes apophenia too much into ratrional affairs, one can do very sad things like run several red lights in a row to prove that 'God is with me' and , as a result, commit vehicular manslaughter, as happened with my best friend who suffers from paranoid schizophrenia with delusions of messianic grandeur. More mundanely, one can conclude that everything is affected by sinister plots by the Clinton Consortium or the Bush Regime.)

But apohenic deism and mysticism WILL intrude on secular matters. Hence my endorsement of a separation of church & state.
 
Posted by simplybiological (Member # 1344) on :
 
KE,
gibson writes for book snobs like me- i recall swooning over his use of unconventional language when i read it (sara read a sci-fi book? yes, she did).

stay far away from everything tom robbins writes if you didn't like pattern rec.

i don't think an author is at all obligated to use exclusively the language that the average reader can understand... you are thinking, perhaps, more about the language as a means of progressing the plot, when the language itself can be vital. i thought that the word choice gibson used was integral in creating the feeling of distance the main character has from other people.

average is really quite dull- wouldn't you rather be challenged than sail through a book that reads like every other book?
 
Posted by kenmeer livermaile (Member # 2243) on :
 
quote:
gibson writes for book snobs like me- i recall swooning over his use of unconventional language when i read it (sara read a sci-fi book? yes, she did).
To me, he's the first 'genre' writer to meet the standard raised by Nabokov in the 50s/60s to writers of English prose. It ws one thing when Updike and the like accepted the challenge and turned their prose into alchemical manifestations of seemingly direct sensory input via verbiage, but when Gibson did so with the inherently surreal landscape available to sci-fi... whew.

quote:
i don't think an author is at all obligated to use exclusively the language that the average reader can understand... you are thinking, perhaps, more about the language as a means of progressing the plot, when the language itself can be vital. i thought that the word choice gibson used was integral in creating the feeling of distance the main character has from other people.

Nabokov forced me to read with a dictionary by my side. I am forever in the debt of this Russian ex-pat who taught English writers a deeper and greater appreciation and command of their native language. The following describes, tangentially, what that feels like:

“As a wordsmith and an artist, Thomas cherished the tools of his trade, lavishing them with respectful care and visiting their stores often. He usually carried a dictionary with him wherever he went. It was a 1941 Webster’s Collegiate Dictionary (Fifth Edition), the largest abridgement of Webster’s New International Dictionary (Second Edition), hardbound in dark vellum the color of dried blood, with a gold embossed colophon and 1,275 pages of text printed on paper so translucently thin as to allow for the illustration of a katydid on page 550 to be viewed simultaneously with the drawing for ‘kangaroo’ on page 549. An image of Krishna playing a flute while standing upon a serpentine wreath of intertwined cobras displayed on page 558 could be seen, visually superimposed, upon a collective illustration of seamen’s knots on page 557. Interroped cobras. The very word – superimposed – was a typical compound verbal instrument, stacking the semanticisms for “place”, “in” and “over” on top of each other in a semantical overlay – or superimposition – of meaning.

“For Thomas, this dictionary was the primal omnibus, the map of the Library of Babel, and a lexical hardware store of inexhaustible exactitude and gradations of meaning which parsed the spectrum of meanings, from violet’s ultra indigo through crimson’s dark stains, with not infinite but surely ample shades of grey.

“He loved the way words functioned as part of a comprehensive mental toolkit. All words were utile enough, but this was especially true of the vocabularies of science, religion and philosophy. Such words, largely derived from Greek and Latin origins, worked like meticulous devices to expand, contract, contain, combine, divide, refine, corrupt, focus, obscure, add to, take away, begin, halt, extend, retract, extract, dissolve, involve, convolve, evolve, devolve, interleave, interweave, intricate, extricate, complicate, simplify, replicate, singularise, multiply, relate, equate, vindicate, negate, fabricate... damn near any thing conceivable or any conceivable thing...

“This particular dictionary had originally been a gift to the Holy Names College in Spokane, Washington from the St. Mary’s Academy in Portland, Oregon, as attested by a handwritten dedication on the inside jacket which passed the gift on to the Convent of the Holy Names of Spokane. Thomas acquired it for twenty-five cents from the booky dustbin of a St. Vincent de Paul thrift store in Union Gap, Washington.

“Inside were a few pressed flowers, possibly older than Thomas, filed in place by their definitions, like examples of spontaneous generation or leftovers from absentminded sorcerers who, attempting to manifest a thing magically, had looked up the precise pronunciation of the object to be incantationally materialized.

“Neither too heavy nor too light, it fit into an old leathern camera case and stayed in John’s knapsack when he was afoot. The supply of metatools it contained was beyond enormous, an array of ideal components in a literal warehouse of imagination. He called it, rightly enough, the Book of Holy Names.

“Especially he enjoyed the way one word construed another – bracing, planing, conjoining, piercing, pivoting, sanding, dressing, shellacing or painting the other – and the way a verbal tool could be modified by another. A chosen prefix, properly attached to a main word’s handle end, affixed itself thereto with a precise semantical click. The addition of a suffix correctly applied to the other end provided the exact extension needed to adjust the meaningful rotation of the now compliant cosmos, to twist and tighten it properly until it aligned with the cant of Thomas’ thought. Properly used, a precise definition held Reality secure in flexible gimbals mounted in symbological bedrock, while he gyred about his sentient self, soaring amid the rising convection of earnest thought, jumping from ship to shore et vice versa via mixed metaphors like the one now spiraling above its compass below...

“ ‘Arcanum exotica'. 'Delirium tremens'. 'Theophany'. 'Ultramundane.’ The joy, the sanity of words on paper, appearing like shadows behind a Japanese screen. One needed a desk. One needed a sense of anonymity from which to read and divine, to fabricate the truth in safety. Thomas spent a lot of time in the library.

“The act of writing was other-worldly. It involved something like perfect faith, an immediate acceptance of and projective belief in one’s imagination. There was, in Thomas’ mind, the sense of a thin but powerful membrane dividing that which he knew he knew from that which he didn’t know he knew, like the surface of a body of water which, viewed from one angle, reflects sky, upturned clouds, a few upside down details but – viewed from another angle, reveals an alluring green world that the swimmer can’t resist and, in a splash, is part of.

“Writing was like that. Thomas could hover a long time at the page’s edge, awkward and unsure, then immerse and be in another world. Overworking a metaphor was like holding one’s breath too long; the need to surface became overpowering and, in a gasp, it was over.

“The world was again thick and impenetrable, the library heavy and still, aglare with the oppressive weight of overhead fluorescent lighting. Sequestering his books and notes packwise, Thomas left the building for the comforting chill of fog, winter and hunger.”

 
Posted by simplybiological (Member # 1344) on :
 
In Nabokov's memoirs he writes a lot about entomology, one of my favorites (about spreading a butterfly):
"[T]he satisfying crackle produced by the pin penetrating the hard crust of its thorax; the careful insertion of the point of the pin in the
cork-bottomed groove of the spreading board; the symmetrical adjustment of the thick, strong-veined wings under the neatly affixed strips of semitransparent paper."
The word "satisfying" makes the excerpt.

[ February 11, 2005, 01:44 PM: Message edited by: simplybiological ]
 
Posted by kenmeer livermaile (Member # 2243) on :
 
Nabokov and Borges came into American mainstream vogue about the same time: late 50s/early 60s.The former was verbose, writing 'long-chain polymer' sentences, the latter, laconic; although Borges often wrote labyrinthine sentences in his early years, his stories rarely exceeded 10 pages and often limited themselves to 3 or 4.

Borges' icon of self is the image of an aged blind librarian (which indeed he was) wandering among books he remembered but could no longer read. Nabokov's lingering image is of the lepidopterist, a novelist with net in hand pursuing the rare verbal flutter in swamps, deserts, shopping malls...

[ February 11, 2005, 02:29 PM: Message edited by: kenmeer livermaile ]
 
Posted by kenmeer livermaile (Member # 2243) on :
 
KE:

Here's your list man:

Talking Points

Dig the archives with a search function, pinpoint it to a given bit of breaking news (he's fairly real time), and you'll find an amazingly exhaustive Concordance of Bushllit.
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
Thanks KL. I'm walking out the door but I look forward to seeing it.

KE
 
Posted by FiredrakeRAGE (Member # 1224) on :
 
With regard to Gibson's language use -

Snow Crash is a good example of a book that does this right. There is vocabulary that is not in the 'average' vocabulary. However that vocabulary is used in such a manner that the flow of the story is uninterrupted.

In Pattern Recognition, Gibson seems to have no such goal. The story is corrupted by the need to intersperse it with esoteric vocabulary.

--Firedrake
 
Posted by kenmeer livermaile (Member # 2243) on :
 
The Talking Points was recommended to me by, in fact, William Gibson, who said of it:

[B[ It never ceases to amaze me, how Josh Marshall can keep this administration's lies sorted, handily enough to cite and refute them, crisply and authoritatively, day after day. This must amount by now to knowing two entirely different versions of history off by heart, the one genuine, the other an endlessly (and indeed artlessly) exfoliating "tissue of sheerest horse*****"

Here, today, he does it again, skewering the sort of shameless (not to say surreal, grotesque) revisionism that no long even causes our jaws to drop. Myself, were I to daily and directly subject myself to the full blast of ill-crafted lies issuing from the White House, I would quickly grow punchdrunk and confused. I simply wouldn't have the stomach for it. Not so Josh Marshall. Long may he wave.

*Wm. S. Burroughs, 1914-1997 [/B]
 
Posted by kenmeer livermaile (Member # 2243) on :
 
quote:
In Pattern Recognition, Gibson seems to have no such goal. The story is corrupted by the need to intersperse it with esoteric vocabulary.

I understand your point, but my preference leads the other way. I enjoy Gibson's verbal fetishes. His prose is 'real' to me. (What does THAT mean?) It has an inevitability to it. I can almost feel the topographical relief of his sentences. Even when, as in Pattern Recognition, Gibson's palette feels muted, almost B & W, it still has this sense, to me, of being 'real' somewhere else. Not the story or the charcters -- those I judge by an entirely different measure of writer's craft -- but as verbal artifacts.

Stephenson writes wonderful prose, and spins an amazing yarn -- he's a better yarnsmith than Gibson, which I suspect is something with which Gibson would agree -- but there are paragraphs, even pages, where I just see words, arrayed much better than the average writer's, but just words nonetheless.

It's almost like that phenomenon Gibson mentions in the book: voices coming from recorded material played backwards or slowed down or what have you.

His prose FEELS like one of those precise Swiss watches of which, I understand, he is very fond. Chronometer fetish. I think that what I sense is the ABSENCE of so much effluvia, the shadows of countless words edited out by what I assume is a VERY painstaking method. He's quite the verbal economist, and yet he bever feels clipped or pinched to me, except thiose passages where a sense of pinched clipping is what he wishes to evoke.

It takes all kinds. WHile I thought Snowcrash was an AMAZING book, I'll probably never read another Stephenson book. But i'LL READ EVERYTHING BY gIBSON. fUNNY, HUH?
 
Posted by kenmeer livermaile (Member # 2243) on :
 
Since we've mentioned odd physchic syndromes:

Weird Brain States

"Damage to the front of the temporal lobe and the amygdala just below it can result in the strange condition called Kluver-Bucy Syndrome. Classically, the person will try to put anything to hand into their mouths and typically attempt to have sexual intercourse with it. A classic example is of the unfortunate chap arrested whilst attempting to have sex with the pavement"
 
Posted by kenmeer livermaile (Member # 2243) on :
 
"but there are paragraphs, even pages, where I just see words, arrayed much better than the average writer's, but just words nonetheless."

Clarification: this refers to Snowcrash.
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
KL,

Thanks, just had a chance to check it out. Unfortunately, searching the archives is going to take a bit of work. I was hoping for more of a list. I think what I'll do, as my new hobby when I'm not playing poker, is make the list and cross-reference it with the pertinent facts. Hopefully I'll have it finished before Bush runs for his third term. [Frown]

My boy told me a joke today based on the "give a man a fish, feed him for a day, teach him too fish, feed him for a lifetme." It goes; "start a fire for a man, keep him warm for a day, set him on fire, keep him warm for the rest of his life." Kids. [Razz]

An old riddle, perhaps, I hope, out of date.

A man and his son are riding in a car when they have a terrible accident. The man is killed and the son is taken to the emergency room for surgery. The surgeon comes in and says; "I can't work on this boy, he's my son." How can that be? [Confused]


It ocurred to me the other day that the term "Indian Giver" is not a slander on indians (native Americans, whatever), but on us. Because we are the one's that gave the Indians things, then took them back. [Smile]

See, without this new MC posting thread you all would be deprived of all that. [Wink]

KE

[ February 12, 2005, 08:19 PM: Message edited by: KnightEnder ]
 
Posted by msquared (Member # 113) on :
 
The doctor is his mother.

How about this one.

A house has 4 southern exposures. A bear is running towards the house. What color is the bear?

msquared
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
m2 excellent and correct.

I first heard that on an episode of "All in the Family" a couple of decades ago. That's why I said I hope it is out of date. For example, my oldest son 15 got it right away, but my mom and stepfather never did. So maybe we have become less sexist?

Maybe you should put **Spoiler** or **Answer to Riddle** at the top of your post? I'm still thinking about yours and if anybody figures m2's out please put spoiler or Answer to Bear Riddle before the answer.

Edited to add:

**Answer to Bear Riddle** ________________________________________________________________________White.



KE

[ February 12, 2005, 09:27 PM: Message edited by: KnightEnder ]
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
Did bloggers exist when OSC wrote Ender's Game? I didn't know about them at the time, and if they didn't, I am amazed at OSC's ability to see into the future. Demeosthenes and Locke, I mean.

KE

[ February 12, 2005, 10:29 PM: Message edited by: KnightEnder ]
 
Posted by kenmeer livermaile (Member # 2243) on :
 
quote:
Did bloggers exist when OSC wrote Ender's Game? I didn't know about them at the time, and if they didn't, I am amazed at OSC's ability to see into the future. Demeosthenes and Locke, I mean.
No, they didn't. Not unless you count a few researchers posting findings on college computers 'bloggers'. Bulletin boards were already in progress, as I recall, but were usually limited to a local campus's network.

But... Ender's Game was first published in 1985. William Gibson's Neuromancer was published in 1983. This book (and some previous short stories by Gibson), first introduced the term and concept of cyberspace to Westerners.

So the concept of digital fora was probably already established in the sci-fi genre. Nonetheless, Card's extrapolation of how fora could produce a new aristocracy of ideas seems to me very prescient, something that has yet to be fully realized but the germ of which can be seen on the web and in fora like Ornery.

Card seems to have a talent for condensing conjectures into raw essence, encysted in forms small enough to withstand projection into the future without losing the features that allow us to recognize it here and now. Perhaps this is related to his knack for writing extremely condensed prose that paints images not by providing background but, instead, bu sticking to a very few telling details and requiring one's imagination to fill in the rest.

It's not my preferred style but it works EXTREMELY well (in Ender's Game, at least) and makes Card, for me, THE heir apparent to Old Man Heinlein's corner of the genre.

It seems to me that Card took ancient Grek and Roman Senate patterns and extrapolated them into the idea of a world wifde digital communication network. Part of what makes it seem so prescient is that he restrained his version of Cyberia to typed text, which matches mainstream net usage now (bit probably not 20 years from now, when print types ('scuse pun, please) like us will be very old hats.

I think he did this out of his own textual bias and an understanding that the power of text, which can be edited, read and reread over and over, and examined in minutiae, will still be the preferred communicational province of intellectual movers and shapers of the future (which, in 1985, the year 2005 very much was).

Card in Ender's Game seems politically very savvy. I can't help but feel that his columns are written with an ulterior motive. Not insioncerely, per se, but more than meets the eye.
 
Posted by kenmeer livermaile (Member # 2243) on :
 
quote:
Thanks, just had a chance to check it out. Unfortunately, searching the archives is going to take a bit of work. I was hoping for more of a list. I think what I'll do, as my new hobby when I'm not playing poker, is make the list and cross-reference it with the pertinent facts. Hopefully I'll have it finished before Bush runs for his third term
Googol 'list of bush lies' and such and you'll get lots of them animals. Most of them will be crude, almost as if they were designed by Bush campaign headquarters to be easily shot down on technicalities. ('This wasn't REALLY a lie; et cetera.')

Thewy would, however, provide excellent resource quotes for googoling the background skinny on them, which might be a faster way of getting to the roots.

But for when you want only the best and exhaustive details, the Talking Points guy will prove a great freind. The problem is he's TOO good. He's on top of a policy squawk from the first bleat. By the time it's mainstreamed, he may have moved on to something else, only referencing back ton the issue as further rumbles of absurdity echo back like a T-storm receding into the eastern hor

So perhaps the best way to use him is to googol an event first and trace the time stamp back to the start. That's probably where you'll find him all over the thing, and where you'll find some deep giblets in the gravy.izon...
 
Posted by kenmeer livermaile (Member # 2243) on :
 
!!!!****SPOILER****!!!!

quote:
A house has 4 southern exposures. A bear is running towards the house. What color is the bear?
White. Polar bear. Only a house on the North Pole would have 4 southern exposures. (Actually, it would have one circumferential southern exposure, but that would confuse the riddle.)

At the North Pole, there are only 2 directions? North (anything above the horizon) and South (anything on land). East and West would exist only as geographical names of convenience, like East and West hemispheres, and as fore and aft lines of the sun's direction of motion across the sky?

"The irony is that you have to go in to get out."

[ February 13, 2005, 12:45 AM: Message edited by: kenmeer livermaile ]
 
Posted by cperry (Member # 1938) on :
 
KE - I think, also, that you have to be in the mood for a book that makes you work for it. Some books are fluff. What's fluff for me is hard work for my daughter. Etc. But sometimes I need fluff and other times I need to earn a good story. The feeling of reward makes it worth the effort!

That said, I heard OSC speak at our state English teacher's conference last October, and he applauded writers such as Asimov for telling a story cleanly.

I wonder if there aren't more ways to value literature. Plot, certainly, is one quality, but Grisham and Clancy have mastered plot, and I don't think of them as writers of classics. King, in my opinion, has mastered characterization, but I'm not sure where he's going to end up in terms of passing the test of time. In the end, it's writers who give us a good plot, believable characters, and quality literature (I think of it as poetry posing as prose) who last. Genre writers have a tougher chore because their stories eventually become dated by default, but if the characters, theme, and style are good enough, readers 200 years from now will probably forgive them (think Brave New World or Frankenstein).
 
Posted by cperry (Member # 1938) on :
 
KE - I found this and thought you might like it:

"Teleology is a defining characteristic of intellectual disciplines that are recognized as unscientific or should be, like religion, astrology, evolutionary psychology, and retirement planning." http://www.homestead.com/flowstate/Dteleology.html

You wrote: "But apohenic deism and mysticism WILL intrude on secular matters."

I like to think I apply my tendency to this only after the fact rather than a test of it. Is that more or less rational? (Certainly safer than running red lights!)
 
Posted by cperry (Member # 1938) on :
 
Do you know this one?

Metaphors

I'm a riddle in nine syllables.
An elephant, a ponderous house,
A melon strolling on two tendrils.
O red fruit, ivory, fine timbers!
This loaf's big with its yeasty rising.
Money's new-minted in this fat purse.
I'm a means, a stage, a cow in calf.
I've eaten a bag of green apples,
Boarded the train there's no getting off.
~Sylvia Plath
 
Posted by kenmeer livermaile (Member # 2243) on :
 
quote:

"Teleology is a defining characteristic of intellectual disciplines that are recognized as unscientific or should be, like religion, astrology, evolutionary psychology, and retirement planning."

Cute quip about retirement. I find that self-avowed 'rationalists' have an irrational fear of or bias against teleological notions. Just like no one knows the how of primogenesis, no one knows the why -- or not -- of whatever purpose the cosmos might have.

quote:
I like to think I apply my tendency to this only after the fact rather than a test of it. Is that more or less rational? (Certainly safer than running red lights!)
Seems to me that what evolution claims to have happened is de facto teleology. Guys like Stephen Jay Gould bent themselves inside out arguing against this, stating that the accidents of nature, while wondrous and remarkable, were only accidents and nothing else.

This misses the point that, accidents or not, they DO tend to march in a steady direction. Purpose is as purpose does (empirical results ) just as much as purpose is as purpose plans or ponders (sentience or teleological hard-wiring of natural laws).

I like to say that the reason we're here is to wonder why we're here. Think of it as job security?
 
Posted by kenmeer livermaile (Member # 2243) on :
 
quote:
A melon strolling on two tendrils.
O red fruit, ivory, fine timbers!
This loaf's big with its yeasty rising.
Money's new-minted in this fat purse.

Fantastic poetry, but too complex to be an effective riddle. 9 syllables? Oh well, it's worth it for the War of the World's cantaloupe...
 
Posted by kenmeer livermaile (Member # 2243) on :
 
quote:
Genre writers have a tougher chore because their stories eventually become dated by default, but if the characters, theme, and style are good enough, readers 200 years from now will probably forgive them (think Brave New World or Frankenstein).
Gibson's "Pattern Recognition" is unique. It is not science-fiction nor is it an attempt to 'tyranscend the genre' ('tyranscend': neat typo) nor an attempt to be accepted as a mainstream author. Gibson has often and wryly commented on the increasing difficulty of describing a future dystopia that was distinguishable from modern reality without resorting to sci-fi parlor tricks and self-conscious 'Heinleiners' ('the door dilated').

When Michael Jackson married Lisa Marie Presley, he mourned with a chuckle, "My job has gotten that much harder."

And so, in "Pattern Recognition", the lens is inverted. We do not read of an hypothetical future world attempted to be rendered 'realistically', we read of an hypothetical contemporary world attempted to be rendered with fidelity sufficient to the surreality it inspires.

The future, in Gibson's case, IS what it used to be. Comparison: Voltaire used sci-fi conceits in much of his fiction: Micromegas, for example. But it is Candide, with its insertion of real happenings of that crazy time, that is most satisfyingly fantastic and realistic at the same time. Compare Candide to Gulliver's Travels. GT was meant as political satire but that is lost to us now and becomes strictly a fantasy tale with some lingering effectiveness in its more obvious metaphors. Candide speaks even more clearly today of the questions it asked and protests it made, yet seems even MORE surreal in its unwincing reality than Swift's Lilliputions...
 
Posted by kenmeer livermaile (Member # 2243) on :
 
A bit of rhyme from me friend Doctor Popeye:

Quantum Man

You see me as "phenomenon,"
So says the Doktor Kant-ly;
I fancy me as "noumenon,"
If somewhat nonchalantly.
Perceptions false and true entwined
About the self provide
A coy facade of masks behind
Which each of us can hide.
I shimmer thus, a quantum soul,
In every place and none
You cannot know my nature whole
Which makes life much more fun.
 
Posted by kiddo (Member # 1884) on :
 
Happy Valentines Day MW
[Wink]
 
Posted by cperry (Member # 1938) on :
 
9 syllables per line...
 
Posted by kenmeer livermaile (Member # 2243) on :
 
quote:
9 syllables per line...
I was afraid of that. I wouldn't know a dactylic hexameter from a chili dog with onions...
 
Posted by cperry (Member # 1938) on :
 
Well, I could not determine, in my attempts to scan this poem, a defined metrical pattern, beyond the limit of 9 syllables per line.

But that's the only hint I'm giving!
 
Posted by foliated (Member # 2041) on :
 
hm. since we're trading puzzles, here's one i like. maybe some of you know this one, but here it is:

you have a cup of coffee, and a cup of cream next to each other on a table. I take a teaspoon of cream and put it in the coffee. Then I take a teaspoon of the (inhomogeneous!) coffee-cream mixture, and put it in the cup of cream.

So, is there now more cream in the coffee, or more coffee in the cream?

apropos of nothing, really, but suggested by this question to make a "quote of the day":

"I like my sugar with coffee and cream!"
-Beastie Boys
 
Posted by kenmeer livermaile (Member # 2243) on :
 
quote:
Well, I could not determine, in my attempts to scan this poem, a defined metrical pattern, beyond the limit of 9 syllables per line.

But that's the only hint I'm giving!

That's quite the tongue-in-cheek bulge. Purloined letter technique wins AGAIN.

But I;ve no idea what the term for a nine syllable verse meter might be. A platypus nineamus?
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
More cream in the coffee. [Confused]

On another thread I said "Nobody say nothing", then some very clever person registered under the name Nobody and posted the single word "nothing", then unregistered. So, who was Nobody? I'm sure you won't get in any trouble, and it was very funny. [Big Grin] (My money is on m2)

I'm sorry you unregistered, my next post was going to be;

"Who knows the trouble I've seen?

Who knows my sorrow?" [Frown]


*Another riddle, a tough one this time. Of course not too tough for the geniuses here at OA.

Three men walk into a hotel and ask for a room. The desk clerk says fine that'll be $30 dollars and gives them a key. After the men have gone up to their room the manager comes in and asks the clerk how much he charged them for the single room. The clerk says $30 dollars. The manager says; "no, that room is on special this week and is only $25 dollars." He then gives the clerk five $1 dollar bills and tells him to go give the three guys there money back.

On the way up the clerk decides that the three guys can't split five dollars evenly, so he pockets two of the $1 dollar bills and gives the men the remaining three $1 dollar bills.

So, each man gets $1 dollar bill back, which means each man has paid $9 dollars. $9 dollars times the 3 men is $27 dollars. So, they've paid $27 dollars total. Plus the two $1 dollar bills in the clerks pocket, the $28th & $29th dollars.

What happened to the thirtieth dollar bill?

(The room had three beds and these guys were just friends. Don't want anyone refusing to attempt to answer the riddle on moral grounds.) [Wink]

KE

[ February 14, 2005, 07:10 PM: Message edited by: KnightEnder ]
 
Posted by cperry (Member # 1938) on :
 
"platypus nineamus"

Oh yeah! Better than dactylic hexameter.

What happened to the thirtieth dollar bill?
It got its own room?

Here's another clue (I lied): Ignore the first line. The others give it away. Really.
 
Posted by cperry (Member # 1938) on :
 
Kenmeer wrote:
"Card in Ender's Game seems politically very savvy. I can't help but feel that his columns are written with an ulterior motive. Not insioncerely, per se, but more than meets the eye."

Care to venture a guess as to what that motive might be?
 
Posted by kenmeer livermaile (Member # 2243) on :
 
quote:
Care to venture a guess as to what that motive might be?
Well, I would look at those concepts he expounds most vociferously with the least logical substantiation. Then I would consider that by so doing, he emulates a certain brand of rhetoric (often associated with the Right but not always) in a way unflattering to it when read by inquisitive Ornery types. This DOESN'T necessarily mean he's trying to demean certain reight-wing positions by advocating them intensely but poorly. I'm saying that by so doing, he causes the issues to be fiercely debated. He emboldens the Right by expounding many of their ideas; he emboldens the Lleft by expounding them so poorly.
 
Posted by Storm Saxon (Member # 1070) on :
 
Really fascinating reading which has caused me to re-evaluate my stance against the death penalty.

Who'll stop the reign?

quote:

Gregory Jessner shares roughly the same lifetime with the Aryan Brotherhood. He was 3 years old when they were founded in 1964 by Irish bikers in the exercise yard at San Quentin Maximum Security Prison, just 15 miles north of where he grew up. As a boy, he played with the children of Faye Stender, the radical defense attorney who was later paralyzed in an assassination attempt traced to the Black Guerrilla Family, another prison gang against whom, according to legend, the Aryan Brotherhood was formed to fight. Now, Jessner is preparing to face off against what is perhaps the most murderous and feared criminal gang in the country.



[ February 15, 2005, 02:42 AM: Message edited by: Storm Saxon ]
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
What makes him think they won't come after him? They have nothing to lose, and that would send a serious message to the other "thousands" of federal prosecutors.

KE
 
Posted by foliated (Member # 2041) on :
 
KE wrote:

quote:
More cream in the coffee. [Confused]

nope. [Smile]
 
Posted by Storm Saxon (Member # 1070) on :
 
KE,

Yep.
 
Posted by foliated (Member # 2041) on :
 
oh, and here's my guess for your problem, KE:

The thirtieth dollar went to one of the three gentlemen, who, though they are named Bert, Ernie, and Tinky-Winky, are nevertheless just friends. [Big Grin]

As did the 27th and 26th. The 28th and 29th (to stick to the numbering you suggested) stayed with the clerk. Put another way, the three men paid 27 dollars, two of which ended up in the clerk's pocket. So if you like, those aren't the 28th and 29th bills in the clerk's pocket. They are the 26th and 27th.

as for my problem, what I am asking is this. After you do the procedure I described, is there more coffee in the cup that originally had only cream, or is there more cream in the cup that originally had only coffee?
 
Posted by foliated (Member # 2041) on :
 
okay. even more precise, and maybe less readable because of that:

which is greater: the amount of coffee in the cup that originally had only cream, or the amount of cream in the cup that originally had only coffee?
 
Posted by kenmeer livermaile (Member # 2243) on :
 
quote:
which is greater: the amount of coffee in the cup that originally had only cream, or the amount of cream in the cup that originally had only coffee?
Did each cup have equal volumes of their respectives at the start?
 
Posted by foliated (Member # 2041) on :
 
kenmeer wrote:

quote:
Did each cup have equal volumes of their respectives at the start?
this is an interesting question. You'll be able to answer it if you get the problem. but here's the original question, together with clarifications. The third is the most important one, I think.

quote:
you have a cup of coffee, and a cup of cream next to each other on a table. I take a teaspoon of cream and put it in the coffee. Then I take a teaspoon of the (inhomogeneous!) coffee-cream mixture, and put it in the cup of cream.

So, is there now more cream in the coffee, or more coffee in the cream?

1. since I say that you have "a cup of coffee" and "a cup of cream" you can assume both that a) there are two cups in front of you, and b) they each contain the amount of liquid equal to what a cook would call a "cup". So the volume of liquid in each cup is the same.

2. What I'm asking is this. After you do the procedure described above, which is greater: the amount of coffee in the cup that originally contained only cream, or the amount of cream in the cup that originally contained only coffee?

3. (this is actually essential and I forgot this part, sorry) you use the same spoon for both operations.

4. In each transfer of liquid, I move the same amount of liquid, whether it's cream in the first transfer, or the mixture in the second transfer. Namely, I move one teaspoon of liquid each time.
 
Posted by Mariner (Member # 1618) on :
 
foliated's riddle is actually quite simple. Since one teaspoon is added to and one teaspoon subtracted from each cup, each cup has the same volume that it started with. Thus, the amount of cream lost in the cream cup is countered by the exact same amount of coffee that is now in the cream cup. Therefore, there is the same amount of cream in the coffee as there is coffee in the cream.

Of course, my answer assumes that coffee and cream form an ideal solution, ie, the partial molar volumes of cream and coffee in solution are the same as their molar volumes as pure components. But I'm sure foliated didn't expect thermodynamics to come into this.
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
Foliated,

Correct.

But wouldn't the Coffee Cream mixture mean that you are putting less than a full teaspoon of coffee back into the cream?

KE
 
Posted by kenmeer livermaile (Member # 2243) on :
 
quote:
But wouldn't the Coffee Cream mixture mean that you are putting less than a full teaspoon of coffee back into the cream?
He said that it would be nonhomogenous. I other words, the coffee and cream would remain magically separate even when placed in the same cup.
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
Ahh, using trick words. I see how we're gonna play, now. [Wink]

KE

[ February 15, 2005, 08:57 PM: Message edited by: KnightEnder ]
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
Anybody know what the status is on the outing of that CIA agent by Rove and that traitor Tom Novak?

KE
 
Posted by kenmeer livermaile (Member # 2243) on :
 
quote:
Anybody know what the status is on the outing of that CIA agent by Rove and that traitor Tom Novak?
Some folks say there weren't any scandals in this administration. From where I stand, there've been so many I done give up tracking them.
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
Anybody read that story on the Aryan Brotherhood that Storm Saxon linked on page 2? Good article, it would make a good book. I don't agree with their actions, but I can understand how they feel. A couple of months ago I was taken to Galveston County jail due to my wife having forged my signature to a check that bounced. Better me than her.

Anyway, I was in a cell with one other white guy and about fifteen black guys, also three guys straight from Mexico but they didn't speak english and were passed out drunk most of the time. One of the black guys threatened me and we got face to face in the cell before he decided he didn't want to fight. Now I've argued against racism many times on this board, but I can't help feeling that if we had of fought, the other black guys in the cell would have been on his side. They all seemed to form an immediate bond and I was definitely the outsider. So, I can see why, being outnumbered 10 to 1, they would do what they had to do to survive in prison.

KE
 
Posted by Storm Saxon (Member # 1070) on :
 
I should have probably given it it's own thread, because it's something that has a lot of aspects to it, but since I've already made one on the other side, and I'm not that egotistical that I think my stuff has to be read by the whole world, I guess I'll just leave it in here to be read and commented on by any who are interested.
 
Posted by foliated (Member # 2041) on :
 
Mariner's solution (in the first paragraph) is basically correct, though the amount of liquid in each cup at the beginning and end is actually irrelevant. The answer will still be "the same", as long as you transfer the same amount in each step.Even if I started out with a coffee pot full of coffee, and a cupful of cream. That answers kenmeer's question.

to answer KE's question more fully: yes, it's true that typically there might be less coffee in the second teaspoonful. But any coffee in the second spoonful is exactly balanced by the cream left in the cup of mostly coffee. (which is basically what Mariner said)

kenmeer: my use of the word "inhomogeneous" was meant in the sense of "not uniform". ie I didn't stir the coffee after putting the cream in it. Thus in principle, it would be possible to put the first spoonful of cream in the coffee, and then take a second spoonful that completely misses the cream in the coffee, so that the second spoonful has only coffee in it. (thinking about this situation might make the answer clearer).

As for the assumptions: Usually in these kinds of problems one is meant to make assumptions so as to get to the important (and maybe somewhat pretty, too) kernel of reasoning. Thus one has ideal solutions, ideal fluids, frictionless surfaces (actually I put in comment #3 for this reason), "all metals are superconductors", zero air resistance, "all functions are analytic", "all series converge", spherical cows...

but more to the point, I remembered this one from reading an interview with a famous Russian mathematician. I remember he called it the sort of problem traditionally given in Russia to little kids to play with "before their minds have been polluted by school mathematics." or some phrase like that. So I'm pretty sure that he meant to keep complications out of it.

Let me see if I can find the interview.
 
Posted by WarrsawPact (Member # 1275) on :
 
Oh man, I was thinking whipped cream. Starbucks hath polluted my brain.

See, I was thinking, "Well the cream's going to rise to the top when you put it in the coffee. So when you pull your spoon out of the mix it's highly likely you'll end up with a higher volume of (whipped) cream than coffee."

Oh well.
 
Posted by FiredrakeRAGE (Member # 1224) on :
 
foliated said:
quote:
but more to the point, I remembered this one from reading an interview with a famous Russian mathematician. I remember he called it the sort of problem traditionally given in Russia to little kids to play with "before their minds have been polluted by school mathematics." or some phrase like that. So I'm pretty sure that he meant to keep complications out of it.
I think it has more to do with life experience than 'school mathematics'. When I think of a cup, I think of a coffee cup - relatively small compared to a spoon. With that in mind, it would be impossible to add the cream to the cofee without distributing it throughout the cup (in different densities).

However, if the cup is large enough so that it is possible for the cream to be added without causing issue with the far reaches of the coffee it would change the answer to the problem.

If you don't specifically think of 'coffee' as the stuff you drink out of a coffee cup every day the problem changes. So it's not 'school mathematics' that makes the problem change, but 'experience in dealing with coffee' (of course non-starbucks coffee)

--Firedrake
 
Posted by FiredrakeRAGE (Member # 1224) on :
 
I just finished 'Pattern Recognition'. It was good, and the prose became significantly more fluid towards the middle/end of the book.

It was a good book, but not a great book. I found it significantly less enjoyable than most of Gibson's other work.

--Firedrake
 
Posted by cperry (Member # 1938) on :
 
Really? So which of his books would you recommend someone read first?
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
Yes, PR got a lot easier to read once you got through the first of it. And what is wrong with Starbucks coffee? Stacy's just been made Assistant Manager, and they've been pretty good to us when we've needed it. Especially when Stacy just took the job as a part-time thing, and because she was spending so much drinking coffee there anyway.

KE
 
Posted by FiredrakeRAGE (Member # 1224) on :
 
cperry -

There's only ever one answer to that. Neuromancer, of course [Smile]

...and I'd recommend Cryptonomicon by Stephenson as well...

--Firedrake
 
Posted by kenmeer livermaile (Member # 2243) on :
 
quote:
There's only ever one answer to that. Neuromancer, of course
Aye. 22 years old and it has aged very well indeed. I think one would have to go back to Bester's "The Stars My Destination" to find a stylistic ground-breaker so powerful and colorful that also holds up to passe-ing age.
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
Looks like KL, SS, and possibly RickyB and kelcimer are up and posting at this late hour. 1 am here in Texas. I have AOL and you can invite people to chat if they have AIM, which is free. If anybody wants it so they can chat every now and then let me know and I will send it to you. Or you might be able to get it free online, either way. I think I am either KnightEnder or Endersshdw on AIM. It's been a while I'll have to check. I am definitely KnightEnder on AOL, and here of course. [Smile] Are there any other chat programs that are easier to use, or preferable for some other reason? Seems I used to have and ICQ name somewhere...

KE
 
Posted by FiredrakeRAGE (Member # 1224) on :
 
If you're running Windows, I would suggest looking up Trillian at http://www.ceruleanstudios.com/ Trillian is by far the best Chat program out there - it allows you to use AIM, ICQ, et al. all in one package.

Oh, and if you want to get AOL IM, you can download it from http://www.aim.com

--Firedrake
 
Posted by Storm Saxon (Member # 1070) on :
 
I am going to bed. Thanks for the offer, though.
 
Posted by FiredrakeRAGE (Member # 1224) on :
 
Sleep is for the weak.

--Firedrake
 
Posted by cperry (Member # 1938) on :
 
Neuromancer is 22 years old? Really, I had no idea! Where in the world have I been? Argh.

I did pick up Cryptonomicon once and wondered if I had enough time and energy to make it through, so I bailed. Next time I'm in a bookstore, though, I will pick up those and Stars My Destination. Thank you all very much for the recs. Others gladly accepted!
 
Posted by cperry (Member # 1938) on :
 
In fact, I'm going to take this conversation elsewhere. See the new thread....
 
Posted by kenmeer livermaile (Member # 2243) on :
 
quote:
I think I am either KnightEnder or Endersshdw on AIM. It's been a while I'll have to check. I am definitely KnightEnder on AOL, and here of course. [Smile] Are there any other chat programs that are easier to use, or preferable for some other reason? Seems I used to have and ICQ name somewhere...
Station # KCNL. Radio C-NILE. I am your midnight mumbler... KnightEnder... or Endershadow... or.. I USED to know my handle. Anyway, creepsters and groaners, the nursing home's got new wax on the floors and the night shift nursy's loose like a goose in the Ex-Lax dispensary... so grab your walkers and boogie down!!!!

That's just too funny, KE. Who am I? Parlor games for Alzheimer patients: I'm thinking of a name with YOUR name on it. Who ARE you?

Here in Washington, it were only 11 AM last night. I don't do chat. It's hardly faster than standard posting or email, and IRQ software is generally packed with surveillance bugs. Just click my email icon to post me personal...
 
Posted by FiredrakeRAGE (Member # 1224) on :
 
kenmeer livermaile said:
quote:
...and IRQ software is generally packed with surveillance bugs.
Trillian also has built in crypto (for use with AIM)

--Firedrake
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
KL, lol [Big Grin] You can call me KE or you can call me...

Sorry, I should have realized you wouldn't want to chat. What the hell else could you have to say? [Wink]

KE (I'm sure)

[ February 17, 2005, 07:27 PM: Message edited by: KnightEnder ]
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
Just watched "Tilt" the poker show on ESPN, it is pretty good so far. Tonight's episode reminded me of something I read in Amarillo Slims book. He was told by his father;

"Someday some gent will come up to you with a sealed pack of playing cards and bet you he can make the Jack of Spades jump up out of that deck and spit coca-cola in your ear. Son, don't bet that man or sure enough you will wind up with a ear full of coke."

That is a homespun Texas way of saying "don't play another man's game". Which the kids on Tilt did tonight and paid the price. Eddie paid extra because he was sleeping with the Matador's daughter. She looks like she would be worth the ass kickin.

cperry started a thread on favorite books which brought up some of the famous authors that I just don't get. Do any of you find that there things that other people just love that you can't stand. A few of mine are:

Kurt Vonnegut, Tolkein and the Hobbits, Asimov (with the exceptiom of some of the Robot Chronicles), the Dune series, and the bands U2 & Rush.

I don't think Backstreet Boys or their ilk should count because they really haven't stood the test of time and they are easy to hate. (Although my wife and oldest son do love Justin Timberlake and whatever his band used to be called.) But, I'm talking about people or things that have stood the test of time.

KE

[ February 18, 2005, 06:01 AM: Message edited by: KnightEnder ]
 
Posted by cperry (Member # 1938) on :
 
Things I never "got":
Bette Midler (I feel guilty admitting this)
Dune
Moby Dick
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
No, you are very brave cperry. I like Bette's duet with Mick Jagger, Beast of Burden, other than that I could take or leaver her. People act like I'm a communist (no offense Ev) when I say I don't like U2.

KE
 
Posted by msquared (Member # 113) on :
 
I think Bette is a great performer. She can sing, act and do comedy. She does not take herself too seriously.

I do love U2. They have been consistant in making great music with a message that does not slap you over the head. I thougth that some of their mid-late 90's stuff was not as strong as thier early work or what they are doing now.

To remain this good and socially relavant after 20 plus years is amazing.

msquared
 
Posted by aupton15 (Member # 1771) on :
 
Love my U2, but I wouldn't brand you a communist for not liking them. I find the more distinctive the sound, the easier it is to feel strongly about a band, either good or bad. I think that's why I've never liked Rush.
 
Posted by cperry (Member # 1938) on :
 
I like the idea of Bette, and I like some of her movies, but most of her songs...well, I just can't take 'em. Esp Wind Beneath My Wings. Run screaming from the room.

Have a friend who just doesn't get the whole U2 craze. They don't bother me.

Okay, here's something I'm going to be crucified for admitting: don't like the Beatles. Never have, even though I've tried. I just don't get it, and it makes me feel as if I must be missing a chromosome or something.
 
Posted by kenmeer livermaile (Member # 2243) on :
 
quote:
Okay, here's something I'm going to be crucified for admitting: don't like the Beatles. Never have, even though I've tried. I just don't get it, and it makes me feel as if I must be missing a chromosome or something.
Broader pop history context should make you feel better: a lot fo folks don't get COunt Basie or Benny Goodman, Lester Young or Bix Beiderbecke.

But in their day, they were IT.

20 years from now kids will be saying, "I don't GET Nirvana."
 
Posted by msquared (Member # 113) on :
 
I DON'T get Nirvana.

msquared
 
Posted by cperry (Member # 1938) on :
 
Um, I'm a lot older than I sound, I guess (just ask my granddaughter)! Count Basie and Benny Goodman work for me. Never heard of Bix, though.
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
I love the Beatles. Have you listened to Norwegian Wood, Friends and Lovers, Yesterday? Some of their early stuff can sound kind of bubble-gummey but Sgt Pepper and The White Album are some of the best music ever written. I don't think you are a communist, but I feel sorry that you are missing out on so much great music. Of course I'm sure people feel the samd for me with U2 and Rush. Oh, my mom doesn't like the Beatles either, and they were her era.

KE
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
Don't you hate it when the last post on the top five threads is yours? Come on people post! I can't argue with myself! Okay, I'm going to play poker, but I'll be back! I expect to see some posts by then.

KE

[ February 18, 2005, 06:35 PM: Message edited by: KnightEnder ]
 
Posted by cperry (Member # 1938) on :
 
Yes, I do hate it! There are a couple Beatles songs I can listen to, but generally, I just change the station. I like the lyrics, usually, a lot more than the tunes themselves.
 
Posted by Everard (Member # 104) on :
 
On an interesting side note, Kurt Vonnegut's grandson teaches English at my old high school. He feud's pretty regularly with his grandfather, to the point they don't speak anymore, and also doesn't "get" Vonnegut's writing. In fact, he's been known to call it, in class "rubbish."
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
The "Stargate" episode tonight was great. It reminded me of some of the more cleverly done X-files were they kinda spoofed themselves.

"SG Atlantis" was okay. The female lead is hot.

Isn't it funny how some beautiful women are not sexy, yet some not traditionaly beautiful women can be very sexy?
And doesn't Major Sheperd remind you of the plumber on Desperate Houswives? They have to be related, or at the very least raised in the same state.

And "Battle Star Galactica" was good but nothing to write home about.

Bill O'reily said that the ACLU wants a secular progressive nation. The horror.

KE
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
Did y'all hear about Montana wanting to require death certificates for aborted fetus?

KE
 
Posted by kenmeer livermaile (Member # 2243) on :
 
quote:
Did y'all hear about Montana wanting to require death certificates for aborted fetus?

They're just paving the way to make sure there's no sheep DNA...
 
Posted by kenmeer livermaile (Member # 2243) on :
 
quote:
Never heard of Bix, though.
Died young. Most of his stuff is from the 20s. Played bright clear relaxed cornet. Sort of the great god father of cool jazz, in a sense. Whereas Louis epitomized le jazz HOT, Bix (who could swing uncannily well) focused on melody, elegance in syncopation, and 'modern' harmony.

Lester Young cites Bix and Frankie Trumbauer (a Bix alumni) as his two chief influences. Had Bix not drank himself into an early grave, Charlie Parker would probably've had to settle for playing, not inventing, bebop.

I thought you were young because I forgot to separate other threads from yours. When the topic is so casual, I tend to let it all flow together (perhaps as relaxation from my self-appointed role as Inspector Rhetoric).

From a NICELY writ article:

Bix

It isn't only that Bix's solo incorporates harmonies new to jazz (which he probably learned from his devotion to Debussy); and it isn't only that Bix's solo is the first fully realized improvisation on the chords rather than the melody of a tune -- creating something utterly new out of its subject matter (Louis Armstrong would inevitably have come up with that on his own, and soon); it's also that this is the first instance of what came to be known as "cool." Bix explores a turf where Armstrong hadn't been and would never go. Armstrong expresses ... well, everything -- his music cascades from his soul into yours. Geniuses like Charlie Parker and John Coltrane would do the same. Beiderbecke's strategy is fundamentally different, even opposite: With the purest of tones he is talking to himself and letting you listen -- the method that Lester Young, Miles Davis, and their followers would favor. In fact, this is one of the few recordings that Lester Young cited as an influence. (Young was the prime influence on Charlie Parker and on what came to be known as "modern" jazz.) As the critic and jazz musician Benny Green would write in 1962, Bix's passage on "Singin' the Blues" is "the most plagiarized and frankly imitated solo in all jazz history.".

When Lester Young seems to... float amid a foot-tapping riff-groove (like "Dickie's Dream"), you're hearing him channel Bix.

I get teary-eyed when I think of guys like Bix and Lester... or Hendrix or Danny Kirwan(who, come to think of it, sounded on electric guitar very much like Bix)...

[ February 19, 2005, 12:17 AM: Message edited by: kenmeer livermaile ]
 
Posted by kenmeer livermaile (Member # 2243) on :
 
Word of the weekend (originally posted on another thread, but deemed appropriate for MC):

excrementitious.

A very prissy way of saying '****ty'. A word that should have been used in Bill & Ted's Excellent Adventure.
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
OM,

My oldest boy loves Corvettes, so if you take any pictures please mail us a copy. Thanks, hope y'all have a good time.

As for the Beatles/music thing, sometimes context has something to do with it. Isn't it amazing how hearing a song can take you back to an exact moment in time? Like I said, my mom dislike the Beatles (big Neil Diamond fan), so I didn't grow up listening to them, and my first in depth exposure to them was when I met my best friend/brother. He loved them and had a tape he'd made of some of his favorites and we would listen to it back and forth from Houston to Austin every weekend. Great memories. (He's the one that died in Can Cun a few years ago, really messed me up, especially coming on the heels of my youngest getting his head crushed in church and being life-flighted to Herman Hospital and almost dying.) [Frown] Thought I was tough before all that.

Just think of the money I'm saving on therapy bills by being a member of OA. [Wink] If I share too much I apologize. But I appreciate y'all listening and being a part of my life. [Smile]

KE

[ February 19, 2005, 08:46 PM: Message edited by: KnightEnder ]
 
Posted by CardassianScot (Member # 787) on :
 
To reply to KE from yesterday, Stargate (Citizen Joe) was OK, Atlantis (Before I Sleep) was good but I agree that it wasn't one of Battlestar Galatica's best (Six Degrees of Seperation), although living in the UK I have to cast my mind back as I saw that episode of BG before Christmas. BTW I hope I got the episodes right, we have different air dates in the UK, we got all of BG before the US and the last few episodes of SG1 and Atlantis before you. It's not often we in the UK get to say that, so I'm taking advantage of it while I can. Although it looks like we'll be doing it again with the new series of Dr Who.
 
Posted by simplybiological (Member # 1344) on :
 
I'm trying to procrastinate and I'm running out of ways to do it...

whatever happened to your thread idea for seeing pictures of people, KE? being shocked at what people look like would be excellent procrastination material.
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
SB,

I'll look. But you could waste time guessing what they look like, and then we could ask them how close we were.

KE
 
Posted by simplybiological (Member # 1344) on :
 
not as fun, KE, not as fun.
 
Posted by WarrsawPact (Member # 1275) on :
 
Ooh, that reminds me, now that my brother is home, I can use his digital camera.

Gonna have to wait a few days to get Tezcatlipoca's pic up though... he's still out of town.
-=-=-=-=-

totally unrelated topic:

Check out this video made largely with personal video cameras and digital cameras by Marines in the battle for Fallujah (including one nice sweeping shot of a captured weapons cache).

It's set with some nice editing skills to three techno tracks, (I think) Crystal Method's "Trip Like I Do," Fatboy Slim's rendition of Steppenwolf's "Magic Carpet Ride," and Crystal Method's "Name of the Game" (some swearing).
 
Posted by Politius (Member # 1756) on :
 
Speaking about videos, did anyone hear about that new Digital camera from Sony that shoots HDTV? At $3300 it's not cheap and it doesn't even do night shot or stills but the next highest HDV camera is $44,000!!!

By the way, my taekwondo school's website is up www.allensdcs.com. It's not a bad website designed by my freind/fellow instructor. I just need to help my freind brag about it so check it out!

By the way, has anyone tried Metal Gear Solid III: Snakeater? What a truly stunning game, not only for the gameplay but for the intense storyline, perfectly crafted into the cold war AND the Metal Gear plot! Truly amazing!!!

[ February 21, 2005, 11:40 AM: Message edited by: Politius ]
 
Posted by cperry (Member # 1938) on :
 
KL - Thanks for the tips on Bix. I will def look for a CD.

I'd rather be thought young than old, I think, so no offense taken at all!
 
Posted by cperry (Member # 1938) on :
 
Ev - Does he give any reason for calling Vonnegut's work rubbish?
 
Posted by kenmeer livermaile (Member # 2243) on :
 
[QUOTE}tips on Bix. I will def look for a CD.[/QUOTE]

He's worth it. If good vintage Clapton has a certain aura, likewise Hendrix, if primo Supremes and early Stevie Wonder exuded a certain... lustre... you'll find that when Bix starts a solo everything becomes altered. The air seems to fill with translucent liquid brass. To be a human being, to do these weird things, just because.. THAT'S what I'm tawkin' bowt!
 
Posted by Everard (Member # 104) on :
 
I can't remember them, cperry... everything I heard was hearsay, since he wasn't required to teach his grandfather... and so didn't. And I never had him as a teacher. My guess is he's got fairly extensive reasons [Smile] From everything I gather, Vonnegut the younger is pretty good critic.
 
Posted by cperry (Member # 1938) on :
 
Egad, KL. You're making me want to go out RIGHT NOW and find a CD!

Ev, just wondered if it was bitterness or an authentic critique. I do know a lot of people don't get Vonnegut. Most of my students just LOVED him (okay, most of my male students!).
 
Posted by kenmeer livermaile (Member # 2243) on :
 
quote:
On an interesting side note, Kurt Vonnegut's grandson teaches English at my old high school. He feud's pretty regularly with his grandfather, to the point they don't speak anymore, and also doesn't "get" Vonnegut's writing. In fact, he's been known to call it, in class "rubbish."
I think Vonnegut is somewhat time-context sensitive. Slaughter-House Five would feel, I aimagine, much different if read today.

And much of his later stuff was definitely a product for its times. Vonnegut's 'gonzo novelism' must seem pretty archaic when compared to today's young authors.

My fave is an ancient short story he wrote about a gizmo that, when turned on, irradiated everyone within its range with raw bliss. Deadly device. Folks so irradiated just sat and grooved while their bodies starved to death. It was written with slightly grotesque humor, not scholck horror tones.

If Vonnegut were my grandfather, his old senile babblings would probably sound to me like his books. I can see me calling them rubbish in those circumstances.
 
Posted by KidA (Member # 1499) on :
 
I think Vonnegut's best novel is the one he wrote as "Kilgore Trout" - it's called Venus on the Half-Shell. It's basically like a very dark Buck Rogers adventure. Very, very dark. And funny.

[ February 22, 2005, 05:07 PM: Message edited by: KidA ]
 
Posted by cperry (Member # 1938) on :
 
He wrote some powerful short stories, too. Or am I thinking of Harlan Ellison? Must go look now...darn.
 
Posted by simplybiological (Member # 1344) on :
 
cperry...
yeah, he wrote short stories. i read "harrison bergeron" in 6th grade and it blew my mind.
 
Posted by cperry (Member # 1938) on :
 
Thanks, Simply. That's the one I was thinking of (Harrison = Harlan?).
 
Posted by simplybiological (Member # 1344) on :
 
everytime i see an ipod commercial, i really want to see someone go as an ipod ad for halloween. i would do it, but i've already got plans in the works.

some do this, take pictures, and satisfy me.
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
Is the Mod back yet? Did he take any pictures of the vettes? What was the Vonnegut story about water? Or a substance that caused all the water on earth to freeze? And yet another good author for kids is Walter Farley of the Black Stallion stories. I had all the credits I needed in the 8th grade so I had three periods of library. It was heaven.

KE

[ February 23, 2005, 06:58 PM: Message edited by: KnightEnder ]
 
Posted by A. Alzabo (Member # 1197) on :
 
quote:
What was the Vonnegut story about water? Or a substance that caused all the water on earth to freeze?
"Cat's Cradle," I think. Ice-9?
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
Thanks AA.

And welcome to OA, Loki.


KE
 
Posted by Politius (Member # 1756) on :
 
I think the best out of ALL has to be Sirens of Titan. That was a book that blew me away. It was so sad, yet at the same time, so funny, (ahem much like all of Vonnegut's books).
 
Posted by EDanaII (Member # 1062) on :
 
Originally posted by KnightEnder:
quote:
And "Battle Star Galactica" was good but nothing to write home about.
Is it me, or are the Cylons starting to appear more Olympian than mechanical?

First off, we now know they "have a plan." Then we get to see Number Sex, Sharon and Doral observing Helo from the rooftops in a fashion that evokes Zeus from Olympus. And then, in this last episode, Number Sex leaves "Baltar's head" for a while, becomes incarnate, and then returns to his head.

And, of course, Baltar's very plight evokes the old saying "Whom the Gods would destroy they first make mad."

Are these really machines hell bent on punishing their former masters? Or the Olympian gods playing their games with humanity.

Just wondering aloud. [Smile]

Ed.
 
Posted by WarrsawPact (Member # 1275) on :
 
I have to read a semi-short novel of my choosing for school, and someone suggested Vonnegut. Which one should I go with?

[ February 24, 2005, 11:06 PM: Message edited by: WarrsawPact ]
 
Posted by Dave at Work (Member # 1906) on :
 
I have read two of his books, "Galapagos" and "Slaughterhouse-Five". Both were good, though I think I enjoyed "Galapagos" better. That may be because the Science Fiction book club I was in at the time discussed it. I really should read some of his other books, but I could definately recommend either of these two without reservation.
 
Posted by Zyne (Member # 117) on :
 
WP: all Vonnegut is a fast read. I second Politus: He doesn't get better than Sirens of Titan.
 
Posted by WarrsawPact (Member # 1275) on :
 
Thanks much! Zyne, Politus, you've been of immense help.
 
Posted by simplybiological (Member # 1344) on :
 
WP, my favorite is Slapstick. In it, the Chinese have figured out how to make themselves tiny (the size of a fingernail or so) to save resources. They also adjust the gravity. It's my favorite.
 
Posted by simplybiological (Member # 1344) on :
 
Also, for the record, the sandwiches at 7-11 ARE actually kinda good. They've had this big ad campaign going about, "hey, we're 7-11, we know, but our sandwiches are pretty darn tasty."

i've had two now, a breakfast one and a lunch one, and i have to say- they ARE pretty good.
 
Posted by cperry (Member # 1938) on :
 
Hear, hear, Simplybio. My favorite is the turkey with the spicy mayo. No one at work can figure out why I pick up a 7-11 sandwich, but they're better than a burger any day.
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
BG was really good again tonight. Interesting that the Galactians are so sure they have a soul, and that the Cylons don't or can't. Of course, the Galactians are multi-theistic idol worshippers, so they are clearly wrong. Amazing how different religions in different times find other's to be ridiculous and clearly wrong, but none of them ever can see that they suffer from exactly the same delusion.

Also, interesting comparison to our recent ventures into torture and dehuminization. The president was great in this one. Starbuck came off as pretty screwed up in a lot of ways.

KE

[ February 25, 2005, 11:09 PM: Message edited by: KnightEnder ]
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
KL was speaking of Errol Flynn in another thread and coincedently, I was watching "WW and the Dixie Dance Kings", starring Burt Reynolds today. In the movie Burt said "I ain't gay, but if I was to go gay, he (Errol Flynn) is the guy I would go for". And Christian Slater in "True Romance" made roughly the same statement about Elvis.

Perhaps we should have a thread concerning who of the opposite sex we would go gay for, if forced? Why don't I think many of you would play? I don't know if I could feel any sexual feelings from a physical standpoint (erection if that was not clear enough) for Tom Cruise , but he is a damn handsome man. Who is next?

In the same vein, the local morning radio show asked who of another "race" you would have sex with, and I called in instantly with a healthy list including Halle Berry, Selma Hayak, Janet Jackson, and Tyra Banks off the top of my head. The DJ accused me of having already given it a lot of thought. Of course hispanic women shouldn't count in my case since the first girl I ever slept with was hispanic and so were many since then
 
Posted by kenmeer livermaile (Member # 2243) on :
 
It's funny. I'm in touch with my bi-sexuality, which is a minor strain of my overall sexuality and barely makes itself known amid my incessant lusting for other women per normal heterosexual married male randiness, but I can't hardly even ponder the question.

I can think of what famous handsome hero icon I'd like to resemble in terms of appearance and personality: Peter O'Toole.

But which one I'd like to get down on my knees for? I guess whichever one my wife felt she'd like to include in a 3-way, if she was ever so inclined (which I highly doubt).

Peter O'Toole and Gene Krupa. Footage of the young Gene drumming are so charismatic. He radiated SUCH groovy good-times joy. And he really WAS a Cool Cat.

But Peter O'Toole in Lawrence or The Lion in Winter was, respectively, SUCH a mesmeringly pure soul and such an adorable jackass of a rake...

A line I always wanted to hear O'Toole say, in one of those avuncular roles he played in the 80s/90s, wherein he counsels young lovers:

(cigar puff...) "LOVE... is like a great ROLLER coaster. It's PERfectly safe -- so long as the both of you hold TIGHTLY to each other... and, for GOD"s sake, whatever you do, don't get OFF until it's OVER..."

If Disney's smart, they've created a role for O'Toole in the next Pirates of the Caribbean movie. He and Depp were meant to work next to each other...
 
Posted by simplybiological (Member # 1344) on :
 
cperry- the turkey was what i had today... it should also be noted that these sandwiches are CHEAP. if you go to a sammich place and get roughly the same thing, it's about $5. the turkey sandwhich at 7-11 is $2.49. PLUS you can get a sour watermelon slurpie, which is pure sex.

KE.. i object to the phrase "go gay for" because i don't think people choose to be gay. i do, however, think sexuality is a continuum, so i think "give audience to that part of me that is gay" might be better.
i'm bi, so the question isn't really that exciting for me. there are plenty of women i find attractive.
 
Posted by cperry (Member # 1938) on :
 
And sometimes the 7-11 sandwiches come with a free Dr. Pepper or something like that. I don't drink Dr. Pepper, but it might be a perk for someone.

Actually, here near DC, I pay 3.29, but that's still half the price of a similarly packed sandwich at some designer deli. The ham sandwiches are great, too. The tuna and chicken salad are ok, just not as good as the sliced meat.
 
Posted by cperry (Member # 1938) on :
 
Women I find appealing: Gina Gershon, Angelina Jolie, Nicole Kidman, Jada Pinkett Smith, Sigourney Weaver.

Women my husband wouldn't mind seeing me go for: Laurie Dhue (Fox News), Selma Hayak, Keira Knightley, Kelly Hu, Raquel Welch (ok, probably a few years ago).

Okay, this is it. I must change my handle now. I can't ever show my face around here again. Too much self-disclosure. (No, no, I'm not blushing; it must be a bit of sunburn -- sun reflecting off the snow and all that.)
 
Posted by kenmeer livermaile (Member # 2243) on :
 
Kidzmom:

Today’s embarrassment of my children occurred while running errands for the funeral this afternoon. En route, I include a stop at the skateboard shop so my boy can buy a hackeysack(sp?). In the store, he asks if we can hang around a bit. Lotsa way cool stuff, he’s thinkin’.

“Naw,” I tell him. “We’ve got a mission list.”

“What’s the mission?,” asks the proprietor.

“Venezuela, Baluchistan, Mariachiville, Nova Scotia…,” I rattle off.

Then I wax political. “Weird times. Suddenly our government’s agenda is mostly expressed in the names of foreign countries. ‘We’re doing Iran next. She’s HOT.’ ”

Snicker.

“What’s up with this stuff?,” I ask him. “Remember when Bush said he wanted bin Laden ‘Dead or Alive?”

Head nod.

“Who wants to hump a DEAD guy?!!!”

That got a laugh.

I see the anteroom. Sign says: ‘Spirit Girl’. (Spirit’s the name of the shop.)

I mince over there in my worst girlieman Bette Midler imitation. Stand at the doorway, hands on hips, upset:

“There’s NO GIRLS in there! Wadda rip.”

Leaving the store, my boy says, “Dad, don’t ever walk like that again.”
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
cperry,

I felt the exact same way when I came back and reread what I wrote. I felt like making some claim of being secure in my manhood to assauge my embarrassment, but then I thought, that saying it in that post would be defeating the purpose. Kinda like you can't say you're cool. If you say you're cool, you aren't. Unless you are the Fonz, I guess.

As SB correctly states, one does not "go gay". You are or you aren't. But, what I meant was, that we are able to see beauty in a member of the same sex. A rose is a rose.

Like I said before, this place is great therapy. And the people here know more about me than most people I know in real life. If I ever run for office I will have to buy you all off first. [Smile]

KE

[ February 26, 2005, 10:12 PM: Message edited by: KnightEnder ]
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
KL,

Hackey-sacks are making a come-back? I would probably hurt myself nowadays.

What funeral? What mission list? Please elucidate.

SB,

I would still love to hear what women you find attractive. [Wink]

KE

[ February 26, 2005, 10:11 PM: Message edited by: KnightEnder ]
 
Posted by kenmeer livermaile (Member # 2243) on :
 
My father-in-law's service was today. Me wife's Dad, me kids' gramps. Called him 'Papa'. Good man.

Mission list was buying dress shirt, some haircuts, some last minutes chores for the gathering after the service.

Hot wimmimz? We'll start with one we've seen: simplybio. She has a slightly stern, slightly sultry girl next door look coupled with a fierce intelligence and a hail fellow well met frankness.

She'd have scared me to death when I was 20.

Famous wimminz: Mary Astor in The Maltese Falcon. Patricia O'Neill. The heroine in the first Indy Jones flick. Maureen O'Hara! Joni Mitchell!!! Linda MaCartney. The tall blond Andrews Sister. Anita O'Day!

You'll find few modern sex symbols in my list because they all blur into one for me. But Gwenyth Paltrow in Sky Captain and the World of Tomorrow made an impression on me.

Oh yeah, what's her face from Thelma & Louise and Dead Man Walking... Susan Sarandon. Yes. Susan Sarandon is very much a siren to me.

But I like my wife best of all.

[ February 27, 2005, 01:10 AM: Message edited by: kenmeer livermaile ]
 
Posted by Jordan (Member # 2159) on :
 
It's unfair for me to voice my honest opinion, because I'm already there. [Wink] Though the guy I'd most like to go with is dead anyway (Alan Turing).

So... the girl I'd be most likely to 'go straight' for is... Damn.

Can I get out of thinking about celebrities who's names I don't know and people only I could know by just saying 'simplybio'? I think the consensus among the straight male population here is that she's hot and smart, and she's sure got my vote. [Smile]
 
Posted by kenmeer livermaile (Member # 2243) on :
 
quote:
Can I get out of thinking about celebrities who's names I don't know and people only I could know by just saying 'simplybio'? I think the consensus among the straight male population here is that she's hot and smart, and she's sure got my vote.
Gurlfreynd, you're becoming a standard of hotness here at Ornery. Hold your head and keep those knockers up!
 
Posted by cperry (Member # 1938) on :
 
KE - Thanks for the reassurance <peeks head out from under the pillow>. I think the anonymity here is a lot like two too many beers <slams pillow back over head>.

OK. I'm over it.

You quoted Simplybio: "...one does not 'go gay.' You are or you aren't." Or perhaps we all stand somewhere on a spectrum, where one side is totally hetero- and the other side is totally homosexual. I think a lot of us, given some honest soul searching, would find we don't stand at one end or the other but instead are somewhere in between -- and that may actually change a bit, depending on a host of other variables (availability being one, being pushed by a bad or good experience being another).

KL - I'm sorry to hear about your father-in-law.

Susan Sarandon was, is, probably always will be hot.

And I want to add Cate Blanchett to my list.

Jordan - By the way, I think we're going with celebs here simply because we all recognize them. As you said, it doesn't quite work to mention folks we know whom others don't, no? But I thought the chick with the cat was kinda cute.
 
Posted by kenmeer livermaile (Member # 2243) on :
 
quote:
KL - I'm sorry to hear about your father-in-law.
Who, by the way, was HOT when he was 20 and in the Navy. A face like a more dignified, less mournful, kinder-eyed Robert Mitchum with THICK wavy hair like (whasshisname?the guy who played Magnum PI).

VERY handsome man. Favorite song was Old Man River. To his credit, while I believe he was as "skyeered of dyin'" as anyone, he was not "tired of living". A good life.

[ February 27, 2005, 02:26 PM: Message edited by: kenmeer livermaile ]
 
Posted by cperry (Member # 1938) on :
 
Tom Selleck. Who shaved it off to play DDE(a worse piece of casting I can't think of right now).

My maternal grandfather used to love to sing "Old Man River." Oddly, he looked a lot like Saddam Hussein (before the rathole).

My paternal grandmother is 93. She's not exactly tired of living; she has just lost all of her good friends, most of her close relatives (including 2 children). She still lives alone, drives (w/o me in the car, thank you anyway), and goes to water aerobics 3 days a week. But I think she'd welcome death with open arms if he arrived tonight. She firmly believes she'll be going to a better place. I am certain that helps.
 
Posted by kenmeer livermaile (Member # 2243) on :
 
quote:
My maternal grandfather used to love to sing "Old Man River."
Oddly, he looked a lot like Saddam Hussein (before the rathole).

Dere's an ol' man called de Tigris-Euphrates;
Dat's de ol' man dat I'd like to be!
What does he care if de world's got troubles?
What does he care if de land ain't free?


Incidentally:

Robeson Lyrics
 
Posted by kenmeer livermaile (Member # 2243) on :
 
AN interesting life:

Maxwell Knight

As well as working for MI5 Knight was a recognized expert in the fields of ornithology and zoology. He was also the successful author of books on natural history. This included Young Field Naturalist's Guide (1952), Bird Gardening (1954), Reptiles in Britain (1965), How to Keep an Elephant (1967), How to Keep a Gorilla (1968) and Be a Nature Detective (1968).

Charles Maxwell Knight died of a heart attack on 27th January, 1968.


Why do I hear simplybio saying, 'all i do is entymology now: i gave up gorilla keeping and elephant-raising. ant-farming is so much more economical.'?
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
SB,

Congratulations on being voted sexiest woman on OA. [Smile] Quite the coveted title. [Wink]

KE

[ February 27, 2005, 07:14 PM: Message edited by: KnightEnder ]
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
m2 was bragging, justifiably, about his son's high score on the SAT, so I thought this might be interesting to him, and the rest of the members here with children. Apparently they are going to change the SAT, a little. What I've read about it sounds reasonable.

Link: SAT Change Houston Chronicle

KE
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
On the lighter side of the news; Michael Jackson has apparenty "killed" an old person. And least he is branching out from his "children only" policy of abuse.

[Frown] Michael Jackson being sued Houston Chronicle

quote:
NEW YORK - An elderly heart attack victim clinging to life was evicted from her hospital room to make way for Michael Jackson when he showed up with the flu, her family charged Friday.

Manuela Gomez Ruiz, 74, died soon after and her relatives now plan to sue Jackson and the Marian Medical Center in Santa Maria, Calif.


Jackson, Bonds, Giambi, and steroids, countless other stars with alcohol and drug problems, pedophile priests, rappers glorifying violence and pimps, are there any good role models anymore?

KE

[ February 27, 2005, 07:26 PM: Message edited by: KnightEnder ]
 
Posted by kenmeer livermaile (Member # 2243) on :
 
quote:
Jackson, Bonds, Giambi, and steroids, countless other stars with alcohol and drug problems, pedophile priests, rappers glorifying violence and pimps, are there any good role models anymore?
Bart Simpsons's sister. She's an angel, and she plays a mean jazz sax.

But, since Fred Rogers died, we've been a nation in need of a new hero...
 
Posted by simplybiological (Member # 1344) on :
 
the title needs be more cautious than that... should probably be sexiest woman on ornery who has posted a picture recently. my guess is plenty of the girls around here are hot (i have this notion that zyne is, though i have no way of knowing). plus, the kenmeer propaganda machine latched on to me some while back...

for the record:
men: i'm absolutely riveted by gale harold, who plays brian on queer as folk. depending on the angle and expression of his face, he's either gorgeous or kinda froggy looking. his body is rather sublime. i think randy harrison, also from that show, might be hot in a few more years. i'm also into james spader, henry rollins, jason lee, jonny lee miller (he played sick boy in trainspotting).

women: selma hayek is hot (this seems to be generally agreed upon), kate moenning (who is way too skinny, but has something about her), christian ricci, scarlett johannsson, audrey tautou
 
Posted by cperry (Member # 1938) on :
 
Simplybio - Have you had the 7-11 Mediterranean style turkey on tomato basil bread? I've never seen it before. Just ate one. Not too bad, but I'll probably end up going back to the smoked turkey on whole wheat for my standard.

Oh, go ahead and enjoy the crown. [Smile] It's fun, isn't it?
 
Posted by kenmeer livermaile (Member # 2243) on :
 
quote:
plus, the kenmeer propaganda machine latched on to me some while back...
To be precise, the GHOST in kenmeer's propaganda machine.

I have a Barbie voodoo doll retrofitted and reverse-polarized. Sticking needles into it after burning an antique E-Z Wider rolling paper with the person's name on it produces good things for the person.

I have blessed you, mon ami.

And no, any mysterious stimulations you may feel are not from me. Not only am I not a doll pervert, but Barbie has no functioning erogenous zones.
 
Posted by kenmeer livermaile (Member # 2243) on :
 
Besides, I did this only as a gift, not an endorsement. For my money, kidzmom is STILL the hottest wench on board [Smile] Then OhPuhLeez. You're third runner-up, simplybio. Too young for me. Like I said elsewhere, with the effect of elevating a farting in-crowd, Grow Up Kid. (JUST kidding...!!!)

I'm not QUITE a Dirty OLD Man, but I'm not that spry these days. Besides, I bake ugly pies [Cool]
 
Posted by kenmeer livermaile (Member # 2243) on :
 
Contesting Conundra!!!

(Tympanic bing-bong in background, with intermittent, dignifiedly muted fanfare)

conundrum: [16th century iniversity Latin slang for pedant, pedantic whim, word play, etc; early spelling quonundrum,
1. a riddle whose answer is a pun. Example: "What's the difference between a bird with one wing and one with two?" Answer "It's a matter of a pinion." 2. any puzzling question or problem.

Eschewing the latter, broader definition, I, Kenmeer of Livermaile, don disguise and hie me to the Nottingham Sherrif's Conundrum Contest.

Q: How does an undercover folk hero feel infiltrating an archery contest feel?
A: All aquiver.
Q: For what did he expose himself to such great risk?
A: A beau.

for simplybio:
Q:When does an eye see spots?
A:When it’s an oscelli.

A Holier Grail than a mere conundrum would be a self-referential conundrum, that is, a conundrum whose whole is greater than the sum of its parts, as in the cited example, where in the riddle's answer is not just a phenoetic pun but also contains semantic content meaningful to the question.

Also, inverted conundra, in which the answer asks a question answered by a pun hidden in the riddle.

Paradoxes, of course, render Triple Word Score. A favorite trope of mine perhaps provides a basic foormula for such doubly and trebly twisted creatures:

'tautological oxymoron' (which would require, wouldn't it, a doubly self-canceling phrase? a TA would, in effect, sustain itself by canceling itself twice, a vampire that sees itself by by viewing its reflection in a second mirror)

While I post this in a purely abstract pursuit of word play, I'm sadly afeared that way way too many TAs will be found in the realm of political slogans, punditry and the like.
 
Posted by simplybiological (Member # 1344) on :
 
quote:
for simplybio:
Q:When does an eye see spots?
A:When it’s an oscelli.

i get the other ones, but i haven't the vaguest idea what you're getting at here. thing one: it's spelled "ocelli" and the singular is "ocellus." thing two: ocelli lack a lens, they only see light and dark, no spots at all.

maybe i know too much.
 
Posted by kenmeer livermaile (Member # 2243) on :
 
I spelled it wrong. Ocelus/ocelli cross over via ocellated into 'having spots'.

Obscure but the pun called me...

Maybe you don't know too much but know her sister?

[ March 01, 2005, 11:13 PM: Message edited by: kenmeer livermaile ]
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
Anybody watching the show "House"? It is one of the best shows on television. Very well written witty dialogue and characters you care about. I highly recomend it.

KE
 
Posted by simplybiological (Member # 1344) on :
 
enh. ocelli is just not close enough in meaning or sound to ocellated and i just don't buy it.

KE,
i love house. i tape it and use it as a reward for finishing my work.
 
Posted by kenmeer livermaile (Member # 2243) on :
 
quote:
enh. ocelli is just not close enough in meaning or sound to ocellated and i just don't buy it.
Could I sell you a bridge then? Like so (from my 1960 Webster's):

ocellus (pl. ocelli):....2.an eyelike spot, as on a peacock's feathers

ocellation:...2 an eyelike spot

ocellated:...2.having an ocellus or ocelli

[ March 02, 2005, 01:44 AM: Message edited by: kenmeer livermaile ]
 
Posted by kenmeer livermaile (Member # 2243) on :
 
quote:
Maybe you don't know too much but know her sister?
Just to be clear: the above wisecrack wasn't a diss on you saying maybe you know too much. I think I heard that remark in the spirit in which you offered it, which I believe was one of ironic, gentle, self-mockery.

I was just borrowing a really lame old Broucho Marx and inserting it there.
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
Dagonee gave us a link to this great site that makes it unecessary to register everytime you want to read the "rest" of the story at a new site. It's called BugMeNot.com

It's free. What you do is go to the site, paste in the name of the site you are attempting to access, and click on "Show Logins". It then gives you a registered name and password. (Somebody that is registered there gave it to BugMeNot) Copy and paste the User Name & Password, and that's it. Thanks Dagonee [Smile]

KE
 
Posted by cperry (Member # 1938) on :
 
Bad conundra:

Q: How did the chicken farmer like his new boots?
A: He found them impeccable.

Q: What did the autopsy report say?
A: The patient couldn’t stop coffin.

Q: What did the politician request after the close race?
A: A retaliation.

Q: After his third shot into a bunker, what did the golfer’s pals hear?
A: Course language.
 
Posted by kenmeer livermaile (Member # 2243) on :
 
cperry:

Gurlfreyn, you be GOOD at this.
 
Posted by cperry (Member # 1938) on :
 
Really? I felt kinda corny. I'm still not happy with the coffin one. There's gotta be a better way to get there.
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
I liked them.

KE
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
KL, I just watched a Star Trek the Next Generation, and in it Riker as a Ensign fresh out of the Acadamy grabbed a phaser and defended his Captain agains mutineers. 12 years later he and the Captain are back on the same ship and Riker said he did what he did back then because he was young, and that if he had it to do now he would point the phaser at the Captain. Talk about art imitating life.

Since it is a truism that this kind of thing takes place, is there anyway to talk about it without being labled an ageist?

I have mentioned that I have changed many of the views I held so strongly when I was young, 20 or so, and in some ways I think this has made me less apt to be "certain" about many things now. I realize that if I was so sure then that I was right, and then changed my mind, might I not change it again in the future?

I was going to ask if there is anyway for young people to get perspective, or wisdom, or whatever you want to call it, without having to spend the time it takes for most of us? Now I'm questioning whether it would be worthwhile if there was?

If it is, maybe it is enough to realize that no matter how strongly held your beliefs, there is the possibility that they will one day change, and not to tie, too tightly, your ego to your beliefs. Changing your beliefs when the information, or over time, you, change, does not reflect badly on you as a person and is always a possibility.

We are all strong-willed people here at OA, and we believe what we believe, but I think it is both a strength and a weakness of age that you learn you might not be as "right" about things as you once believed.

KE

[ March 02, 2005, 04:23 PM: Message edited by: KnightEnder ]
 
Posted by cperry (Member # 1938) on :
 
KE - I like House, too. HOwever, I've only seen 1 episode, and now we have no televisions, so I suspect I'll not be watching it anymore. Alas. Also, isn't it on opposite Veronica Mars? That's what we used to watch on Tuesday nights, before we tossed the tvs.
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
I love Veronica Mars, we usually watch it, and Tivo House to watch before bed.

KE
 
Posted by cperry (Member # 1938) on :
 
Yeah, I wanna be Veronica when I grow up. 8)
 
Posted by kenmeer livermaile (Member # 2243) on :
 
quote:
I was going to ask if there is anyway for young people to get perspective, or wisdom, or whatever you want to call it, without having to spend the time it takes for most of us? Now I'm questioning whether it would be worthwhile if there was?
A continual construction/deconstruction process? (A sentiment, ironically, very dear to the philosophy of improvement through disruptive intervention via force that War speaks of.)

The more indoctrination of valid working systems on the one hand (what we'd call a solid education and which a few of us have actually enjoyed) and the more and more powerful challenges to those indoctrinations on the other hand, is the best I can think of now.

One difference often noted between 'younger' and 'elder' is that the more elderly one is, the more often one (probably) has been told, in so many words or actions, to grow up.

After awhile, instead of defending one's maturity or at least egalitarian stature as a peer among peers, one tends to inspect oneself for flaws.

One a good day. On a bad day one generally kicks the offender in the euphemisms...
 
Posted by kenmeer livermaile (Member # 2243) on :
 
quote:
Really? I felt kinda corny. I'm still not happy with the coffin one. There's gotta be a better way to get there.
GREAT punchline. Maybe tighten up the question a bit? As in, what did the autopsy cite as cause of death?
 
Posted by simplybiological (Member # 1344) on :
 
i have the scrubs/house problem. i couldn't get into veronica mars.
 
Posted by cperry (Member # 1938) on :
 
SB - ya really gotta suspend your disbelief to make veronica work. but i wish i'd been such a tough b**** in high school. We never got into scrubs, for whatever reason. now, without TV -- well, it's rather moot.

KL - yeah, i think it's the question that didn't work for me. i like yours better.
 
Posted by kenmeer livermaile (Member # 2243) on :
 
Q: What is the plural Latinism for a shoe salesman's shoe size rulers?
A: Graffiti.

Me daughter was a scrubster for a year or so at high school. With flair but scrubby. Then she started doing makeup and tradionally alluring attire. Quoth she: "This butch **** ain't working for me."

But, whenever she wants to sleep in, she's a pro at wearing to school the sweats she slept in. She definitely has PRESENCE.
 
Posted by EDanaII (Member # 1062) on :
 
@ KnightEnder
quote:
I was going to ask if there is anyway for young people to get perspective, or wisdom, or whatever you want to call it, without having to spend the time it takes for most of us?
And the answer to that question is to "listen, evaluate, conclude and reassess." Always listen to what others have to say. Always evaluate those beliefs. And always draw conclusions from your evaluation. And always reassess your own.

Or, in other words, "use your brain."

That's EXACTLY WHY God (or the fates, or evolution, or [insert your favorite explanation here]) gave it to you. [Smile]

Es mi dos centavos...

Ed.

Edited for focus.

[ March 03, 2005, 02:22 PM: Message edited by: EDanaII ]
 
Posted by simplybiological (Member # 1344) on :
 
kenmeer, we speak of scrubs the television show. not the attire.

my general style has been described as "fifteen year old boy chic... but like... an elegant and sparkley fifteen year old boy..."
 
Posted by kenmeer livermaile (Member # 2243) on :
 
Not exactly a conundrum but yeast for one:

War Mars peace

(inspired by headline that said:

Violence Mars Nigerian Strikes
 
Posted by Haggis (Member # 2114) on :
 
"An elegant and sparkley fifteen year old boy"?!?

So sort of an adolescent Queer Eye chic?
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
We used to watch "Scrubs" all the time, but it has gotten lost in the shuffle. Definitely, IMO third behind "House" and "Veronica Mars". There was a show called "Life As We Know It" on ABC that was very good, but it was on ABC and they do stupid things, like since it is doing well move it so it is up against "The OC" and when it doesn't do as well there, instead of moving it, or putting it in the place of one of their many crappy shows, they just cancel it. Genius.

Stacy and I just watched Zach Braff from "Scrubs" movie "Garden State" and we loved it.

KE

[ March 03, 2005, 02:31 PM: Message edited by: KnightEnder ]
 
Posted by Everard (Member # 104) on :
 
I'm ashamed to say that my current TV addiction is Everwood.
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
Ev, (spoiler if you haven't seen the last ep)

We watch it religiously and have since it first started. Can you believe it is going to be six weeks until we find out if Madison tells Ephrom about the baby, or whether she even had it or not?

It's amazing we get anything done. How is throwing out the TV working for you Cperry?

KE
 
Posted by simplybiological (Member # 1344) on :
 
veronica couldn't hold my attention, she just couldn't.

i am fully, 100% unashamed of my addiction to the OC.

elegant sparkley 15 year old boy chic is, apparently, guy's jeans, skater shoes, tshirts... with jewelry and cardigans and the occasional shirt/shoe departure. but i never, EVER wear khaki, and i own 2 dresses and one skirt.
 
Posted by cperry (Member # 1938) on :
 
I'm okay with it, having lived w/o a TV before and being a compulsive reader (cereal boxes, shampoo bottles, you know if you're one!). My hubby is okay now but wonders if he'll make it through football season. Our 19 year old son is the obvious sufferer, as well as the grounds for our decision -- "If you're not going to do your homework, that's fine. But you're not going to watch tv or play x-box either." (So there.) (Do we sound as puerile as I feel right this moment? We really are trying to help him graduate!).

Funny side effect -- I was in Coconuts to buy a CD, and the cashier asked me if I wanted to reserve a copy of some video due out next week. I said, "Oh, we don't have a TV." And enjoyed it!
 
Posted by cperry (Member # 1938) on :
 
KL - "War Mars peace

(inspired by headline that said:

Violence Mars Nigerian Strikes"

fermenting....
 
Posted by kenmeer livermaile (Member # 2243) on :
 
quote:
kenmeer, we speak of scrubs the television show. not the attire.
It's amazing I 'get' ANY TV references anymore. I see maybe 2 hours a week max, most of that peripherally.

But in a sense, I still made a TV connection, for it's my impression that shows like ER et al put the word 'scrubs' into mainstream vernacular.

[ March 03, 2005, 03:32 PM: Message edited by: kenmeer livermaile ]
 
Posted by Everard (Member # 104) on :
 
Yeah, KE, I saw the last episode. Been watching religiously for two years. I can't believe we have to wait for MID APRIL!
 
Posted by kenmeer livermaile (Member # 2243) on :
 
quote:
elegant sparkley 15 year old boy chic is, apparently, guy's jeans, skater shoes, tshirts... with jewelry and cardigans and the occasional shirt/shoe departure. but i never, EVER wear khaki, and i own 2 dresses and one skirt.
I can envision it and, hey, that IS sparkingly elegant.

Who here remembers when the closest thing to 'skater shoes' were those funky hybrid sneakers that Sears made/sold called Jeepers?

To a sparkley 10-year old boy as I was at the time, Jeepers were SO uncool, at least compared to a pair of P.F. Flyers... (I'm envisioning Cayce Pollard wincing and doubling over at the overt logosity of P.F. Flyers...)
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
KL, I would bet on St. Elsewhere if not MASH.

Cperry, detergent boxes when there is nothing else to read in the bathroom. No tv, did he look at you like you were a Martian? I would do the same thing if my boy wasn't doing his homework. The X-box and computer are the first thing gone. But they know that and hardly ever have to be punished.

KE
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
Without Honor Baseball is Doomed

I started a thread on the Ornery American Sports Writer side of the forum if anybody is interested in baseball, future science, or honor in sports.


KE
 
Posted by cperry (Member # 1938) on :
 
Oh, we always have magazines in the bathroom. Yuck, I know. But there you have it. Oh, he despises it. Asks every day if we'll put the TV back. Our response: Have you done your homework? Do you want to study for your end-of-course test? Whereupon he throws himself passionately on the couch and sulks energetically for the rest of the evening. Or text-messages until he can find someone to go out with him. (He's 19 and a senior. Kind of tough to restrict everything without pushing him out entirely. That may eventually happen. June is looking mighty far away right now!)
 
Posted by cperry (Member # 1938) on :
 
Not getting anywhere with the war mars peace possibility, but here are some otha conundra (egad, KL, I think I'm addicted):

Q: What did the sperm yell to his companions when he reached the egg first?
A: It’s ova!

Q: What did the dieter exclaim as the scale’s needle crept higher?
A: Not that weigh!
 
Posted by kenmeer livermaile (Member # 2243) on :
 
quote:
Whereupon he throws himself passionately on the couch and sulks energetically for the rest of the evening. Or text-messages until he can find someone to go out with him. (He's 19 and a senior. Kind of tough to restrict everything without pushing him out entirely. That may eventually happen. June is looking mighty far away right now!)
I'm envisioning a video game where the kid is the TV/monitor display. Controls are nerve-jacked into the base of his skull. To do a kick-flip, or pick his nose, the kid tweaks a controller (his hands remain autonomous but the rest of hois body is inert to all input but that of the controller.

Then, some genius invents this way cool game called HOMEWORK...
 
Posted by simplybiological (Member # 1344) on :
 
i love text messaging with an unholy passion.

i STARTED using it because i can't ever hear when i use my phone in a bar, so texting someone to find out where they are is much better...

Now i am addicted. i use most of my 100 a month every month. no longer do i drunk-dial, i drunk-text.

i also greatly identify with "sulking energetically"..

is there some reason he can't just get his GED? i mean, i KNOW that's not as good, but if it comes to that?
 
Posted by cperry (Member # 1938) on :
 
I was hoping someone would know what I was talking about! (I see so much of it lately.)

GED would be tough. He moved to America from Russia when he was 14, so his English is iffy. He LOATHES reading. We've had him tested for a learning disability, but no go. So the upshot is we've got a 2nd language kid whose talents def do NOT lie in his verbal skills, whose formative years were almost def lacking in any kind of positive support, whose internal motivation level lies at about -3 on a scale of 1 to 10, and whose age allows him to move out at any time and try to live on his own.

Just in case any of y'all were thinking about becoming parents. [Smile]
 
Posted by cperry (Member # 1938) on :
 
Text messaging -- I hate it because I know it MUST be my age, but I just don't get it. I do see the appeal of it in noisy places or places where you can't talk, but why TM when you don't have to? I've seen pics of celebs walking and TMing and think: I would fall down if I had to type and walk at the same time. Any insight would be GREATLY appreciated. I do plan to go back to the classroom one day and don't want to be totally out of touch (knowing that we might have cellular implants by then!).
 
Posted by cperry (Member # 1938) on :
 
"I'm envisioning a video game where the kid is the TV/monitor display. Controls are nerve-jacked into the base of his skull. To do a kick-flip, or pick his nose, the kid tweaks a controller (his hands remain autonomous but the rest of hois body is inert to all input but that of the controller."

Wasn't there an old Star Trek episode like this?

"Then, some genius invents this way cool game called HOMEWORK..."

Actually, if schools are going to survive, we're going to have to learn how to tap into this new digital universe. <runs screaming from the room, pulling out hair>
 
Posted by kenmeer livermaile (Member # 2243) on :
 
quote:
Q: What did the sperm yell to his companions when he reached the egg first?
A: It’s ova!

Now THAT one hit a new high mark. It puns not only item but purpose. It's as good as the textbook one citing "a matter of a pinion".

Evolution in action, I tell ye. We beez evawlvin!
(Uh-oh, I feel one coming on):

Q: What's the naturally selected difference between a cloaca and a vagina?
A: The latter's a vulvan.

I know, I know, when is a condundrum like a fart?
When it stinks...

"To do a kick-flip, or pick his nose, the kid tweaks a controller (his hands remain autonomous but the rest of hois body is inert to all input but that of the controller."

I guess he could pick his nose without using the remote... but where would the challenge be in THAT!?!

quote:
unholy passion.
You really ARE missing that religious gene!

quote:
...whose age allows him to move out at any time and try to live on his own.
Hard work and relative deprivation are GREAT motivators. McDonalds has been a greater 'molder of men' than has been recognized. Sort of replaced being drafted into boot camp as stern builder of character.

(flinging a greasy spatula across the parking lot): "GIVE me that text book! I'z a NEW man!!!"

[ March 04, 2005, 03:09 PM: Message edited by: kenmeer livermaile ]
 
Posted by cperry (Member # 1938) on :
 
"Hard work and relative deprivation are GREAT motivators. McDonalds has been a greater 'molder of men' than has been recognized. Sort of replaced being drafted into boot camp as stern builder of character."

In most cases, I would count on that. However, given his background and the future he must have envisioned having living in an orphanage in Siberia, I suspect that flinging a greasy spatula would be just fine, as long as it allowed time in the evenings for ritual obliviating in front of a screen. I try not to be disappointed because I really do believe he's not going to have a miserable life. But it's tough, knowing that he could be capable of more -- with a little bit of effort.
 
Posted by cperry (Member # 1938) on :
 
"Evolution in action, I tell ye. We beez evawlvin!"

Here's one, but I can't get it in QA format:

“Where did my hair go?” he bald.
 
Posted by kenmeer livermaile (Member # 2243) on :
 
quote:
Here's one, but I can't get it in QA format:

“Where did my hair go?” he bald.

(shakuhachi wail... crackle of fire for making tea...) Sensai: "You see not the forest for the trees, Grasshopper. Look again. Focus on the QUESTION MARK... [Big Grin] )

Which reminds me of my fave political pun for dissing party of negative choice:

They can't see the poorest for the sleaze...

[ March 04, 2005, 03:44 PM: Message edited by: kenmeer livermaile ]
 
Posted by cperry (Member # 1938) on :
 
Hop hop, but I can't figure out an answer.

Q: "Where did my hair go?"
A: he bald.

Dead end. (split end?) Argh.

Or in central Florida, where we used to say, "Can't see the tourists for the retirees."
 
Posted by Locus (Member # 540) on :
 
Ornery is rapidly becoming my humor site of choice.
 
Posted by simplybiological (Member # 1344) on :
 
cperry,
that episode where everyone was playing The Game, wearing those little headsets and kinda ignoring everything...

turned out to be a ploy by this alien race so they could easily take over the enterprise...

and wesley crusher saved the day.

speaking of wesley crusher, i met wil wheaton a few months ago, and he TOTALLY still looks like wesley and i was absolutely regressed into a 14 year old when i talked to him. i left and called everyone i knew and left messages saying, "I JUST TOUCHED WESLEY CRUSHER!"

...in case anyone doubted my nerd credentials.
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
Wesley, oh it was Star Trek: The Next Generation. I wondered why it didn't sound familiar. I have watched a lot of ST: TNG but not everyone over and over again like the original.

However, I think Picard is a better Captain than Kirk. Kirk really should have been the first officer he put himself at risk far too often.

On Stargate Atlantis the other day, the male lead was having sex with an "alien" and the McCoy/like character said: "Oh, my god, he is Captain Kirk". That's almost as funny as when in the first ep of Stargate, Captain Carter said that they had to "MacGyver"(sp?) something together.

KE
 
Posted by simplybiological (Member # 1344) on :
 
much like in mallrats where ethan suplee looks at shannon doherty and goes, "brenda?"

that's a 90210 joke. in case people are older than me.

meta jokes are not my big thing, honestly.
 
Posted by kenmeer livermaile (Member # 2243) on :
 
Q: "Where did my hair go?"
A: he bald.

Exactly. Except that it's so perfect it doesn't NEED a Q&A.

"Where did my hair go?," he bald. If one hid the pun by writing orthographically 'he bawled', it would be perhaps more obscurely clear?

"Form follows function": here the form IS the function.

[ March 04, 2005, 05:41 PM: Message edited by: kenmeer livermaile ]
 
Posted by kenmeer livermaile (Member # 2243) on :
 
Long long ago (at least 20 years back) I heard a lead up to a punchline in a bar. The din had parted and I heard the barkeep, leaning over to a customer, say:

"So Jesus says to the sandalmaker..." Din returns. Couldn't hear the punchline. But the customer is obviously cracking up. Was too shy back then to ask for a repeat.

Five years ago, at my Dad's funeral, an answer popped into my head.

Jesus asks Sauly the Sandalmaker to repair his sandals.

"They got these big spike holes in the soles."

'2 days, 2 dinari,' says Sauly.

" 's a deal."

J runs into Sauly 2 days later at the wine stall.

"Hey, Jeez," says Sauly. "Let's stop by my place after this glass and get your sandals. They're fixed."

'Can't,' says Jesus. 'I'm having my my nails done.'

!
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
The fat guy staring at the picture? That was hilarious. Stacy still watches 90210 on the Soap Channel. Jeanie Garth may be the most beautiful woman ever.

KE
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
"Where did my hair go?," he bald.

That's funny.

KE
 
Posted by cperry (Member # 1938) on :
 
I love ST: TNG (because it's a nice vision of the future, rather than a depressing one, and because Jean Luc Picard is pretty darn hot, etc.). That episode was a good one. Ashley Judd was in it too, but she caved to the temptations.
 
Posted by cperry (Member # 1938) on :
 
Yeah, but I think:
"Where did my hair go?" he bawled.

is better. Gotta work harder for it, as KL said.

The nails joke is pretty bad.

Here's a new one:

Q: What did the lord say when the serfs went on strike?
A: Stop that; it's futile!
 
Posted by cperry (Member # 1938) on :
 
Can you tell I'm stupidly addicted?
 
Posted by Everard (Member # 104) on :
 
If you've got the right accent...

"I'm outta here like a bald man"
 
Posted by kenmeer livermaile (Member # 2243) on :
 
A: Stop that; it's futile!

From a new high to a new low: yes, you ARE addicted... HA! That just popped out on its own without me trying.
 
Posted by kenmeer livermaile (Member # 2243) on :
 
I am glad and proud to see such new heights of intellectual pursuit and discourse unfold.

So these 3 gay bars walk into a municipal licensing bureau...

[ March 04, 2005, 10:40 PM: Message edited by: kenmeer livermaile ]
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
Q: What did the lone standing pin say to the bowling ball?
A: Spare me!

Hey, that is the first one I ever made up, so cut me some slack!

Anybody ever hear of India Salyk music? I've seen the modern version of it in two shows, "The Guru" with Heather Grahm, and "Hollywood Ballywood", and I really like it.

KE
 
Posted by kenmeer livermaile (Member # 2243) on :
 
Why cut slack? It's excellent!
 
Posted by kenmeer livermaile (Member # 2243) on :
 
Anybody know a name (offical, if possiblre) for words whose meaning becomes mutually ambiguous byu changing one letyter?

For example, elsewhere I typoed 'gried' for 'grief'.

It occurred to me that gried could become greed with one letter change just as easily as it could become grief.

Also, there IS a word, and I CAN'T recall it, but desperately wish to know, that means: to say something by saying you're not going to say it'.

This principle is demonstrated by the popular phrase: 'don't go there', when 'there' has not been clearly stated, and perhaps not even implied, but is easily inferred. Most often used with imminent sexual double entendres. By saying 'don't go there', one has poretty much gone there.

In more sophisticated usage, especially in debate, it is an excellent way of slapping one's opponent with the ghost of a glove.

I WANT to know what that word IS!!!!
 
Posted by kenmeer livermaile (Member # 2243) on :
 
An Old Chestnut from an aging, probably no longer existent, corner of the web:

Imagine if you will... the leader of the fifth invader force speaking to the commander in chief...

"They're made out of meat."

"Meat?"

"Meat. They're made out of meat."

"Meat?"

"There's no doubt about it. We picked several from different parts of the planet, took them aboard our recon vessels, probed them all the way through. They're completely meat."

"That's impossible. What about the radio signals? The messages to the stars."

"They use the radio waves to talk, but the signals don't come from them. The signals come from machines."

"So who made the machines? That's who we want to contact."

"They made the machines. That's what I'm trying to tell you. Meat made the machines."

"That's ridiculous. How can meat make a machine? You're asking me to believe in sentient meat."

"I'm not asking you, I'm telling you. These creatures are the only sentient race in the sector and they're made out of meat."

"Maybe they're like the Orfolei. You know, a carbon-based intelligence that goes through a meat stage."

"Nope. They're born meat and they die meat. We studied them for several of their life spans, which didn't take too long. Do you have any idea the life span of meat?"

"Spare me. Okay, maybe they're only part meat. You know, like the Weddilei. A meat head with an electron plasma brain inside."

"Nope. We thought of that, since they do have meat heads like the Weddilei. But I told you, we probed them. They're meat all the way through."

"No brain?"

"Oh, there is a brain all right. It's just that the brain is made out of meat!"

"So... what does the thinking?"

"You're not understanding, are you? The brain does the thinking. The meat."

"Thinking meat! You're asking me to believe in thinking meat!"

"Yes, thinking meat! Conscious meat! Loving meat. Dreaming meat. The meat is the whole deal! Are you getting the picture?"

"Omigod. You're serious then. They're made out of meat."

"Finally, Yes. They are indeed made out meat. And they've been trying to get in touch with us for almost a hundred of their years."

"So what does the meat have in mind?"

"First it wants to talk to us. Then I imagine it wants to explore the universe, contact other sentients, swap ideas and information. The usual."

"We're supposed to talk to meat?"

"That's the idea. That's the message they're sending out by radio. 'Hello. Anyone out there? Anyone home?' That sort of thing."

"They actually do talk, then. They use words, ideas, concepts?"

"Oh, yes. Except they do it with meat."

"I thought you just told me they used radio."

"They do, but what do you think is on the radio? Meat sounds. You know how when you slap or flap meat it makes a noise? They talk by flapping their meat at each other. They can even sing by squirting air through their meat."

"Omigod. Singing meat. This is altogether too much. So what do you advise?"

"Officially or unofficially?"

"Both."

"Officially, we are required to contact, welcome, and log in any and all sentient races or multibeings in the quadrant, without prejudice, fear, or favor. Unofficially, I advise that we erase the records and forget the whole thing."

"I was hoping you would say that."

"It seems harsh, but there is a limit. Do we really want to make contact with meat?"

"I agree one hundred percent. What's there to say?" `Hello, meat. How's it going?' But will this work? How many planets are we dealing with here?"

"Just one. They can travel to other planets in special meat containers, but they can't live on them. And being meat, they only travel through C space. Which limits them to the speed of light and makes the possibility of their ever making contact pretty slim. Infinitesimal, in fact."

"So we just pretend there's no one home in the universe."

"That's it."

"Cruel. But you said it yourself, who wants to meet meat? And the ones who have been aboard our vessels, the ones you have probed? You're sure they won't remember?"

"They'll be considered crackpots if they do. We went into their heads and smoothed out their meat so that we're just a dream to them."

"A dream to meat! How strangely appropriate, that we should be meat's dream."

"And we can mark this sector unoccupied."

"Good. Agreed, officially and unofficially. Case closed. Any others? Anyone interesting on that side of the galaxy?"

"Yes, a rather shy but sweet hydrogen core cluster intelligence in a class nine star in G445 zone. Was in contact two galactic rotations ago, wants to be friendly again."

"They always come around."

"And why not? Imagine how unbearably, how unutterably cold the universe would be if one were all alone."

[written by the Mark of A. Moctezuma, 01/25/96]
 
Posted by cperry (Member # 1938) on :
 
"Spare me!" That was good! Very good!

This one is probably not original (I'm sure it's on a Hallmark card somewhere), although I did come to it on my own:

Q: How do you know you're old?
A: When you're all groan.
 
Posted by kenmeer livermaile (Member # 2243) on :
 
"Q: How do you know you're old?
A: When you're all groan."

Ewww... you could have spared us that one, cp. [Wink]
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
Q: What does a meteorologist predict?
A: Whether...

I know.

KE

[ March 08, 2005, 12:06 PM: Message edited by: KnightEnder ]
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
KL, I used to wouldn't use emoticons at first either. But, they really are invaluable in a format in which no one can see your face. [Smile]

KE
 
Posted by Zyne (Member # 117) on :
 
Thirsty little albino penises: http://www.ironhymen.com/
 
Posted by simplybiological (Member # 1344) on :
 
Zyne
that website has been in my favorite places for a couple weeks and it makes me smile ALWAYS.
 
Posted by simplybiological (Member # 1344) on :
 
oooh... we should have a "dorkiest thing i did today" conversation.

Today, I got sweaty outside, and then the AC in the classroom made me feel clammy... so before students came in i put the tshirt i had on under my sweater in the insect drying oven to make it all dry and toasty (only took 10 minutes) and then put it back on.

i also went to lunch with three pairs of insect forceps (like soft tweezers) stuck in my hair at various angles.
 
Posted by kenmeer livermaile (Member # 2243) on :
 
Iron Hymen

I suppose the male corollary would be Marshmallow Penis?

Wait until we can design boys and and girls with removable gonads...

[ March 09, 2005, 10:59 PM: Message edited by: kenmeer livermaile ]
 
Posted by A. Alzabo (Member # 1197) on :
 
quote:
Wait until we can design boys and and girls with removable gonads...

They're already removable, they're just hard to put back.
 
Posted by kenmeer livermaile (Member # 2243) on :
 
Ouch! (rim shot on kenmeer's had)
 
Posted by Zyne (Member # 117) on :
 
They have special ovens for that?

V. cool hair. "Step away from the pile, or it shall prod at you."
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
Q: Where do old folks go to the bathroom?
A: Depends.

KE
 
Posted by kenmeer livermaile (Member # 2243) on :
 
The following is an out of context excerpt from a simplybio post. By itself, it has a mysterious allure, a call of the Miscellaneous Chat wild...

"let's call him Bob"

What kind of themes might we spin off this riff?
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
"Call me Ishmael."

"What about Bob?"

"Let's call her Anna."

Which way do we want to go?

KE

[ March 10, 2005, 07:01 PM: Message edited by: KnightEnder ]
 
Posted by Adam Lassek (Member # 1514) on :
 
quote:
Thirsty little albino penises: http://www.ironhymen.com/
Oh my god, that site had me in tears from laughing so hard. Thanks [Big Grin]
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
Isn't a statue of "The Ten Commandments" a graven image?

KE
 
Posted by kenmeer livermaile (Member # 2243) on :
 
"Isn't a statue of "The Ten Commandments" a graven image?"

Lo! A graven image!

Let's call him Bob...
 
Posted by kenmeer livermaile (Member # 2243) on :
 
Living in a Strange World:

SAW

in which people carefully scrutinize the various psychological effects that a movie about psychological horror might have on others, especially kids.

Rating the psychological horror of a psychologically horrifying movie about psychological horror.
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
KL, I should have said you can find a saving grace in almost anything. [Wink]

KE
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
I just finished the new book "Decipher". It started out really good, but drug toward the middle, and by the end I was just ready to get it over with. I never got to really care about the characters.

KE
 
Posted by cperry (Member # 1938) on :
 
KE - Depends! That's a good one.

I know what you mean about that book. Finally, after years of finishing books I really didn't care about, I learned to just say NO! and put it down if I really wasn't interested.

Now, if only I could do that with chocolate.
 
Posted by kenmeer livermaile (Member # 2243) on :
 
cperry:

Evolution proceeds through mutation:

"I'm blind!," eye bald.
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
Robert Blake aquitted!? Just goes to show that if you are rich and famous in America then you can get away with murder. I loved "Baretta" but damn!

Do the crime and you won't do the time.

KE

[ March 16, 2005, 07:26 PM: Message edited by: KnightEnder ]
 
Posted by A. Alzabo (Member # 1197) on :
 
quote:
Robert Blake aquitted!? Just goes to show that if you are rich and famous in America then you can get away with murder. I loved "Baretta" but damn!

And that's the name of that tune!
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
Paladine is hacking on me and my inablility to use the correct too/to in writing. I've asked for help, but none has been forthcoming so far.

I'll make an admission. There is a gap in my education and subsequent knowledge. In fact, I still have to think about the order of the months. I think it is because I went to five different elementary schools in five years. I think that in one school they taught the order of the months and how to write too/to correctly in first grade, and in another school they taught it in second grade. Unfortunately, I was at the school that taught it in second grade when I was in first grade, and when I transferred to the next school, everybody assumed anybody in the second grade already new it. I faked my way through years of school on things like that.

KE
 
Posted by A. Alzabo (Member # 1197) on :
 
quote:
Paladine is hacking on me and my inablility to use the correct too/to in writing. I've asked for help, but none has been forthcoming so far.

Two -- you seem to have that one down.
To -- motion (literal and figurative) towards
something. Initializes an infinitive.
Too -- Also, excessive. Much rarer than "to", so
if you always write "to", you'll cut down
on usage errors. Or you can substitute
"also" for most casess and not
have to worry about it.
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
Thanks AA.

KE
 
Posted by simplybiological (Member # 1344) on :
 
KE,
while you're asking, you use possessives/plurals incorrectly a lot, particularly by putting a possessive where none is needed.
To use some of your thread titles...
Are Christian's Theocrats?
Why are American's so fascinated with serial killers?

in these cases, neither Christians or Americans needs an apostrophe... you only need an apostrophe with the s when either you are replacing the word is (so if you were intending to say "christian is theocrats," which you weren't) or when there is ownership, something belongs to somebody.

there's a really funny book called "Eats Shoots and Leaves" about punctuation and grammatical rules that's REALLY well-written, if you're interested. it doesn't read like a grammar book at all.

also, if you have trouble with words like to/too, then/than, etc, there's a book called "When words collide: a media writer's guide to grammar and style" that has a lot of quick references for stuff like that.

also, nothing beats "The Elements of Style," the classic (boring) book on such matters.

i know you like to write, so it might not be a bad idea?
 
Posted by kannan (Member # 2169) on :
 
KE,

One way to distinguish between too/to:
"Too" has one 'o' more than "to". So, when you want to say that something is more than required or expected use "too" . Like : "This is too much". As AA pointed out, it is pretty much 'to' everywhere else.

'to' on the other hand, just has the sense of to-wards (probably was shoretened from that historically...somebody know something about this?)


Kannan
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
It's a great idea. That's the kind of stuff that spell-check can't fix. Thanks, to you all.

KE

[ March 18, 2005, 07:06 PM: Message edited by: KnightEnder ]
 
Posted by simplybiological (Member # 1344) on :
 
in other news...
i have a big brick of dry ice- ideas?

i already poured hot water over a bunch of bits of it and danced around saying, "i'm on venus! i'm on venus!"
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
I really appreciate the help. I have always been the kind of guy that was willing to learn from others.

When I started playing softball I was playing D-ball with my buddies for fun. (The Classifications are D, C, B, A, AA, Major, Open, Super-Open.) I watched the guys that were really good and learned from them. (Fortunately, lots of people want to give you advice in the softball world, too. [Smile] ) I learned from them, and little by little I worked my way up the ladder. Eventually, I was playing Super-Open and teams from all over the country, were sending me contracts, flying me all over the country, and paying me thousands of dollars to play ball.

I've kind of done the same thing here on OA. I have learned different things from a lot of different people, in a lot of different areas, and in that respect I think I have benefitted more from OA than most. So, thanks everyone for all the help and the free education. [Smile]

KE
 
Posted by A. Alzabo (Member # 1197) on :
 
quote:
i have a big brick of dry ice- ideas?

1:1,000,000 scale model of Mount St. Helens?
 
Posted by kenmeer livermaile (Member # 2243) on :
 
"in other news...
i have a big brick of dry ice- ideas?

i already poured hot water over a bunch of bits of it and danced around saying, "i'm on venus! i'm on venus!"

I think this is the most delightful sentence you've written here. A decent idea, too.

When in Boy scouts, we camped by some slow-moving muddy river. Dumped some dry ice in it. It slowly moved downstream, leaving a trail of smoky bubbles popping on the surface. Grey warm cloudy day, dark murky sluggish river.

The effect suggsted a dragon was down there somewhere.

Next, racial stereotype. I am old enough to have seen B&W Amos'n'Andy shows. So these two dark-skinned fellows are downstream fishing. We watched from some bushes. The bubbles came their way. With dignity but not without urgency, they removed themselves from that spot.

Put a little bit of it in your toilet and let the fog accumulate. Flush. A backwards volcano.

Let it finish melting by a houseplant so they get a nice draught of pure CO2. They'll thank you for it, maybe even think of you as Venus.
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
Since we lost our house and are forced to live in apartments with "low-flow" toilets, I can't see anything funny about toilets.

KE
 
Posted by cperry (Member # 1938) on :
 
So, after the Venus dance, what did you end up doing with it, SB?
 
Posted by cperry (Member # 1938) on :
 
Regarding "to," there are many uses of that word that don't indicate direction. Infinitive verb forms, for instance, use "to": I want to eat.

The clue about the spelling, with two Os instead of one, is a good reminder. Like dessert vs. desert. You want more dessert (two Ss).
 
Posted by simplybiological (Member # 1344) on :
 
well, i definitely didn't put in hot water in the bathtub, nor did two of my friends come over explicitly to dance about in the fog and watch my cat try to swat/bite the vapors.


i bought a millipede (see the internet/dog thread)...

this brings the grand total of house lifeforms to 21...

2 humans
1 kitty fantastic
3 leopard geckos
1 bearded dragon
1 crocodile skink
1 ball python
1 taiwanese beauty snake
1 sinaloan milk snake
1 bull snake
1 hognose snake
1 texas garter snake
1 desert rat snake
3 mice
2 beta fish
1 giant african millipede

(note: only kitty, 1 gecko, the fish and millipede are mine...the rest belongs my housemate)
 
Posted by hywer (Member # 2046) on :
 
How do you live with that many animals? Don't they all plot to overthrow the order of things when you leave?

Oh, and... Ugggg. Snakes. *twitch, twitch*
 
Posted by simplybiological (Member # 1344) on :
 
They don't bite hands that feed them (for the most part... my gecko is definitely in the running for least friendly creature on earth).

all but kitty fantastic (and us) live in big aquarium-type set ups, and my roommate has racks for them all... basically, the walls of the front room of the house are lined with reptiles. my gecko and the new pede live in the kitchen on the shelf with the cereal and martini glasses.

it really doesn't bug me. for a while, we had two additional snakes that we were snake-sitting for a couple months, but they're gone... they really don't bug me.

i think if most people hold a snake for a spell they get over it...
 
Posted by kenmeer livermaile (Member # 2243) on :
 
My daughter wants to live with YOU. She's gotta critter fixation.

Has a young python (I forget which kind). It's favorite position is inside her bra, wrapped snugly around her bosomskies, it's little head peeking out of her cleavage. Like she'a an Egyptian goddes or something. (She has an ancient Egypt obsession too.)

Bearded dragon? I hope she never finds out they exists...
 
Posted by cperry (Member # 1938) on :
 
I had a red rat snake once, but it kept pooping on me. Hard to train a snake not to poop on ya. Thank goodness I never put him in my bra.
 
Posted by hywer (Member # 2046) on :
 
Yes, I think if I held a snake for a while, and was forced to be around it, I would get over it. As a kid, I tried to catch snakes, but I couldn't, because slithering confuses my brain, and I just focus on the crest of the slither. Anything else I could catch, but snakes? Nope. So they inherited a little symbol of invincibilty for me, and then fear.

So... add to that the western hertitage of hating rattlers (which I so thankfully inherited from my father [Roll Eyes] ) and Indiana Jones movies as a child, and... well...

You gots more guts than me, sister.

[ March 19, 2005, 09:07 PM: Message edited by: hywer ]
 
Posted by simplybiological (Member # 1344) on :
 
KL,
bearded dragons are great... phoenix gets to run loose in the house when kitty fantastic is sequestered, and he's a sweetheart. big cute desert lizard.

the hognose has a habit of slithering up into sleeves and going to sleep... i have no problem with snakes in my clothing- they actually feel pretty nice, i'm sure your daughter can attest to that.

hywer- i fear all things that could bite me and put me in the hospital. the most poisonous thing we have/will ever have is the hognose, and they barely have any venom.

you should find a tame corn snake in a pet store and give it a whirl- they're lovely.
 
Posted by hywer (Member # 2046) on :
 
If by "lovely" you mean "reptilian" and "serpentine," (edit: and you probably do) yeah, they probably are. [Wink] But I have an out. No pets allowed in my apartment. I really ought to face this fear someday, though...

[ March 20, 2005, 12:00 AM: Message edited by: hywer ]
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
Concerning Memories

The other night I had a very vivid dream of having sex with a women that I've never had sex with in real life. A movie star with whom, unfortunately, I'll never really be able to have sex. However, now that it is over, I remember the sex with her, exactly as I remember actual sex I've had with women in the past. So, for all intents and purposes, I've had sex with that woman. Or, at least the memory I have of having sex with her, is the same to me, as the memory I have of women with whom I've actually had sex. (Or at least my idea of what sex with that women would be like. Close enough for me.)

My point is, that although dreaming of, or imagining doing something, is not the same as actualy performing the act, the memory of the event is the same.

This being the case, if you could train yourself to dream on cue, or imagine in sufficient detail, then you could at least have the memory of having sex with anybody you wanted. I suppose this could work for other things besides sex, too. For example, things like flying, or other things that are realistically impossible for whatever reason. It's just that sex is what I'm most interested in. [Wink]

As far as memory goes, I wish there were a better way of recalling complete situations and events instead of just highlighted bits and pieces. I also wish there was a way of recording (save to disk) all of our memories so they didn't degrade over time.

Of course, as far as the vivid imagining goes, realistic enough virtual reality will eventually render it obsolete and unnecessary. VR will do the job for you. But, even then, all we will have left at the end of the day, will be our memories. [Frown]

KE

[ March 20, 2005, 01:40 AM: Message edited by: KnightEnder ]
 
Posted by kenmeer livermaile (Member # 2243) on :
 
From me shipmate, Long Tom Sylvarrh:

Shortest poem -- Adam had 'em.

Shortest sentence -- "I am."

Longest sentence -- "I do."


Shortest C&W drink myself numb love gone bad song:

"Eve leave."

Like all good C&W songs, it revolved around a pun. In this case, an Eve leaf is a fig leaf.

It could be churned into a longer, non Hyper-Compressed World, normal reality type version with a chorus line sorta like this:

All she left behind were her leaves... crying into his ex's underwear, as it were...
 
Posted by kenmeer livermaile (Member # 2243) on :
 
Because it was a GREAT MOMENT in American pop culture, I remind those of us who remember these lyrics to a great song:

1969
Performer Ray Stevens
Title Guitarzan
Lyrictext

He's free as the breeze
He's always at ease
He lives in the jungle and hangs by his knees
As he swings through the trees
With a trapeze in his B.V.D.s
He's got a union card and he's practicing hard
To play the guitar, gonna be a big star
Yeah, he's gonna go far
And carry moonbeams home in a jar
He ordered Chets guitar course C.O.D.
Likes A and E and hes working on B
Big W&W and R&B and even the chimpanzees agree
That someday soon hell be a celebrity
Get it, get it, get it.

Gitarzan, he's a guitar man
He's all you can stand
Give him a hand, gitarzan

He's got a girl named Jane
With no last name
Kinda homely and plain
But he loves her just the same
Cause she kindles the flame
And it drives him insane
When he hears her sing
She really does her thing
It's her claim to fame
Come on sing one Jane
Baby, baby, oh baby
Baby, oh baby

They've got a pet monkey who likes
To get drunky and sing boogie woogie
And it sounds real funky
Come on your turn boy
Sing one monkey
Lets hear it for the monkey
On Saturday night they need some excitement
Jane gets right and the monkey gets tight
And their voices unite
In the pale moonlight
And it sounds all right

Yeah, it's dynamite, it's out of sight
Lets hear it right now
Baby, baby oh baby
Yeah, shut up baby, I'm trying to sing
Get it, get it, get it
Repeat Chorus

For those who don't know this masterpiece, I tender thee to the gods of MP3...

...it is Sunday. Let us play...
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
I remember that Guitarzan, but how the heck do you remember all the words?

I wish I could remember all the words to "Shotgun Willie" or "Little Willie", two different songs in the same vein or milieu. (I guess Willie is a strange name?)

"Shotgun Willie sits around in his underwear
Biting on a bullet and pulling out all of his hair..."
That's all I remember.

And lil Willie goes...

"Little Willie, Willie won't, go home
But you can't make Willie cause Willie won't go..."

Other honorable mention goofy songs are:

"The Streak" I think that is Ray Perkins? You remember; "Don't look Ethel! But it was too late..."

"Rubber Biscuit" You know,"If it don't bounce back, you go hungry! Bow, bow, bow! Hey-la-a-hey la-ahillabop!"

KE [Smile]

[ March 20, 2005, 02:51 PM: Message edited by: KnightEnder ]
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
Your longest sentence: "I do."

Reminds me of the old joke;

They found the cure for nymphomania.
Wedding Cake.

Or,

Why does a bride smile when she says "I do"? Because she knows she'll never have to give another blow job for the rest of her life.

Speaking of old jokes, I wonder how many people actually know the old limerick "There once was a man from Nantucket"? People allude to it all the time, but nobody ever says the whole thing because it is too vulgar. (Too, is that right? Damn this is hard!) Too vulgar for here, but if anybody doesn't know it and wants to, I'll email them the rest. I think it is quite amusing.

KE

[ March 20, 2005, 02:49 PM: Message edited by: KnightEnder ]
 
Posted by Everard (Member # 104) on :
 
My dad may be the only author of "epic" limericks. He writes four to five stanza limericks for special occassions. I almost died of embarrasment when he launched into one when addressing me at my bar mitzvah
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
Ev,

Now you have to share it with the rest of the forum! And if you can't remember it all, I'm sure your dad would love a call from you asking about it. We dad's love it when our kids are interested in anything we have to say. [Smile]

KE
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
On OSC

I was thinking about OSC the other day and it occurred to me that not only was he prescient enough to invent bloggers before anybody had ever thought of them, but the bloggers he invented posted pretty much the opposite of their true views in order to elicit specific responses from their audience. Maybe that is what OSC is doing? At least it helps me to think so.

KE
 
Posted by Everard (Member # 104) on :
 
3 steps ahead of you, KE. Already asked him for it [Smile] He archives all those poems.
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
As far as books and movies go is there any such thing as a truly unique idea? Is it even possible to come up with something new and unique? Or is there nothing new under the sun?

KE

[ March 20, 2005, 05:01 PM: Message edited by: KnightEnder ]
 
Posted by cperry (Member # 1938) on :
 
Yes, KE, you used "too" correctly. Not so hard after all, no?

And having just reread Ender's Game, I too had the thought of OSC creating bloggers before bloggers came about and wondered if he wasn't actually playing Demosthenes to his own Locke. Funny you just posted that.

As far as originality goes, even Shakespeare started with someone else's ideas.
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
Great minds think alike.

KE
 
Posted by simplybiological (Member # 1344) on :
 
quote:
We dad's love it when our kids are interested in anything we have to say
still with the possessive problem... don't need an apostrophe with "dads."

do you see?
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
Yes, I see. Sorry. Isn't that what they have editors for? Seriously, I appreciate you pointing it out. I hope you noticed that on several occassions recently I have refrained from adding the apostrophe. It was hard. If I ever get money I plan on taking writing classes.

Also SB, we have begun seriously considering moving to Austin. My sister lives there and has just bought a new house. It is a big house and she is single with only 8 dogs. She says we could stay with her until we can find housing etc. Add to that the fact that Stacy is being made manager at Starbucks, and subsequently has to transfer out of the store she works in now. We could be neighbors soon!

KE
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
SNL

Did y'all see the Weekend Update? Tina Fey reports that there is a study that shows Mormon teenagers are better students. She says; "you'd be a good student too if you had 8 moms nagging at you."

Funny. But we should give a shout of congratulations to Mormon parents, of whom I know there are a few on OA. Good job!

KE
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
I'm posting this here in hopes that more people will see it and join.

How many of you have written short stories? Or have writing aspirations?

Perhaps we could help each other? Read each others stories and comment on them? I realize we'd have to be thick skinned, but if you're not, you probably wouldn't be here on OA where it is a necessity.

What I suggest is that we email each other our stories and then we can discuss them here on the board. If you want to participate and have any suggestions I would love to hear them. Email me with your email address if you would like to be a part of the Ornery Writers Workshop.

knightender@google.com
(If you need an email addy I have google ones to give out.)

KE
 
Posted by Locus (Member # 540) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by KnightEnder:
As far as memory goes, I wish there were a better way of recalling complete situations and events instead of just highlighted bits and pieces. I also wish there was a way of recording (save to disk) all of our memories so they didn't degrade over time.

KE

You sincerely wish to be cursed with perfect memory?
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
If I could decide which memories to remember? Absolutely.

KE
 
Posted by Locus (Member # 540) on :
 
Ahh ..to be god without responsibility [Smile]
 
Posted by hywer (Member # 2046) on :
 
KE--hey, why don't you write about that? Memories, I mean, and how to recall them better and what happens to people who do, etc. Even though the idea might have been thought of before, you could definitely develop it into at least a short story. Better yet, what if there are no new ideas--or memories? Used memories, preserved perfectly for recall... why? What's it do? How does it work? Who can afford it? There's a million questions.

[ March 21, 2005, 08:46 PM: Message edited by: hywer ]
 
Posted by kenmeer livermaile (Member # 2243) on :
 
Speaking of memory, that lovely thing:

I saw a new cloud composition last night. This happens once every year or two. It's immediately striking because as soon as one sees it one thinks, "I neveer saw anything like THAT before!"
A huge wash of wonder surges through one. As a baby or young child, we were in this state a lot; almost constantly in our toddler years. Every other minute revealed something we'd never seen before. This is probably why we have so little recollection of those early years? Because one mostly remembers something by encountering it again and recongnizing it, thinking, 'I remember that'?

Similarly, I think the core of the Zen 'nomind' thrill of enlightenment stems from disconnecting the catalogue of memory checks so that one sees the same old same old with the same freshness as a child. Not without recognition; one knows not to touch the fire, but with the ability to see each flame as its own self, and not as a subset of the mnemomic label: "fire".
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
hywer,

I started a short story involving that subject last night. Thanks.

KE
 
Posted by kenmeer livermaile (Member # 2243) on :
 
"I remember that Guitarzan, but how the heck do you remember all the words?"

I don't. Google finds some sight that remembers 'em for me. My homepage on me browser is ALWAYS set to google, the hyperlibrary of Alexandria.

I type guitarzan lyrics and soon I'm there. Likewise, I use google as my dictionary more and more. Learned a trick ysterday. Say you type 'superconductor definition'. (Word-definition is my standard search method for this.) More obscure terms don't always produce good 'dictionary sites. But (example follows):

superconductor definition

Looky here:

Tip: Click to get a definition of: superconductor
Or just click on the underlined words in the above colored bar

This is opn the left just below the title line. Over on the right and just above you'll see:

Results 1 - 10 of about 65,100 for superconductor definition. (0.41 seconds)

The search terms, superconductor definition, will be blue-highlighted as hypertext. Click 'em and you get:

Technology
superconductor

A material that has little resistance to the flow of electricity. Traditional superconductors operate at -459 Fahrenheit (absolute zero).

Thus far, the major use for superconductors, made of alloys of niobium, is for high-powered magnets in medical imaging machines that use magnetic fields instead of x-rays.

Using experimental materials, such as copper oxides, barium, lanthanum and yttrium, IBM's Zurich research lab in 1986 and the University of Houston in 1987 raised the temperature of superconductivity to -59 degrees Fahrenheit. If superconductors can work at reasonable temperatures, they will have a dramatic impact on the future of computing. See Josephson junction.

WAY cool...
 
Posted by kenmeer livermaile (Member # 2243) on :
 
Knight Ender:

I have a rather fat book containing way too many limericks -- all of them filthy --, most of them circa the 40s. WWII was a high point of low wit.

I will endeavor to share one more or less daily here if you so wish. First I gotta find the dang thing...
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
KL, I look forward to them.

KE
 
Posted by A. Alzabo (Member # 1197) on :
 
quote:
My dad may be the only author of "epic" limericks. He writes four to five stanza limericks for special occassions. I almost died of embarrasment when he launched into one when addressing me at my bar mitzvah
You're not from Nantucket by any chance, Ev? [Eek!]
 
Posted by hywer (Member # 2046) on :
 
KE: [Smile] Good luck!

kenmeer: About looking at the world like a child, when everything's new... I think that it's one of the greatest tragedies of our lives that so many people loose that. It takes time, doesn't it? No one seems willing to sit down for a while and just look at the sky or stare at a mountain range or listen to the wind. Not even our artists do it any more, most of the time, but instead work on technique until they loose sight of why we would even want art.

How do people who live in a city--with the stars dimmed, the wind silenced or contorted, surrounded by unnatural walls--get by? I find myself amazed at the wonder to be had at the marvels that we as humans can produce, but at the expense of the stars, the air, the mountains and the trees? I wonder if the price is too steep. The city's a nice place to visit, but when the night comes, give me a wooded glen.
 
Posted by kenmeer livermaile (Member # 2243) on :
 
"The city's a nice place to visit, but when the night comes, give me a wooded glen."

Hence I hit the wander road at 18 and spent almost ten years lost, lonely, desperate, cold, and just plain messed up, leaving strips of my soul sbagged on barbed-wire fences... but close to the stars, big clouds, wind that smelled like earth, and all the crazy people poverty can buy. IN SPokane, I live on the edge of two worlds. Ten minutes' drive in Tonka takes me into the Palouse. Stars, frogs, the music of the spheres...
 
Posted by A. Alzabo (Member # 1197) on :
 
KE aked this in another thread:
quote:
What's the age limit for joining the Army?


I heard today on the radio that the maximum entrance age for the National Guard and the Army Reserves has been raised from 35 to 39, if you're still interested.
 
Posted by kenmeer livermaile (Member # 2243) on :
 
For KE and kidzmom especially:

Because I'm in a good mood now that my endorphins are really kicked in after falling down the stairs and almost breaking my toe, and because said toe hurts to much for me to rummage 'round and find the Book of Limericks, and because it somehow feels like riday night in the beer gardens of Valhalla, I'll post this:

<begin>
angels, children, dogs, fathers, friends , ghosts & spouses
PART 1

“Death comes as angels to us all. Remember that, Kenmeer, and say your father's name every so often. The dead live so long as someone calls out their name.”
[Adam de Montagne, private letters of correspondence, Dec 1999 ]


I am troubled by angels or I imagine that I am. In the tradition of philosophy, there is a distinction between phenomena (that which is communally apparent) and noumena (that which cannot be verified by the external senses or corroborated by witnesses). In our experience, phenomena can appear to be a subset that is contained by noumena but the reverse can also be supposed. It is from this supposing where arises the confusion.

In the world of phenomena, things come and go. Two things gone were my fathers: Bob West, my biological father and Jimmy Livermaile, my adopted father. Two things come are my children, Todd, Margaret, and Stephan Livermaile. I...am here and always have been to the best of my recollection, which begins at about 2 to 2&1/2 years.

How present and annoying are the ghosts of phenomena! My children are seemingly always nearby, to the point where my wife and I have come to believe that ‘coitus interruptus‘ are inseparable terms. My children, my dogs, my wife, myself, are inevitably physical and unquestionable presences. In bumbling down the stairs at night towards the potty, I usually step on our younger dog, Maya, who prefers to sleep at hallway intersections. (Maya, the Hindu term meaning ‘veil of illusion’ is an old Sanskrit word that literally means ‘dance of mud’. Life breathed into clay and all that.) Maya, apparently roused not so much by being stepped on but by the sound of the toilet flushing, usually decides to lap toilet water about the time I’ve returned to bed and regained snuggle posture with my spouse. This noise, of a large labrador/collie mixed breed dog of unsubtle personality paddling toilet water into her gullet with acrobatic tongue flailing, destroys my wife’s slumber. Notwithstanding the proved uselessness of yelling at a less than bright animal whose ears are hidden in a ceramic echo chamber imitating high tide in the midnight dark, my wife still finds it emotionally meaningful to menacingly whisper-shout Maya’s name, over & over, until Maya finally stops splashing in the commode and, suddenly hearing her name, comes puppy-fumbling up the stairs to put her nose in my face. (Our dogs love me and usually come to me no matter who’s calling.)

Sleep soon returns. For me this usually requires heavy snoring. My spouse, hating snoring perhaps even more than toilet slurps, calls my name sharply a few times, then usually gives me an elbow to ponder. I turn over to a no-snore position. Given my terrible dietary habits and tendency to stuff my face before bedtime, rolling over usually involves a certain amount of jet assistance. This incites a slight tussle over blanket rights as both of us struggle to pull the sheets tight around our neck before the gas can breach our nostrils.

My daughter often talks in her sleep. Just thought I’d throw that in...

Stephan has trouble waking up to go to the bathroom, so bed-wetting is a frequent problem. Perhaps it is exacerbated by the sound of tongue/toilet turbulence. All too often he wakes up wet and no longer warm; the only warm refuge is Mom & Daddy’s bed. I set the alarm for an early AM ring so I can wake him up for more toilet work. Either way, bedwet or beepalarm, I am again awakened for reasons toiletary.

And I frequently have night nosebleeds, and we live next to doctors’ offices where the night janitor announces his 1 AM arrival with the slamming of various doors; and still some people wonder why we coffeeholics worship the smell of coffee at dawn...

Phenomena. We smell, we slurp, we snore, we sweat, we snuggle, we shiver, we sigh, we stumble, we lift the lid on the toilet seat, we lower the lid on the toilet seat, we enter the throne room just after another has finished and wonder how they can stand it!... while we ourselves do even worse violence to the morning aroma. Another reason to worship the smell of coffee at dawn: “Coffee: Brown Stuff that smells GOOD!” (From Folger’s advertisement ‘out takes’ collection, “Commercials That Didn’t Make It Out Of The Can”, now available on video in my imagination.)

Peter Freuchen was an Arctic explorer who lived much of his life with Eskimos. He describes how, after a big night of singing and seance in the clan’s lodge-sized igloo, morning was an incredible cacophony of phlegm adjustments, belches, flatulence, various turns at the chamber pot... all in decidedly cozy quarters. No, I am not overly fascinated by gross bodily functions (well, at least not so much as is my six-year old boy). But I am enamored of the minute daily annoyances and absurdities which tell and remind us that we are, indeed, here. And our loved ones as well.

Jimmy smoked through all my childhood. He fought fires and wrassled heavy household appliances up tenement stairs. He smelled when he came home. His snoring was like a sonar beacon that helped one navigate blind through the house at night. He put greasy kid stuff in his hair. He loved coffee, and I knew when he was home and/or awake by the sound and smell of his electric percolator, a machine whose sounds and smells echoed the morning shuffle’s snorts and toilet flushes – but in a NICE way. Ah, coffee...

And the smoke gathered around him in the evening as he sat on his big soft TV chair. It never bothered me; ours was a drafty house so the smoke didn’t linger much, just enough to look cool and spooky swirling in the updraft above the lamplight of his chair-side end table.

This is not to neglect more refined phenomena. Eyes, voices, expressions... people can become terrifically personable when you experience them in physical form. Combine smile with laughter with squint-eyed tears, and the physical persona fair transcends itself. (Jimmy couldn’t resist Laurel & Hardy and never failed to lose it amid the tie-twiddling and hat-bashing, laughing until he’d cry.) Evanescence dominates as moods flash and flicker, attentions wander, meanings develop and deposit ever deeper over the years in the form of one another... but at night, no matter what, there’s the reassuring snore, the grind of teeth, the piddle of dogpaddling tongues, the smell of our fellows, the warmth of each other’s bodies... Such is phenomena, and so are people.

Noumena and angels are different, uh, phenomena. They’re not nearly so dense. Imagination can blow through them like wind through smoke. Whim so changes their shape that their appearance is sometimes kaleidoscopic. Their reality is open to doubt and dismissal. Nonetheless, they stay around. Ancestor worship is the oldest known religion.

Attempting to segue from the physically familiar to the psychically displayed is an awkward passage here. ‘Here’ is a largely noumenal realm, the virtual reality created by these words of expression before your eyes. In the phenomenal realm, where the rubber meets the road, it is enormously difficult to undergo such transitions. At my Father’s funeral, a great group of persons including myself experienced inescapable troubles: strange things called grief, regret, remorse, loneliness, sheer overwhelming bewilderment... these inexplicable entities wafted through the crowd and our bodies like so many demonic spirits pulling our strings. Despite it’s tendency to win Academy Award nominations, the physical expressions of grief are not pretty. We do not usually care to share our expulsions of grief with others, although interestingly, a child’s tears or a spouse/lover/likely-prospect-for-a-one-night-stand’s tears evoke deliciously tender feelings and, in the case of spouses et cetera, powerful aphrodisia. Fortunately, tears are relatively odorless. Not only are a child’s slobber-goo snuffles or a lover’s whimper-squeezed noserun-tears not disgusting, they positively glow. Like a frame-mounted kidney stone, they are physical proof of pain successfully passed through these weird phenomena we ride or inhabit or are: our physical selves.

Do the above paragraphs read awkwardly? Do they seem to meander about, unable to locate or perhaps avoiding the point they’re supposed to make? Aye, they do, and so do we, gentlepeoples. The roars of outraged grief which any waking day of life on earth deserve are not proclamations we undertake easily. Our rage at the obscene injustice of it all in the world at large, and our deep wells of sadness at the accumulations of loss and fear which steadily drip into our daily lives, are not those feelings we feature. Perhaps that way madness lies, or death awaits, or... anyway, whatever does lie that way, we normally seek comfort, quietude and -- increasingly, worrisomely to me – distraction, as our preferred states and expressions. Mix in a few cheap thrills if you’re yet under 40.

This is not a thing through which we pass lightly; it is life, it is a phenomenal noumena and a noumenal phenomena and, above and below and through and around it, is also something like a spiritual hallucination. Aye, we talk to ghosts. Most of us, maybe all of us. The dear departed, the enemy absent, God, the Devil.

The segue is complete. We are now thoroughly in our noumena. Ghosts among ghosts. (Tibetan Buddhists refer to human beings as ‘hungry ghosts’.) If you would all join aetherial hands together and place your tootsies on this here Twister/Ouija board, please... Relax, folks; we are not going to do anything here we don’t do every day of our waking damn lives; but we’re gonna do it together now, wherever and whenever now is for you. No need to light candles nor turn down the lights nor look in a mirror in the dark nor any of a number of noumenal lenses conventionally prescribed for focusing and enhancing the imagination and whatever else may exist at the divide between Phenomena & Noumena, the real and the imagined, the living and the dead, the known and the unknown. For me, at this particular moment, what exists in this divide, or curtain rod of The Veil, is my heart, and it’s very full right now and I ain’t sure why, but I’m having a hard time seeing the keypad and saltwater is not only corrosive but a notorious conductor of short-circuiting electricity, so this will be all for now...

angels, children, dogs, fathers, friends , ghosts & spouses
PART 2

“If I were to come back to life, would you still remember me?”
[Casper, The Friendly Ghost]


To the best of my knowledge, tears are still an unexplained mystery. Why leak water from the eyes during moments of emotional extremis? Not everything has its reason. Some things are just effects. The fact that we distill powerful emotions into salty tears may well be only a superfluous side effect of chemical interactions in our limbic system. Stray voltage in our emotional wiring. Whatever the truth may be (and I beg you to consider the strangeness of such an expression: ‘truth may be’), it is poetically satisfying to call tears ‘soul fluid’. However inexplicable and superfluous they may be, tears are vital inessentials. A child who never cried would be considered mentally deranged, and most of us would confirm this diagnosis, just as we deem a child who doesn’t laugh to be a sorely troubled individual.

A similar diagnosis befalls one who doesn’t talk to angels, for conversation with noumena is healthy for the soul. Children seek out imaginary friends in lieu of lost loved ones or available friends. This diagnosis is less commonly expressed or observed; in fact, people often express its opposite: talking to angels invites ridicule. It used to bother me when people caught me chatting with myself or invisible beings. Their inevitable crackpot comments were more annoying by their predictability than insulting by their intent, but either way they are rude: rude both to myself and to whatever reflective, invisible, imaginary, spectral, spiritual, formerly living or yet to manifest beings I might be talking to at the time.

Nevertheless, the diagnosis is true: folks who DON’T talk to the departed or dead or imagined or desired are either frightfully insane or so horribly sane as to make insanity seem preferable. (We institutionalize lunatics; we crucify overtly sane folk.) You and I, or at least I, are neither sane nor insane but merely more or less normal. I do not believe this is our fault. We were raised that way.

Whatever the state of one’s personal mental health, conversing with those not physically present can only improve it, say I. Beginning with a nodding acquaintance with one’s mirror, continuing on to earnest sessions in one’s vehicle (which affords greater privacy) or afoot the pavement (which generally affords a livelier discourse between one’s selves), extending to imaginary asides and consultations with the spirits of absent friends or dead relatives or deceased figures of history, such dialogue is generally considered beneficial unless it becomes a group shouting match or one confuses talking to oneself with talking to Napoleon or Sidhartha or J. Edgar Hoover.

None of this is to prove or disprove the existence of genuine ghosts or angels. The word, genuine, deserves quotation marks in this context but I could not bring myself to do so; it would be too much like placing a sheet over my head and pretending to be only quasi-present. I don’t know about you, but the ghosts to whom I address my remarks are generally as real as I can make them.

This is, rather, to validate such conversations. If one can speculate upon the aether, the veil, the beyond, the dear departed and the hated good-riddanced, one can surely attempt communication with those beyond our common reach. While some prefer strange artifacts through which to contact the unknown, I find a simple hello works well for me. The shaking of hands has become a less meaningful ritual of formal greeting than it was before, but it has never been a mere trite courtesy in greetings between beings of phenomena and beings of noumena. To shake a hand’s ghost is to bestow and receive a great honor. In the movie, “Wings Of Desire”, Peter Falk plays a deliberately fallen angel – not to duh devil but merely to earth – who greets and shakes the hand of a still heavenly angel whom he, being now mortal, can no longer see but can yet sense. “Compagnaro”, says Peter Falk, grasping the air before him in an earnest handclasp, “I can’t tell you how great it is to be here. The taste of the day’s first cuppa coffee, the smell of rain in the wind... and this” (rubbing his hands together) “the way it warms your hands.” To be able to touch oneself! (and, per my sentimental normality, I find my eyes tearing at this mostly overlooked but most dear of all friendships: me and my shadow. To have a body. In my childhood religion, it is taught that we are former angels or such who came to earth to experience fleshly existence on the surface of planetary reality. Supposedly we were willing to suffer great torments as physical beings so long as we were, indeed, physical. And so we often do, as well as receive tremendous pleasures and radiate a sharable ebullience...)

If nothing else, tears are human. If nothing else, so are we. We are at least something or, according to the ‘spirits made flesh’ view, we are something at most and abstract at least. This something that we are may well be only a shared hallucination; the world in which we live doesn’t bear minute scrutiny well. The closer within we peer at the substance of reality, the less it contains and the more it moves. Matter reveals itself to be far less stuffy and much more flighty than it commonly appears to beings like us.

“To the unaided eye”, this is a very physical place, and so it is. But not nearly so physical as it seems. Of all the mysteries of science, one of the greatest is the most common: mass. No one knows what mass is. We only know what it does: it bumps into things, it carries, imparts and receives energy, which is the mirror mystery of mass. The two, matter and energy, are reputed to be totally mutually transmutable; one might say they are inseparably separable. They are also immortal, being indestructible. They can be changed from one to the other, but nothing is lost in the process. (Of course, losing ‘nothing’ might be trickier than thought; you can’t lose what you never had.)

But they can lose meaning. They are noumenally vulnerable. The notion of entropy is the notion of teleology made flesh. The most currently popular view of the cosmos states that all matter/energy has already been created in one vast letting of light, and that energy/matter are steadily transmuting back and forth between each other until someday all will be too tired to change anymore, at which point the cosmos will be so much stuff lying around doing naught. Matter longing for an animate spirit. Dead meat.

I don’t know if inanimate matter longs for a teleological animus anymore than I know if there are forms of ‘spiritual consciousness’ longing for a hunk of inanimate matter to animate. I will say that it’s interesting how the surface of the earth is steadily digested, deposited, digested, deposited, over and over, by living organisms through the aeons. This thought affords a fresh view on a bit of bathroom graffiti popular in the 60s & 70s: “Sartre said to Be is to Do; Nietzche said to Do is to Be; Sinatra said dobedobedo...”

I forget who preferred be’s over do’s or vice versa. Maybe it was not Nietzche but Descartes, or Rimbaud, or Tony Bennet. No matter; either way, one flushes the commode when it’s over, and the living world turns over once more. And here I am, once again, up early before dawn, straining over the chamber pot of corporeal existence, passing matter and thought alike through the keypad. (Yes, those electrons coursing through the internet backbones have mass, too. They’re decidedly material.) Some may think it sophomoric of me to dwell on the poopeedoodee dew of existence; and I must agree, per the formal definition of sophomoric: ‘wisely foolish’. It is never false to ponder one’s roots, and certainly healthy to do so with a smile. As physical beings, or possibly spiritual beings having a physical experience, it is not falsely sentimental to pay tribute to yesterday’s existence via the morning’s bowel movement. It is only fitting burial. Living organisms died so that we may live, and we moderns consume the remnants of their existence with no more ceremony than an unwrapping of polywrap and, if we’re traditionally religious Christians, an offering of thanks to the Creator -- but rarely a note of gratitude to the victims.

(Huckleberry Finn described it best: “The widow rang a bell for supper, and you had to come to time. When you got to the table you couldn’t go right to eating, but you had to wait for the widow to tuck down her head and grumble a little over the victuals, though there warn’t really anything the matter with them – that is, nothing only everything was cooked by itself. In a barrel of odds and ends it is different; things get mixed up, and the juice kinds of swaps around, and the things go better.” Same here. I could have been a hermit; the culture at large surely repelled me and I desired escape, but I could never fully retreat from the world. As dismal as modern culture may seem, I prefer it to ‘cooking by itself’. In a culture, the ‘juice kind of swaps around, and things go better’. Being a thing myself, I think I know whereof I speak.)

We are the dancing mud. From the fertile clay we arose, and to the clay we return, o compagnaros. I do not subscribe to the reigning cosmogony. The product of a largely male fraternity, I believe that ‘Big Bang’ cosmology owes much to boys’ delight in making things go boom. I prefer a cosmology wherein the universe comes and goes a little at a time. In my favorite theory, the universe arises piecemeal from fluctuations in a sub-quantum aether, bit by bit, gradually emerging from under the quantum rug like dust, formerly swept beneath, returning to claim its rightful dance in the sunbeams...

The tragic cliche’ of ghosts or angels is their inability or forbiddance to interact with beings like us. Being us or, at least, beings like us, we think this tragic. So do I, for not only do I think there might well be no one else for ghosts and angels to talk to besides us, I have also duly noticed that, other than beings like us, there seems to be no one else for us to talk to. And I grow lonely, if only for former beings like us who are no longer beings like us but who might yet be – not like us – but close enough for comfort.

I talk to ghosts and angels and even gods. I have also been known to address inanimate matter. Here before the fireplace cinder screen, warming my typing fingers before the crackling static of glowing electrons, I talk to ghosts abroad anon via the Internet. Digital ghosts: physical beings made noumenal, with only the phenomena of text to substantiate their existences. It’s a nicely flexible realm, a pot-bellied stove-side gathering wherein it is just as feasible to whittle cigarettes and smoke sticks as it is to shake hands with ancestors or share a cuppa joe with beings far away in space and time. Rub your hands together and feel their warmth, then place your hands upon the screen before you. Ah, compagnaros, I can’t tell you how great it is to be here...
<end>
 
Posted by javelin (Member # 1284) on :
 
Hey Kenmeer - put the toilet seat down - stops the dog from drinking toilet water [Wink]
 
Posted by kenmeer livermaile (Member # 2243) on :
 
"Hey Kenmeer - put the toilet seat down - stops the dog from drinking toilet water [Wink]"

You assume I was the last to use the toilet?

I pasted 3x5s by all major light switches in our house. They said:

LIGHTS ON -- LIGHTS OFF.

Only made the matter worse. My duties as household servant include the opposite of lamplighter.

I'll be danged if I'll add toilet lidding to that list. Maya's older now and rarely drinks at night. Besides, my snoring has grown so much worse, owing to my HHT (hereditary hemorrhagic talengiectsia), that my wife doesn't notice mere toilet-slurping these days.
 
Posted by javelin (Member # 1284) on :
 
I hear that pressing a pillow down on someone's face for about ten minutes is a sure fire way to take care of snoring problems - what do you think, Kenmeer? Your wife doesn't read over your shoulder, does she? [Wink]
 
Posted by kenmeer livermaile (Member # 2243) on :
 
Nah, she just makes me sleep on the couch.

My revenge: our wee adorable dachshund, Scooter, abandons her embrace and comes down to snuggle with me. I think he LIKES my snoring.

Besides, she doesn't want to deal with putting the pillow down AND having to lift it off later, and with me gone, who would do this?
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
KL,

I haven't had time to read it but I will, thanks.

KE
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
Does anyone know the name or term for the organisms that live in our bodies but are beneficial to us? Not parasites, they are symbiots, but there is a medical term for them, and that is what I'm looking for.

KE
 
Posted by javelin (Member # 1284) on :
 
Are you sure you don't mean symbiots?

Found this definition - symbiosis (mutually beneficial interaction)

[ March 23, 2005, 06:22 PM: Message edited by: javelin ]
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
Javelin,

That is the term, but I think there is another specific term for these organisms. I bet if there is SB will know.

M2,

I remember reading on one of the threads the other day that OSC was posting on Hatrack. Is that true? And if so, why would he post there but not here? Just curious.

KE
 
Posted by Locus (Member # 540) on :
 
What are you looking for KE? Mutualist is a term ..symbiont ..? Are you thinking of a specific organism or a blanket term?
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
I think it is a blanket term. I'll try to clarify tomorrow.

Concerning OWW. I want to point out that I am merely administrating the story distribution process. Anybody and everybody is welcome and encouraged to join regardless of any differences of opinion I might have with them elsewhere. OWW is completely seperate from any of that, and everyone will be treated equally by me.

KE
 
Posted by The Drake (Member # 2128) on :
 
I'm going to dump this thought in here at random to get beyond it.

[vent] Could people please use descriptive titles for the postings? I don't know how many times I revisit a thread I have no interest in, because the title is "You're never gonna believe this".[/vent]
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
I know what you mean Drake. I also wish we could change the title of a thread once the thread changes. I can't remember what the original title of a thread was, but it was something I was interested in and I kept going back to check it only to remember that it had turned into three pages of gun control arguments.

Hey, didn't you just start a thread titled something like "Now this is just stupid"? The spam thread? I liked it, and I posted, but isn't that what you are speaking out against? Either way, I agree with you that we should try to be more descriptive in our titles.

KE
 
Posted by javelin (Member # 1284) on :
 
KE - "A Unique Idea?"
Drake - "Now this is just sad"

[Roll Eyes] [Big Grin]
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
My thread was about the search for a Unique idea. So what is your point. [Razz]

And I never claimed to be perfect. [Cool] I'm sure I have posted thread titles that are not as clear as they could be, but never misleading on purpose. And I would wager that most of my threads have been pretty explicite. [Razz]

Badgering the witness! I already pointed out Drake's failure to do as he asked. [Frown]

Of course he doesn't have to be perfect to wish he and the rest of us were. What Would Jesus Post? [Smile]

[ March 24, 2005, 02:18 PM: Message edited by: KnightEnder ]
 
Posted by The Drake (Member # 2128) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by javelin:
KE - "A Unique Idea?"
Drake - "Now this is just sad"

[Roll Eyes] [Big Grin]

Ha, ha! Yeah, you got me!

edit: It didn't read the same in my head [Smile]

[ March 24, 2005, 02:18 PM: Message edited by: The Drake ]
 
Posted by javelin (Member # 1284) on :
 
I really was just kidding. I was totally shocked to find those two on the main page, without any searching, and HAD to post them [Smile]
 
Posted by The Drake (Member # 2128) on :
 
I love the fact that I just ranted at myself. It's classic, like the guy who bitches about bad drivers as he cuts somebody off.

Badger away [Smile]
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
I know. I hope I didn't come of as snappish, that is why I used the emoticons. [Smile]

KE
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
One of the things I hate is hypocrisy. Another is people with the inability to see any other side of the argument but their own.

Because of this I end up, after awhile,getting fed up with people who have either of those faults, especially when they are compounded by others.

Inevitably the person I call on this says "you are the one that can't ever be objective". This is akin to a cheating husband accusing his wife of being unfaithful. He figures if he is doing it everybody must.

This has happened a couple of times and the first time I went back through past posts of mine, cutting, copying, and pasting quotes where I spoke out against my side of the idealogical spectrum and/or where I had praised conservatives, Christians, George W. Bush, and others that I am usually at odds with.

So, what I'm thinking is we/I need to come up with a way to simply "play" the "proof of objectivity post" without haveing to tie up pages of a thread, or start a new thread.

I wish there was a way that I could post things like this objectivity post, never intentionally lying post, etc. So that when I get into an argument with one of these people I can make the appropriate claim and be backed up as the forum has already stipulated to this fact.

And by no means am I claiming that I am always objective, nor that I am in anyway perfect. But I am not a hypocrite, and I "try" to see the other side of the argument. If we don't, the forum is really a waste of time, neh?

Also, if I did ask for and get such stipulations I would be locking myself into "never" being hypocritical, lying, etc. Because I would be called on it immediately due to the stipulation clause. I am willing to do so. That is how much I am willing to stand by my stated beliefs.

Venting over.

KE

[ March 24, 2005, 02:45 PM: Message edited by: KnightEnder ]
 
Posted by OrneryMod (Member # 977) on :
 
If the person who started a thread would like for it to be renamed, I would be willing to edit the thread title. Just contact me and give me a little time.

OrneryMod
 
Posted by javelin (Member # 1284) on :
 
Hey, KE - aren't all the thread archived or something? Maybe you can pull together a collection of your stuff, throw it into one thread, have OrneryMod archive it, and then link to it ad nausem?
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
OM, Great! I think that would help.

javelin,

Thanks that is a good idea. I don't know if the post I made is still there, it was a while ago, but I think I have the quotes saved in my computer. If it ever comes up again, God forbid, I will do as you suggest.

KE
 
Posted by The Drake (Member # 2128) on :
 
Thanks OM!

I'll leave my mistake there until it dies a natural death. And something tells me that it will be a while before I do it again....
 
Posted by javelin (Member # 1284) on :
 
We need this thing to pop over to a new page so my scrolling finger can have a rest... [Wink]
 
Posted by The Drake (Member # 2128) on :
 
You must Learn the Power of the END key.
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
Or put the arrow just above the arrow on the scroll bar on the right side of the page and hold down the button. It slides faster.

OrneryCon4

Concerning events like OrneryCon. If I ever get famous like OSC I will attend as many of these as I can. Not just to bask in the admiration of my fans, I'm sure OSC is above that even if I'm not, but because I will remember how great it would be for me to meet someone I admire so much.

Which brings up the question who do you admire so much you would like to actually meet them? Famous people of talent, not great people. We would end up with lists full of Ghandi, Jesus Christs, David, Moses, Mohammed, and MLK.

I would like to meet in no particular order: John Wayne, John Lenon, Paul McCartney, and OSC. Obviously I will have to wait to meet the first two on my list. There are some other famous people that I think would be fun to hang out with, but these are the only people I can think of that I would be in awe of.

How about you?

KE

[ March 24, 2005, 07:22 PM: Message edited by: KnightEnder ]
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
Whoa! The End key works way better! Disregard my previous advice. Thanks Drake.

My advice does work best if you are writing a long post and want to jet to the top or bottom. Click on the gray scroll bar as close to the arrow at the top or bottom, wich ever way you want to go. The End key doesn't work in the post box.

KE

[ March 24, 2005, 07:23 PM: Message edited by: KnightEnder ]
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
Has anyone counted how many posts fit on a page? I guess it is a matter of the size of the individual posts?

There should be a name for the post that is lucky enough to occupy the first box at the top of a new page. That post gets read everytime someone clicks on that thread until the page rolls over. Sometimes that is good and sometimes not, but it should have a name. Something like "Alpha Post", which would make the last post the "Omega Post". Not good because that post gets skipped by a lot of people due to the fact that it isn't usually on the most current page long. Do any of you remember "Sniglets"?

Damn, this post is going to end up being the Omega Post!

KE

[ March 24, 2005, 07:30 PM: Message edited by: KnightEnder ]
 
Posted by cperry (Member # 1938) on :
 
KE - I thought you were an athiest. When/how are you going to meet Lennon and Wayne?
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
I can hope I'm wrong can't I? [Smile] I want there to be a reason we are here, I want life to have meaning, I want to believe, I just can't.

Man I love that End button thing. [Big Grin]

KE
 
Posted by kenmeer livermaile (Member # 2243) on :
 
"I can hope I'm wrong can't I? [Smile] I want there to be a reason we are here, I want life to have meaning, I want to believe, I just can't."

The reason we're here is to wonder why we're here. We're application research specialists. God designs; we find a use for it?
 
Posted by kenmeer livermaile (Member # 2243) on :
 
Invasion of the Limerickians

Said Einstein, "I have an equation
Which science might call Rabelaision.
Let P be virginity
Approaching infinity,
And U be a constant persuasion.
"Now if P over U be inverted
And the square root of U be inserted
X times over P,
The result, Q.E.D.
Is a relative," Einstein asserted.
 
Posted by kenmeer livermaile (Member # 2243) on :
 
Nuns With Guns

There was an old abbess quite shocked
To find nuns where the candles were locked.
Said the abbess, "You nuns
Should behave more like guns,
And never go off till you're cocked."

[ March 25, 2005, 12:57 AM: Message edited by: kenmeer livermaile ]
 
Posted by kenmeer livermaile (Member # 2243) on :
 
The Incubus of tesla

While ****ing one night, Dr. Zuck
His wife's nipples in his ears stuck.
Then, his thumb up her bum,
He could hear himself come,
Thus inventing the Radio ****.

Then on further exoperiment bent,
An improvement h thought he'd invent:
With his prick as conductor,
Combed her bush while he ****ed her,
And his balls shot off sparks as he spent.

None of these limericks are 'decent', so further sharings will probably have to occur offboard.

[ March 25, 2005, 12:59 AM: Message edited by: kenmeer livermaile ]
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
quote:
The reason we're here is to wonder why we're here.
Then I'm working perfectly.

Bingo! Yahzee! Alpha Post!


KE

[ March 25, 2005, 05:20 AM: Message edited by: KnightEnder ]
 
Posted by cperry (Member # 1938) on :
 
Well, KE, it appears you and I share some qualities. I can see EVERY reason to doubt; I just choose to believe for 2 reasons: 1) I can't believe this is all an accident, and I think I'd go mad if I did; 2) I'd rather err on the hopeful side, if I have to err.

Most Christians would probably not call me a Christian. I call myself a Christian because I was raised that way and it's the way I choose to practice my spirituality. But I believe that I could have easily been a Jew or a Muslim -- it's an accident of birth. And I can't bring myself to believe in a God who would send good people to hell just because they were raised in a place where they never heard of Jesus (or were raised to think of Jesus as something bad). In fact, I have a real hard time believing in hell at all.

The Christian Bible says people were created in the image of God. I think we are each creating God in OUR image; if there is a God, he/she/it is much more than our puny minds can comprehend.
 
Posted by Locus (Member # 540) on :
 
KE,

You have any idea what would happen to OrneryCon if OSC did show up there with any regularity?


Aside from the fact it would effectively kill the meeting it's really exhausting being around a crowd who watches you like you're some divine messenger.
 
Posted by Slander Monkey (Member # 1999) on :
 
Despite what the mice might tell us to the contrary, the answer is 40.

[ March 25, 2005, 12:49 PM: Message edited by: Slander Monkey ]
 
Posted by javelin (Member # 1284) on :
 
Clearly, you are reading the wrong "text" book, Mr. Monkey.
 
Posted by kenmeer livermaile (Member # 2243) on :
 
Javelin's right. We';re critiquing hopefully Shakesperian output of a roomfull of typewriting monkeys. So far, no luck, just some dribble about hitchhiking around the galaxy...
 
Posted by The Drake (Member # 2128) on :
 
There are now 12 alpha-posts in the "World without israel" thread. Perhaps a tournament of champions is needed...
 
Posted by javelin (Member # 1284) on :
 
If KL and Dey didn't use up entire pages on their own, then perhaps the overall length of that thread would be shorter. The lengths of the posts would be easier to accept if everyone wasn't talking right past each other on that thread. [Roll Eyes]
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
I thought the answer was 42?

KE
 
Posted by cperry (Member # 1938) on :
 
Okay, I missed the question. What is the answer, either 40 or 42, to?
 
Posted by kidzmom (Member # 2015) on :
 
KE: on the whole matter of meeting (well-known) people you admire--I've been fortunate to meet the author Sherrilyn Kenyon (aka Kinley MacGregor), and I wanna be like her when I grow up!! Unfortunately, she's several years younger than me... [Roll Eyes] Anyway, she started off writing SF (with some romance), and now writes paranormal romance and historicals, and she's the most accessible published author I've ever met (and I've met several). She reads and posts on her bbs all the time, has on-line chats with her readers usually once a month (sometimes more), and meets with her fans whenever possible. I'm going to get to see her next weekend in Dallas, as she's to be the keynote speaker for a weekend writer's conference I'm attending. I may even get to go out to dinner with her (and several other folks). I think she's an incredibly talented, creative writer, and I'd probably read her stuff even if she wasn't so nice, but it sure puts the icing on the cake!

As for who else I'd like to meet--well, Shakespeare, without a doubt. Also, I'd like to meet some of my ancestors, like Ian MacDonald (12th chief of Glencoe), Jonathan Swift, and Robert E. Lee (they're scattered around my mom's family tree, along with plenty of fine, but unknown, folks). I'd love to meet Queen Boudiccea, and Elizabeth I, and Christina Rosetti. As far as live people go, hmm...that's tough! I'm still thinking...

Ken--once more, you leave me speechless [Eek!] .
On the matter of benefical organisms--are you thinking of beneficial flora and fauna? That's what I've heard the scientific set call the "helpful" bacteria and microorganisms on and in us.
 
Posted by kidzmom (Member # 2015) on :
 
Yep, it's 42! (and don't forget your towel [Wink] )

(cperry--it's a reference from Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy).

[ March 25, 2005, 05:23 PM: Message edited by: kidzmom ]
 
Posted by javelin (Member # 1284) on :
 
Life, the universe, and everything
 
Posted by javelin (Member # 1284) on :
 
I want to meet your ancestors, too, kidzmom! [Smile]
 
Posted by kidzmom (Member # 2015) on :
 
javelin--oops, my bad--it's been a couple of decades since I actually read it! [Razz] (BTW, this emoticon always makes me think of those books)

If I ever figure out how to meet'em, I'll take you along, jav!
 
Posted by cperry (Member # 1938) on :
 
Thanks, KE. Let's see, I must have been in middle school when I read those, so ... 25 years later, I don't remember any of them! Must revisit, hmmm?
 
Posted by kenmeer livermaile (Member # 2243) on :
 
Speechless? Does that mean you won't talk dirty to me in my sleep any more?
 
Posted by javelin (Member # 1284) on :
 
Dreams are dreams, KL - you can dream she talks dirty to you all you want....
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
kidzmom,

Life, the Universe, and Everything" is in the "Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy" series, so you weren't totally wrong.

cperry,

You definitely should read them again. Stacy got me the leather bound whole series book for my birthday one year, and I like them so much I reread them every 5 years or so.

I love the way we are the third smartest animal on Earth, mice and dolphins being first and second. And how mice are only part of a being, the part that projects into our dimension, and they test us by running the wrong way in mazes and dying for no reason during tests. Douglas Adams was truly unique.

KE

[ March 25, 2005, 06:07 PM: Message edited by: KnightEnder ]
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
Speaking of dreams.

I told Stacy about my "memories of dreams are the same as real memories" theory, and she said then Alyssa Milano should have me arrested for forcing her to have nonconsensual sex in my dreams. [Smile]

KE

[ March 25, 2005, 06:10 PM: Message edited by: KnightEnder ]
 
Posted by cperry (Member # 1938) on :
 
KE - Have you read Job: A Comedy of Justice? By Heinlein? I highly recommend it. You would love it, I'm guessing.
 
Posted by cperry (Member # 1938) on :
 
That Stacy, she sounds pretty smart.
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
cperry,

I have read it several times and, yes, I love it. And, yes, Stacy is pretty smart, too smart if you ask me.

KE
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
I have something to admit that I am ashamed of. I Tivo'd Bill O'Reilly. I don't know how I'll live with myself. I hope Stacy never finds out.

KE
 
Posted by The Drake (Member # 2128) on :
 
Man, I've never heard it called "Tivo" before [Razz]
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
I posted this on the Terri Shivo thread, but I know not everybody reads that thread and I wanted to share my story (a real one, not an OWW one), with y'all.

My little boy Jacob was 3 years old when some tables fell on him at church and cracked his skull in five places, cut the temporal lobe in his brain, broke his right orbital structure, broke his nose which released air into his brain causing it to become infected with meningitis. When I picked him up and carried him out of that church his eyes were swollen shut and blood was pouring out of his head, his nose, and his ears.

We used to have this thing when he was a baby; I would say "I love my little man" and he would reply "I love my big man", then I would say "Sweetest Jake I ever seen" and he would say "Sweetest daddy I ever seen". Silly kinda thing you say when talking to your baby.

We rushed him to the hospital which was practically across the street, and they refused to treat him, said he was beyond their ability to help. He started throwing up the blood that had run into his stomach from his broken nose, and what they told us was brain matter was running out of his ears. (Turned out to be peices of his inner ear canal and not brain tissue.)The told us that we could life-flight him but his chances of survival were slim and they didn't think he would survive the flight. We of course insisted that they fly him to Herman's Children Hospital (one of the best hospitals in the country). He got there and went through three operations. He was unconscious for about a week and his heart stopped twice while he was in the ICU.

They finally took him out of ICU and put us in a room where we could sleep with him. He hadn't talked in all this time and we didn't know if there was any brain damage or if he would be able to talk or see or function when and if he got better.

One day a couple of weeks later I was holding him in bed and talking to him. I said; "I love my little man", and he whispered "I love my big man". And I said "sweetest Jake I've ever seen" and he said "sweetest daddy I ever seen" and hugged me. I've never cried so hard in all my life. From those two sentences I knew my little boy was still in there. He still couldn't see through his swollen eyes, or get up and move around, but I knew it was still him inside.

The doctor's said it was a miracle he survived. He is running around now, 9 years later, like it never happened. He doesn't remember much. He remembers sleeping in bed with dad and mom, stuffing himself with candy, and watching Power Rangers (God I hate that movie). So, it's a good memory for him. It was the worst three weeks of my life.

But even if he had been damaged in some way I would have wanted him to survive. I would have taken him any way I could have him if he would only live. So, I kind of know how Terri's parents must feel, and I am beyond words sorry for them. A parent should not have to outlive their child. I don't know what I would have done if Jake had been in a PVS for as long as she has been. Thank God I didn't have to make the decision they have. I don't think I would be able to let go either.

Oh, and I still say to Jake; I love my little man, and he still replies, I love my big man. He's the sweetest baby I've ever seen. I never look at him that I don't think how lucky, or blessed (whatever that means to you), to have him in my life. I treasure every day I have with him.

KE
 
Posted by cperry (Member # 1938) on :
 
Wow, KE, what a powerful story. You and Jake ar so lucky. What a blessing.

I'm kind of in the same boat, opinion-wise, anyway. My mother- and father-in-law are visiting from FL, so they've heard this Schiavo story ad naseum. But what surprises me is that my m-i-l, who is VERY Catholic, thinks they ought to quit feeding her. So does my Catholic husband. I'm the only one in this house who feels any sympathy for the parents.

I have a living will; I do not want anyone to feel as if they have to take care of my body if my brain's not doing it for me. But since Terri didn't have one...well, it's a very difficult thing for a parent to do.
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
cperry, I need your email address if you want me to send you the OWW stories. Since your email address isn't available through OA, and due to the fact that I don't want to email through OA, nor even if I wanted to could I send attachments (stories) using the OA email link.

Email it to me and if you wish I will not diseminate it when I email out stories. However, if that is the case, maybe you would consider opening one of the free Google email accounts? They are invitation only, but I have a lot of invitations left and will be happy to send you, or anybody else that wants one, one. This way you could be part of the OWW and maintain some degree of aninimity, which I assume you want due to the fact that your email address is not available through OA.

And yes, Jake and I are very lucky. As close a reason as I can get for believing in God. [Smile]

KE
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
I am so proud of myself. I spent 8 hours changing out the water pump in my Buick today (with the guidance of my mom's husband). Anybody that knows anything about working on a front-wheel drive cars knows what a bitch that is. I was never taught to work on cars when I was a kid, as a mechanic I was a pretty good jock. So this is quite an accomplishment for me. [Big Grin]

KE
 
Posted by cperry (Member # 1938) on :
 
Here's to you, KE. I'm hoping never to have to master that particular task, but I understand the feeling of success.
 
Posted by cperry (Member # 1938) on :
 
Weird question:
Does it ever happen to any of you that OA won't let you post a reply, asks you to wait 30 seconds and try again, and this keeps happening, and finally you end up with multiple identical posts so you have to go back and delete the repeats? Or is this just something wonky with my laptop?
 
Posted by kenmeer livermaile (Member # 2243) on :
 
KE:

Three years old. That's the bestest age, thus a horrid age to see your child's life flowing out from his head.

Like the former slave woman told Mark Twain about her life: she'd seen troubles, and she'd seen joy.

I can't tell you, o compagnaros, how great it is to be here on Terra with us all.

"Or is this just something wonky with my laptop?"

My guess is it's something in your browser settings.
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
KL,

Yeah, the best and thus the worst, but I got him back and it made me realize even more how special he was. I'm afraid I spoiled him for a few years after that, couldn't stand to see him cry. But, eventually I had to start being a dad again for his own good. But he is still special. And I agree that when they are babies is the best. When they first start realizing who you are, and reaching and hugging you, I really miss that.

cperry, never had that problem, maybe the OM knows something.

KE
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
The worst job of casting.

The new "Bewitched" movie stars Nicole Kidman and Will Ferrel. Kidman is okay, but wouldn't Jim Carrey have been perfect as Darrin?

KE
 
Posted by witless chum (Member # 1643) on :
 
Orlando Bloom as a tough knight in Ridley Scott's Crusades movie seems equally bad. According to one movie site, he was fitted for a chest merkin so he'd look tougher.

Dan

(soundtrack, "Until I Fall Away" by Gin Blossoms)
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
He is a little "pretty" to play a tough guy.

Best casting ever was Patrick Stewart (Captain Picard on Star Trek the Next Generation) as Professor X.

On a seperate issue, and just for my general edification, is the group notified when someone is suspended or banned? What is the policy.

KE
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
Stargate and Battle Star Gallactica just keep getting better and better. Does anyone know what the deal is with John Crighton from Farscape coming on SG1 next year? Is he going to join the cast, replace one of them, or what?

Army Camo

Does anyone know where I could find a picture of the new camoflage the Army (or Marines) is supposed to be going to? It's supposed to be good for jungle, desert, and urban warfare.

KE

[ March 28, 2005, 12:54 AM: Message edited by: KnightEnder ]
 
Posted by WarrsawPact (Member # 1275) on :
 
After lots of edits -- at first I was thinking WAY ahead to optical active camo --

Okay, I found it.

It's the ACU, or Army Comnbat Uniform. Here's the link with a pic.

The Army's own link

A better link from globalsecurity.org

[ March 28, 2005, 01:26 AM: Message edited by: WarrsawPact ]
 
Posted by simplybiological (Member # 1344) on :
 
KE, that story made me want to have a kid for about 30 seconds, which is reallllly long for me.

CP- i had turkey, ham, and provolone on tomato basil today- REALLY good, worth the extra dollar [Smile]
 
Posted by A. Alzabo (Member # 1197) on :
 
quote:
After lots of edits -- at first I was thinking WAY ahead to optical active camo --

HaHa!

Check out these links:
web page
and
web page

Edited to add:

I've seen Marines around here wearing the woodland MARPAT BDUs, but that's it.

[ March 28, 2005, 02:02 AM: Message edited by: A. Alzabo ]
 
Posted by WarrsawPact (Member # 1275) on :
 
400 posts!

That turns the page. Look back on page 10 for your answer, KE.
 
Posted by WarrsawPact (Member # 1275) on :
 
I'd seen the University of Tokyo thing, but not the Nature thing. Crazy... how long, do you think, until we have a truer invisibility shield in the visible light spectrum?
 
Posted by cperry (Member # 1938) on :
 
SB - I may have to ask my hubby, who has been my "Honey, do this" for 18 days now, to bring one home for dinner!
 
Posted by cperry (Member # 1938) on :
 
SB - I never had a kid, but my daughter just had one. Now that has really made me miss having the experience of having a baby. It doesn't hurt that she's a reallyreally good baby, too.
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
SB, the one drawback to having children is the constant worry. And it never seems to go away. In fact the older they get, and the less control you have over their actions, the worse it seems to get.

WP, thanks.

KE
 
Posted by javelin (Member # 1284) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by cperry:
SB - I never had a kid, but my daughter just had one. Now that has really made me miss having the experience of having a baby. It doesn't hurt that she's a reallyreally good baby, too.

I almost didn't understand this one.
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
Does sound counter-intutive at first glance. Cperry also has a son, I think? Adopted I assume?

[ March 28, 2005, 05:30 PM: Message edited by: KnightEnder ]
 
Posted by kenmeer livermaile (Member # 2243) on :
 
"Does sound counter-intutive at first glance. Cperry also has a son, I think? Adopted I assume?"

Yeah, from Russia. Heart-breakinbg story. Feral child raised by nanny goats... [Wink]
 
Posted by javelin (Member # 1284) on :
 
KL - I asked you to keep my personal history to yourself. Sheesh!
 
Posted by The Drake (Member # 2128) on :
 
Is the number of threads devoted to Terri Schiavo threatening the internet? KLIF has this report and more at 11.
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
I just got finished hiding Easter Eggs for Jake. He knows there is no Easter Bunny but he still likes dyeing and searching for them. I swear he has no brain damage from his accident. [Wink] Although he is one of those people that is happy all the time. Not like me, my father, or my oldest son at all. [Mad] I wish I was like him. [Smile]

Does my new thread "Starving to Death vs Euthanasia" count as a Terri Shiavo thread?

[ March 28, 2005, 06:57 PM: Message edited by: KnightEnder ]
 
Posted by The Drake (Member # 2128) on :
 
She's in the lead sentence! Of course it counts [Smile]

If I were a parent, I would show my kid a scene from Donnie Darko, and say - "That's the Easter Bunny, son."
 
Posted by cperry (Member # 1938) on :
 
Jav, et al -
Yes, we adopted two teenagers from Russia a bit over 5 years ago. So I've got kids but never bore any. Trust me, many things about our experience have been counter-intuitive. Mom for 5 years, now a granny. Who'da thunk it?
 
Posted by kenmeer livermaile (Member # 2243) on :
 
"KL - I asked you to keep my personal history to yourself. Sheesh!"

Liar. You were raised by warthogs. At Hogwarts. By that big hairy guy who loves critters and lives in the tree roots and rides a flying motorcycle.

House-breaking you wasn't so bad, but getting you to stop rooting under the roots almost turned his hair grey...

Cperry: Are teenage goats still called 'kids'?
 
Posted by witless chum (Member # 1643) on :
 
"If I were a parent, I would show my kid a scene from Donnie Darko, and say - "That's the Easter Bunny, son.""

I think you'd be the best father ever.
Dan

(soundtrack: "Take the Skinheads Bowling" by Camper Van Beethoven)
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
I love Donnie Darko, but I'm not sure when breaking it to your child that a treasured childhood character is not real it is a good idea to tell them he is a dead drunk driving teenager who haunts people. Maybe I'm old-fashioned.

KE
 
Posted by The Drake (Member # 2128) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by KnightEnder:
I love Donnie Darko, but I'm not sure when breaking it to your child that a treasured childhood character is not real it is a good idea to tell them he is a dead drunk driving teenager who haunts people. Maybe I'm old-fashioned.

So I guess you wouldn't like how I'd show him Marathon Man to explain the tooth fairy?
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
Is it safe?
 
Posted by witless chum (Member # 1643) on :
 
Well, you're a knight, that's old fashioned.

I'm not sure I ever believed in the Easter Bunny or Santa. I remember pretending for my little sister, but I knew at like 4 or 5.

The best part of Easter was seeing my dad, who was 6'4" and went about 280 doing "the Bunny Hop"

Dan
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
Every year I used to ask my mom about Santa and every year she'd say: what do you think? And I'd say: Yes. And she'd say well then there is. One year when I was 7 she asked me that question and I said: If I knew I wouldn't be asking you. And she told me the truth. I was more upset about the Easter Bunny than Santa.

HEY, I missed it. How come we didn't have a party for KL's 2000th post? Cogratulations KL. Probably the fastest ever to 2k. [Smile]

KE

[ March 29, 2005, 12:02 AM: Message edited by: KnightEnder ]
 
Posted by kenmeer livermaile (Member # 2243) on :
 
"HEY, I missed it. How come we didn't have a party for KL's 2000th post? Cogratulations KL. Probably the fastest ever to 2k."

The fact that myt HHT has gotten really out of hand lately contributes to this. Today, for example, was basically one long noseblood with awkward interruptions to fold a little laundry, cook some dinner, and attend a parent-teacher conference. The rest of my time has been set here with a homemade nasal tampon up my nose reading and writing because to do anything else just made me bleed more, or reading about Izzy/Palestine and the history of the constants of physics (like the gravitational constant, for example). Guy writing about constants knows his stuff, and has a decided poetic streak, but couldn't explain the scientific meaning of most of what he addresses if th speed of light depended on it. Typical.

Not that I ain't having fun.
 
Posted by fotwennytime (Member # 1037) on :
 
congrats KL. not on getting 2000 posts, anybody with free time and thick skin could do that.

i congratulate you for getting the 420th post on this thread. had i seen 419 i woulda raced you for it.
 
Posted by cperry (Member # 1938) on :
 
"A kid'll eat ivy too, wouldn't you?"

Yep, teenager, goat...same thing, right?
 
Posted by javelin (Member # 1284) on :
 
KL - maybe you want to join the rest of us nose-bleeders who have been introduced to the wonderful world of cauterization? Hurt? No, of course not! Permenant solution? What's that? Stop it from bleeding for awhile, maybe make them less severe? I guess so. So JUST DO IT! Get the veins in your nose burned all to hell, TODAY! Whoohoo!
 
Posted by kenmeer livermaile (Member # 2243) on :
 
"congrats KL. not on getting 2000 posts, anybody with free time and thick skin could do that."

Truer words were never spoken.

"i congratulate you for getting the 420th post on this thread. had i seen 419 i woulda raced you for it."

Ah, but looky here: fotwenny-WON!

"KL - maybe you want to join the rest of us nose-bleeders who have been introduced to the wonderful world of cauterization? Hurt? No, of course not! Permenant solution? What's that? Stop it from bleeding for awhile, maybe make them less severe? I guess so. So JUST DO IT! Get the veins in your nose burned all to hell, TODAY! Whoohoo!"

Done it 3-4 times in 13 years. Last time was a doozy. Found out since then that stanbdard cauterization is very BAD for folks with HHT. The new laser stuff is way better. Guy who fried my nose the last time (even though the tactile nerves are numbed, the olfactory nerves keep sending the lovely stench of chared nostril flesh) didn't think I'd need pain pills.

DUMB-ASS.....

So two hours later I'm hard-swigging brandy and sniffing the fumes to numb my sinuses until it occurs to me that sniffing like that is probably goping straight through the bloodbrain barrier...

Oregon Health and Science University in Portland's got an HHT research team; they also have a local ENT doc on tap whom they've trained in how to best repair leaky blood vessels like mine. I may end up getting some skin transpalented into me sinuses...

""A kid'll eat ivy too, wouldn't you?"

Yep, teenager, goat...same thing, right?"

Almost. Goats are fussier about what they'll eat but don't whine about it narly as much.
 
Posted by cperry (Member # 1938) on :
 
KL - I did some (light) reading on HHT. Wow. I hope nose bleeds are the worst of it for you. Never knew this condition existed.

I had 3 nosebleeds last week, from the meds I was taking or something--not sure why. Never, ever had 'em as a kid. What a pain. Well, I'm glad to know you're able to read and write while you're down.
 
Posted by javelin (Member # 1284) on :
 
KL - if you come down here to Portland - let me know - I'll meet you at a bar somewhere and maybe even spring for some "pain killers"...

I haven't got a chance to play with the laser cauterization stuff yet - I think I'll just do what I have been doing - I'd rather bleed for an hour than have my nose burned off.
 
Posted by kenmeer livermaile (Member # 2243) on :
 
So you have HHT too, jav? If so, we ARE a coincidental couple, oui?

But no bars. I've got this alcohol thing licked finally and I'm a-stay that way.

cperry: the tests in Portland will determ,ine if I have any serious propsects from HHT. Probably not. Only about 15% have life-threatening bleeds. I'm probably just gonna have a semi-debilitating leaky nose for the rest of my life. If so, IU;d better get to work on turning my line of BS into publisher's checks. Funny how many authors were FORCED into their trade. RL Stevenson, for example: good for nothing else.
 
Posted by cperry (Member # 1938) on :
 
"I'm probably just gonna have a semi-debilitating leaky nose for the rest of my life. If so, IU;d better get to work on turning my line of BS into publisher's checks. Funny how many authors were FORCED into their trade. RL Stevenson, for example: good for nothing else."

Some people would see that as a sign of God's hand in their lives.

I'm happy to hear it's just a leaky nose. A nuisance, yes, but not a tragedy. Degrees are important.
 
Posted by javelin (Member # 1284) on :
 
Ah - sorry - no HHT here - I just have a deviated septum that has exposed the veins in my nose a bit too much, so when it gets dry, and there isn't enough moisture, it compensates with the red stuff.
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
Is 420 the marijuana referendum? [Confused]

Sorry to hear about your condition KL. I hope it gets better. But look at the bright side, your pain is OA's gain. [Wink]
 
Posted by simplybiological (Member # 1344) on :
 
hey KE
http://www.snopes.com/language/stories/420.htm
 
Posted by cperry (Member # 1938) on :
 
That's one way to look at it, KE!
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
Thanks SB.
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
WP,

Apparently it doesn't work. I could still see the soldier.

KE
 
Posted by hywer (Member # 2046) on :
 
Random thought, appropriately placed in the msc. chat thread: passed 100 posts... gosh I'm slow...

Some of you are just sick. Thousands of posts... oi...

^-^
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
Congrats Hywer. You're not slow you just haven't been here that long. It ebbs and flows. Some months I'll post a lot and then months will go by and I won't post hardly at all. You'll see.
 
Posted by hywer (Member # 2046) on :
 
I already know. It's just that the ups are much lower than yours. And, speaking of ebbs and flows, better get back to work...

(Source: take the number of your posts divided by the months you've been here, and compare a similar statistic made with my numbers. Ha. It's laughable. But I likes it that way. ^_^)

[ March 30, 2005, 02:12 AM: Message edited by: hywer ]
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
I don't want to keep you from working, you can tell me tomorrow, but what work do you do that keeps you up so late, if you don't mind my asking?
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
Whoa! I did the math. 105 a month. And that doesn't take into account the six months I took off in protest after the Ornery 8 incident. Let's see...142 a month. Good thing OA is educational.

What was yours KL? WP? Ev?

[ March 30, 2005, 03:33 AM: Message edited by: KnightEnder ]
 
Posted by fotwennytime (Member # 1037) on :
 
yay my name makes sense now.
 
Posted by kenmeer livermaile (Member # 2243) on :
 
"Some of you are just sick."

I'm not 'just' sick. I'm ambitiously ill. There's muscle to my madness...

I forget where to find the stats and I don't much care but I reckon I easilt post 10 a day: that's 300/month. But the real figure's probably 500/month.

[ March 30, 2005, 10:22 AM: Message edited by: kenmeer livermaile ]
 
Posted by kenmeer livermaile (Member # 2243) on :
 
"yay my name makes sense now"

You do an adorable imitation of a child's stuffed animal come to life.
 
Posted by Slander Monkey (Member # 1999) on :
 
Kenmeer, don't be so modest...
785/mo and 26/day is more like it.

At least you keep them brief... [Razz]
 
Posted by hywer (Member # 2046) on :
 
lol!

I have the same non-brevity problem...

Ev and WP are also impressive, this is certain... On one of the few topics I really kept up on, I was going at it hard with both of them, but they were each on a couple more topics doing the same. Oi.

[ March 30, 2005, 01:50 PM: Message edited by: hywer ]
 
Posted by kenmeer livermaile (Member # 2243) on :
 
Wow. 26/day.
 
Posted by javelin (Member # 1284) on :
 
Dang. I've only got 43/month (1.4/day), apparently - that's purty crazy, Mr. L.

[ March 30, 2005, 02:40 PM: Message edited by: javelin ]
 
Posted by FiredrakeRAGE (Member # 1224) on :
 
I've got about 36/month (1.2/day). I'm impressed that Kenmeer's daily score is so close to my monthly score [Wink]

--Firedrake
 
Posted by javelin (Member # 1284) on :
 
Not sure I'd use the word "impressed", perhaps "concerned", "afraid", "worried"? [Wink]
 
Posted by simplybiological (Member # 1344) on :
 
i average 62 a month, but actually 93 since i took a big long hiatus when i was living without electricity for months and subsequently was cured of my internet addiction (i have since fallen off the wagon).

i have a second date tonight! woooo!
 
Posted by simplybiological (Member # 1344) on :
 
second date = wildy successful.

our first date was very activity oriented, we had coffee, saw a movie, had dinner, had drinks, etc.

this one... went to dinner, then went to campus and walked around on the roof of my office building, then went to his place (wow he has a great place) and listened to music and played with the dog. it was all very chill and really awesome. like him.
 
Posted by cperry (Member # 1938) on :
 
Good signs, SB. Very exciting!
 
Posted by kenmeer livermaile (Member # 2243) on :
 
"Not sure I'd use the word "impressed", perhaps "concerned", "afraid", "worried"?"

Just 'resigned'. I started at Ornery while enjoying the Never-Ending FLu. Expected it to fizzle soon, fora being what they mostly are. But Ornery has some kind of critical mass, not to mention an ape cousin in the form of Monsieur Dey who does an excellent best-cheating, er, chest-beating orangutan to my bonobo chimpansy.

Not that his is the only personality off which I enjoy reflecting my mind...
 
Posted by cperry (Member # 1938) on :
 
KL - I wondered if you'd noticed that.
 
Posted by simplybiological (Member # 1344) on :
 
CP- the way he treats his dog totally cemented the notion for me that he's a really good person- he built (built!) a bed for himself that was low to the ground so his bassett hound could get off and on it without getting stiff joints. i'm pretty sure there was an element of testing my dog-friendliness in that date last night... he seemed very relieved.
 
Posted by kenmeer livermaile (Member # 2243) on :
 
"KL - I wondered if you'd noticed that."

Noticed what? (kenmeerian per peeve: cryptic replies with no referntial quote by which to decrypt their 'key'.) Noticed Richard's remarkable verbal resemblance to the librarian orangutan from Prathcett's infamous Discworld series?
 
Posted by kenmeer livermaile (Member # 2243) on :
 
"CP- the way he treats his dog totally cemented the notion for me that he's a really good person- he built (built!) a bed for himself that was low to the ground so his bassett hound could get off and on it without getting stiff joints. i'm pretty sure there was an element of testing my dog-friendliness in that date last night... he seemed very relieved."

A) If'n agirl don' like yo dawg, she don' like yew.

B) Our youngst dog is an adorable dachshund named Scooter. We built a ramp along the foot of our bed so he can get up and down from bed at night. (He sleeps with us; dachshunds are Evolution/God/Fate's zenith of loving creatures. NO one, not even your firstborn, cuddles as perfectly as a dachshund.

Bassets test one's olfactory patience as they grow older, but their emulation of Old Grandpa dachshund is ALMOST as endearing as a dachshund's simple ability to just plain love...
 
Posted by cperry (Member # 1938) on :
 
KL - Sorry. Lazy. Yes, Monsieur Dey's talents.

SB - Well, he wins points in my book, not that it matters. Our Rhodesian Ridgeback, all 80 lbs of her, freqently sleeps under the covers. Were I looking for a partner, that would most certainly be a test! This is looking promising for you! (And by the way, did you write that post-date post at 3:51 this morning???)
 
Posted by simplybiological (Member # 1344) on :
 
quote:
(And by the way, did you write that post-date post at 3:51 this morning???)
i was wondering if anyone noticed that. *grin* yeah. both of our dates have gone from about 6pm until 3:30am or so... time flies, and usually from 1 until 3 we intermittantly discuss how it really IS time to go and oh we both have work the next day... he said it was "refreshing to be sleep deprived again" because it makes him feel like he's not succumbing to the work-eat-sleep routine without a fight. i'm actually not that tired because i'm such a rockstar that i can do these things.

i'm all stoked and hyper because i'm having such a good time... i know i like someone if they make me get dorky and giddy.
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
SB, I'm glad to hear your date went well. He sounds like a great guy. I gave a girlfriend a basset hound once, his name was MacArthur, Mac for short. Her mother has him now.

CP, I'm sure she was home well before that! Our dog sleeps under the covers with us too. I may have mentioned it before but I think it is neat, did y'all know that the band "3 Dog Night" refers to the number of dogs you need in bed with you on a particularly cold night? Neat, huh?

KE
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
Oops! Guess not. (SB replied while I was typing my last post.)

I love that first getting to know somebody stage. It is the one major drawback to marriage. For me anyway. Looking at the divorce rate it doesn't seem to slow some people down.

KE
 
Posted by cperry (Member # 1938) on :
 
SB - Actually, that's a great sign. You're so into it, you don't want to leave. You go, rockstar!

KE - Don't remember hearing about your dog under the covers, but these correspondences are passing from coincidence into the realm of the uncanny.
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
The news just had a teaser "Can taking Viagra make you go blind" today at 5! I can't wait till KL gets ahold of that one.
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
Now they have interupted the last five minutes of my wife's favorite soap to report that the Pope has a fever. Wait, a very high fever. Is an old man feeling bad such important new that it can't wait for the regular news. If Viagra making you go blind can wait surely this can.

[ March 31, 2005, 04:03 PM: Message edited by: KnightEnder ]
 
Posted by OpsanusTau (Member # 2350) on :
 
From The Guardian, five or so minutes ago:

quote:
VATICAN CITY (AP) - Pope John Paul II's medical condition has worsened, the Italian news agency Apcom reported Thursday night, citing unidentified sources. The Vatican had no immediate comment on the report.

Apcom said doctors had to intervene because of a ``worrying lowering of (blood) pressure.'' The news agency also said the pope reportedly had a high fever.

A Vatican official, speaking on condition of anonymity, said he was unaware the pontiff's condition had worsened, adding that the pope's situation was ``regular'' a few hours ago.


 
Posted by simplybiological (Member # 1344) on :
 
mitch hedberg died. that is thoroughly not ok.

my usual thursday afternoon margarita consumption will now be dedicated to mitch...

man.
 
Posted by javelin (Member # 1284) on :
 
One of my favorite stand ups [Frown] Damn. What a depressing day.
 
Posted by hywer (Member # 2046) on :
 
Question: what goes into the Archives, and how? And why? Some of you older folks with littler numbers under your names will have to explain this to me. I noticed there's nothing new in there since more than a year ago.

Are we just too big now? There are some threads I can think of from my lurker days and then from last fall that might merit a look, but I think I can understand that it would be near impossible for just one guy/gal (OM?) to go through EVERY THREAD and pick what he/she thinks is the best.
 
Posted by simplybiological (Member # 1344) on :
 
oh, everything gets archived... eventually.

if you start the thread, you get an email when it goes to the archives. i think it's perhaps a year with no posts? something like that?

holy crap i'm drunk. is drunk posting like drunk dialing?
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
I never got no stinking emails. [Smile]

It depends on what you post. [Wink]

KE
 
Posted by kenmeer livermaile (Member # 2243) on :
 
"holy crap i'm drunk. is drunk posting like drunk dialing?"

Yup. This is the Onanic American. We're all thinking about you and what you're wearing and wondering why you won't turn your webcam on and do a slow grind for us... or we would if we weren't all blind from Viagra.
 
Posted by witless chum (Member # 1643) on :
 
Feeling all nice and popculturey,
bestest teen movies:
1. Dazed and Confused
2. Fast Times at Ridgemont High
3. American Pie
4. Slums of Beverly Hills
5. Porky's

Dan

(soundtrack: "War Pigs" by Black Sabbath)
 
Posted by hywer (Member # 2046) on :
 
Why the heck would you watch that many teen movies? [Razz]

Happy April fools day, east coast and beyond!

I'm locking my door. Neighbors are looking suspicious...
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
1. Fast Times at Ridgemont High
2. The Breakfast Club
3. Weird Science
4. Risky Business
5. Real Genius

Honorable mention: Porky's, Pretty in Pink, American Pie, Real Genius, & Not Another Teen Movie. (Off the top of my head) [Smile]
 
Posted by simplybiological (Member # 1344) on :
 
In no particular order:

real genius
better off dead
say anything
the breakfast club
jawbreaker.

john hughes is the master of teen movies.
 
Posted by cperry (Member # 1938) on :
 
breakfast club
weird science
risky business
say anything

not sure if i know any more
 
Posted by javelin (Member # 1284) on :
 
SB - that's my list - give it back!
 
Posted by The Drake (Member # 2128) on :
 
Real Genius
Fast Times at Ridgemont High
Sixteen Candles
Better off Dead
Not Another Teen Movie*

*This was a spoof, but extremely funny.
 
Posted by simplybiological (Member # 1344) on :
 
i just went upstairs to work and the camera battery was dead, so now i'm killing a little time until it can recharge.

camera for what, you say? here's a couple pictures i took today before the battery conked out on me:

www.sbs.utexas.edu/shawk/basking.htm

cool, huh? that's a butterfly from mid-elevation french alps, hanging out in our greenhouse. i'm doing a thermal study on take off temperatures of butterflies from different latitudes and altitudes... the non-thermal picture is of euphydryas editha, the one i usually work on... there will be some of them (from northern california), some of melitaea cinxia (from finland and different spots in the french alps), some euphydryas aurinea (spain and france) and some totally unrelated helioconius species that i happen to have access to, and perhaps some pierids from around here. it's my master's data, which is pilot data for a climate change study by the woman who owns the camera.

anyway, that little guy is sitting on an envelope (tiny little butterfly, yes), warming up to try to fly. i think it's neat.

also, yes. the temptation to take thermal pictures of oneself is very high.
 
Posted by Adam Lassek (Member # 1514) on :
 
I think we're having some difficulty with the definition of "teen movie." A teen movie is anything released during the summer for kids with too much time on their hands to waste their money on. "The Breakfast Club" or "Real Genius" aren't teen movies just because they have teen characters in them.
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
I forgot Say Anything.
 
Posted by FiredrakeRAGE (Member # 1224) on :
 
I just saw the BattleStar Gallactica finale. It was really, really good.

Even most main stream channel shows pale in comparison to the last few episodes of BSG.

--Firedrake
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
I agree, it is a great show. Lost is getting pretty danged good as well.

KE
 
Posted by Funean (Member # 2345) on :
 
I really like House, when I get to see it (when it's my turn to put the girl down, it's a pitched battle. The boy is much more reasonable). I hope it doesn't degenerate into a soapy thing, though those are fine in their place (Everwood, for example. Darned hiatus). I much prefer it as it is, with the focus on diagnosis and the wonderful crankiness of its main character.

I also like Medium, for its marvelous depiction of marriage. That one I usually get to see, because if they're not asleep by 10, I start thinking Benadryl.

edit because, again, verbs are cool.

[ April 02, 2005, 12:30 PM: Message edited by: Funean ]
 
Posted by WmLambert (Member # 604) on :
 
The last BSG WAS way, way out. How many cliffhangers are allowed before you automatically jump the shark? There's VP Gaius Baltar in a crucifiction position lying in a field on Kobol after seeing Rosemary's baby... there's Lt. Kara 'Starbuck' Thrace screaming because a Cylon Sharon 'Boomer' Valerii is also carrying Rosemary's baby... President Laura Roslin is in prison on the orders of Commander William "Husker" Adama, who is himself gutshot by the original Sharon 'Boomer' Valerii and lying in that same cruxifix position in a pool of blood backlit by an unused light box... There is Captain Lee 'Apollo' Adama under arrest for mutiny... and Col. Saul Tigh, a drunken cuckold ready to shoot the next person who blinks.

This is a great show, but have they taken it too far? I guess we wait and see.

This scares me, because of the last great shows I've enjoyed, Cupid, Sports Night, and Monk... The first two were cancelled, and Monk is teetering on whether to jump or not by firing Bitty Schram. Of course its on the same time as DSG so the TV Gods are laughing, antyway.
 
Posted by Funean (Member # 2345) on :
 
So I'm cleaning out my library, which also serves, sadly, as a dumping ground for things like the Christmas boxes, outgrown kid clothes, filing, etc...it's a tragedy, but improving, but now I've diverted myself from anything productive by organizing the books. Since we moved here with 57 boxes of books (the movers counted them in horror) and added many more in the 6 years since then, I should be able to completely avoid anything like real cleaning for days.

I'm finding lots of old friends and wondering if folks here enjoy similar stuff, and/or can suggest new authors (because, of course, it simply isn't possible to have too many books).

My best loved single book: "Winter's Tale," by Mark Helprin. Gorgeous, just gorgeous.

Anything by Andrew Vachhs, but particularly the lovely noir Burke series

Sheri Tepper, despite her tedious polemics, for her fabulous imagination

Charles DeLint, when I'm feeling in need of fairies

Richard Tannenbaum's Butch Karp/Marlene Ciampi series--just great, for wit and snappy dialogue

John D. MacDonald's Travis McGee series. I've been in love with Travis since I was 12.

Nearly all science fiction, though like someone else said, I never really did see what all the fuss about Dune was.

I'm sure I'm forgetting some, and I'm leaving the shameful loves out, as I'm just not ready to admit them here. [Smile]
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
We love House. We Tivo Veronica Mars and watch House. And I loved Sports Night, too. It amazes me some of the good shows that don't make it. Like Life as We Know It.

KE
 
Posted by cperry (Member # 1938) on :
 
The TV show I loved the most and was totally despondent about when it concluded is China Beach. I cannot wait for it to come out on DVD, if it ever does.

Funny how many of us here like Veronica and House.

Funean - I just couldn't get into Helprin's Winter's Tale. Have you read anything by Octavia Butler?
 
Posted by Funean (Member # 2345) on :
 
I forgot about Octavia Butler. It seems to me that I read the first couple books of a series or trilogy, fell into despair waiting for the next, and then completely forgot her. As I recall she was great...isn't there some kind of unique take on what would otherwise be a convention of the genre? Must go to library...

You have to get past the first couple of chapters of Winter's Tale, as they meander. It's worth it, really.
 
Posted by cperry (Member # 1938) on :
 
Funean - I'll dig up Winter's Tale and give it another go. It does help to know that perhaps there is a struggle at the beginning that's worth it. Do look for Butler. I have her trilogy in one volume. There are other good ones, too. (If getting up the stairs wasn't such a trial right now, I'd run up there and get some titles for you!) I'm sure you've read The Sparrow, yes?
 
Posted by Funean (Member # 2345) on :
 
<small voice>

I'm not sure. I don't remember the titles I did read, just that they came as a breath of fresh air. Er, one was blue. This was like 17 or 18 years ago. I'll look her up immediately, really.

<end small voice>

Regarding Winter's Tale, if you like lyrical language, heartbreaking faith in humanity despite full awareness of our frailties and vast swooping stories....well, I'm not objective. If you hate magical realism it might annoy you in parts, although it's not fully of that genre. But anyone who loves the English language should read it.
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
I just last night read "Speech Sounds" by Octavia Butler. It was a great short story.

CPerry, this is getting weird. (Twilight Zone music plays) I think we were meant for each other. Do you believe in soul mates? [Wink]

The story was in the anthology Future On Ice, edited by Orson Scott Card. In the forward OSC says whenever he is asked who his favorite science fiction writer is his short answer is Ocavia Butler. High praise, indeed, coming from the guy I consider the best.

KE

[ April 02, 2005, 08:16 PM: Message edited by: KnightEnder ]
 
Posted by cperry (Member # 1938) on :
 
F - an even better reason for me to read it. I'll def give it a second shot. The Sparrow is by Russell, not Butler. Sorry for the confusion. I get lazy sometimes and leave out important info.

KE - I do believe in soulmates. Also in kindred spirits. Cool to know OSC likes Butler. In his comments to the VA English teachers assoc, he said Asimov was "the best" writer. But in my introductory comments, I mentioned Butler. Maybe that won me a brownie point or two. (Brainlessly, I helped myself to a cinnamon Altoid after his speech, as we were setting up for his signing, and I failed to offer him any. Dumb nerves.)
 
Posted by cperry (Member # 1938) on :
 
KE - I havent' read Speech Sounds. Will look for it. Glad to know there's more of her stuff out there.
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
Kindred spirits. We are definitely that. And it fits perfectly. Also, it saves us the trouble of getting rid of our spouses. [Smile]

KE

[ April 02, 2005, 08:35 PM: Message edited by: KnightEnder ]
 
Posted by cperry (Member # 1938) on :
 
I suspect they'll be glad to hear that!
 
Posted by Funean (Member # 2345) on :
 
Oh and I forgot Connie Willis's "To Say Nothing of the Dog" and several others.

edited because I care about apostrophes

[ April 02, 2005, 10:14 PM: Message edited by: Funean ]
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
I can't beleive I forgot this one.
This one is my favorite Teen Movie of all time:

"Ferris Bueller's Day Off"

If I could still edit my list
I would go back and make this number 1.

KE

[ April 03, 2005, 03:49 AM: Message edited by: KnightEnder ]
 
Posted by cperry (Member # 1938) on :
 
KE - This is uncanny. I thought of Ferris Bueller's Day Off last night and wondered it if was too late to return to the teen movie conversation.

Really really weird.
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
Any minute Rod Serling is gonna pop up. (Twilight Zone theme music)

KE
 
Posted by EDanaII (Member # 1062) on :
 
@ WmLambert:

I had a problem with the BG season finale too. It was just TOO much.

*** Spoiler Alert ***


I can take most of what happened, but Sharon flying onto the Basestar, leaving a nuke then flying back to the Galactica to shoot Adama bordered on the ABSURD!

First, the Basestar BS was to Borg-esque for me. No identification protocols (other than the transponder). No visual identification procedures. No "what is your purpose in coming here?" "What's the secret password?"

"We know the Galactica's near, we just shot down one of their Raptors, so, you couldn't possibley be a Raptor from the Galactica carrying a nuke and a stolen transponder intent on destroying us."

"Sure! Come on board! Leave the nuke! We wanna die!"

If that wasn't goofy enough. Then she goes back and shoots Adama.

Seems to me, were I a Cylon agent, I'd wanna do B first, so I wouldn't have to do A.

This show has been good, but it has stretched credibility on many occasions. This is one of those occasions.

Ed.
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
**********Spoiler Alert**********

And why was the ship so biological?
I realize they are biological robots but
what was the purpose of all the ooze or whatever.

And Boomer, talk about conflicted. She kills all
the cylons like her, then kills Adama?
Pick a side, lady!

And Adama has to be dead. He lost way to much blood
and she hit way to many vital organs
for him to make it. So is he gone
from the show?

And why did the cylon Starbuck was
fighting die from a rod through the back?
Are they exactly the same as us
with all our weaknesses? That would
be stupid. Especially for the ones
that weren't going to be working in
close proximity to humans. And she
handled Starbuck like a child until
Starbuck suddenly overwhelms her and
knocks her off the one-story drop, that
Starbuck survives and the robot doesn't.

Where do the eggs come from for
the cylon women to get pregnant?
And why are they trying to have
babies and falling in love with
humans now? Why couldn't they
"just get along" with us at first?
I'm a little vague on the first episode
so if anyone knows the answer to
these questions I would appreciate it.

I really like the show,
but this wasn't their best.

KE

[ April 03, 2005, 12:36 PM: Message edited by: KnightEnder ]
 
Posted by simplybiological (Member # 1344) on :
 
funean, i haven't read a single one of the authors you listed, so my recommendation powers are poor, but here are my favorite authors/the book i like best by them:

douglas coupland, "microserfs"
tom robbins, "fierce invalids home from hot climates"
chris moore, "Lamb: the gospel according to biff, christ's childhood pal."
chuck palahniuk, "survivor"
jincy willett, "jenny and the jaws of life"
michael chabon, "the amazing adventures of Kavalier and Clay"

other random books: clevenger, "the contortionist's handbook." niffenegger, "the time traveler's wife." burroughs, "dry" and "running with scissors." anything david sedaris or sarah vowell does. chalmers, "who's who in hell." dunn, "geek love."

i heart books.
 
Posted by Funean (Member # 2345) on :
 
Boooooks (long shuddering Homer Simpson moan)

Yeah, they're pretty much food to me. I forgot Tom Robbins and David Sedaris, whom I love. Loved "Geek Love" too. The rest...I HAVE NOT READ. Joy!!! (rummages about, looking for library card).
 
Posted by cperry (Member # 1938) on :
 
Well, I'll ditto the recs on Michael Chabon . Kavalier and Clay was fantastic.
 
Posted by cperry (Member # 1938) on :
 
Hey. Anyone else with a Gmail account unable to get into your inbox?

For awhile, I couldn't even get Gmail to come up. Now I can't get my box to open when I login. All I get is this crazy activity at the bottom of my screen as if my login has entered some space-time loop.
 
Posted by FiredrakeRAGE (Member # 1224) on :
 
KnightEnder said
quote:
He lost way to much blood and she hit way to many vital organs for him to make it.
I disagree. I've heard of a guy that was shot seven times in the chest and abdomen. By the time he got to the hospital he was bleeding pink (due to the huge amount of saline), and decompensating, but he was still alive. The human body is an amazing thing - it can shrug off mortal injuries with little issue. Given that the 'tech in BSG seems both futuristic and antiquated, it is a bit hard to make a case either way.

--Firedrake

[Edited to clarify and delete]

[ April 03, 2005, 08:10 PM: Message edited by: FiredrakeRAGE ]
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
I hope you're right, I like Adama.

KE
 
Posted by fotwennytime (Member # 1037) on :
 
quote:
I never really did see what all the fuss about Dune was.

my favorite part of dune was deciphering all of the drug references, and figuring out which frank herbert was on.
 
Posted by EDanaII (Member # 1062) on :
 
*** continued Galactica Spoiler Alert ***

@ KnightEnder & FiredrakeRAGE

Don't worry guys, despite the numerous shots fired, Boomer clearly missed Adama's _contract._ [Wink] As far as I know, it was renewed, so he will be returning to for another season.

As to the questions you raise, KE...

I think the best answer offered so far about the human-form Cylons is that they are actually human clones modified to fit Cylon needs.

I'm guessing, but I suspect that the reason why there are only twelve models is that this is the number of humans that the cylons could successfully clone and modify and that those modifications rendered them "mules;" they can mate but cannot have children. I think the whole Rosemary's baby thing is to create human servants that can reproduce.

But, as I said, I'm just guessing.

As to Boomer picking a side, she's a "sleeper" agent, as I understand it, who only suspects that she's a cylon; well, OK, she KNOWS it now. My issue with the whole thing is that if your "sleeper programming" is gonna suddenly wake up, its gonna be before your "enemy" does great damage to you, not afterwards.

But the truth is, her "sleeper programming" woke up so we could have an "exciting season finale" regardless of how absurd it was.

Ed.
 
Posted by The Drake (Member # 2128) on :
 
I can't even bring myself to watch BG. I grew up on the original, and remember playing Starbuck, Apollo, and Boomer on the swingsets at school. Cylons were crappy robot costumes with a swerving LED that squeaked as it panned back and forth.

Why can't they just make a new story about Earth colonies that get attacked? They're sponging off the old name, and that's just plain lazy. It may be a very good series, but I'll stick with my memories (which are also much cooler than watching reruns of the old show).
 
Posted by kenmeer livermaile (Member # 2243) on :
 
Banuyo

Carangidae, exship? Unscanty talismanist decocainize nearly before Ephraitic unchronicled

And so on. A whole page of it. Somebody's experiment with a random generator using a dictionary? This one I really like:

promisable beauteously upblacken overswing. Paternalist: glossarially nonrefueling toxicosis typologically

[ April 05, 2005, 01:21 AM: Message edited by: kenmeer livermaile ]
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
I grew up loving that show too. I wonder if the reruns of this BSG will look as silly as those do? I guess they will but I don't see how.

KE
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
Anyone know why we evolved to be one hand dominate? Wouldn't evolving to be ambidextrous make more sense?

KE
 
Posted by kenmeer livermaile (Member # 2243) on :
 
"Anyone know why we evolved to be one hand dominate? Wouldn't evolving to be ambidextrous make more sense?"

Since we seem to crossover from right to left and left to right between brain and body symmetry, perhaps survival favored those who trained one side of the brain to master things like spear-chucking, which only needs on arm anyway (one can't effectively throw two objects at once).
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
Another short story in the anthology edited by OSC "Future On Ice" is a story titled "Press Enter" by John Varley it is the best short story I've ever read. The second best was one of the winners of the first Phobos Writers Contest. I don't remember the author or title, I'll have to find it, but it was about new armor that render the wearer and his unit invisable in the field. I know it doesn't sound like much but the twist was awesome.

KE

[ April 05, 2005, 05:27 AM: Message edited by: KnightEnder ]
 
Posted by Funean (Member # 2345) on :
 
KL:
If you don't have spam protection, some of the automails have really spectacular names. To wit, from my box:

Staphlococci R. Sally
Dracula Fishman
Elwood Fleabane

and my favorite

John Thomas Long

KE:

I'm going to have go out and get this anthology. Oh, and do you ever sleep? [Smile]

More authors I like: Carol O'Connor (Mallory series); China Mieville (King Rat, Scar, Perdito Station)
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
Weird hours. I've always been a nightowl. To bad the world doesn't work on that schedule.

KE
 
Posted by OpsanusTau (Member # 2350) on :
 
quote:
Anyone know why we evolved to be one hand dominate? Wouldn't evolving to be ambidextrous make more sense?
Yes, and I've always thought that those of us who can write with either hand have way more survival value than the rest of you who can't. [Cool]
Evolution works as a selective force - there would have to be differential survival and/or reproductive success between single-hand dominance and ambidexterity for the predominant phenotype to change. It's not enough for ambidexterity to be a better idea -- something would have to make righthandedness disadvantageous relative to ambidexterity in order for anything to change.
I am just making this up, however.
 
Posted by EDanaII (Member # 1062) on :
 
quote:
Anyone know why we evolved to be one hand dominate? Wouldn't evolving to be ambidextrous make more sense?
In my opinion, this is one of those "limits to the possible" kinda things, KE.

Take a book, place it a foot in front of your nose and look at it. How well can you read it? Now, take that same book, and hold it at an angle to your face so that it is at the edge of your peripheral vision. How much detail can you make out now?

You have an area of focus in the center of your vision that allows you to process more detail than the rest of your field of vision. This, I believe, is because more "processing power" is required to comprehend that information.

I believe the same is true for hand/eye coordination, the finer control of your hands that you need, the more processing power from the brain is required to control it.

As to why left or right? I suspect that one hand dominates because one side of the brain dominates, the side that is best able to manage the task.

Ed.
 
Posted by kenmeer livermaile (Member # 2243) on :
 
a) "Since we seem to crossover from right to left and left to right between brain and body symmetry, perhaps survival favored those who trained one side of the brain to master things like spear-chucking, which only needs on arm anyway (one can't effectively throw two objects at once)."

b)"You have an area of focus in the center of your vision that allows you to process more detail than the rest of your field of vision. This, I believe, is because more "processing power" is required to comprehend that information.

"I believe the same is true for hand/eye coordination, the finer control of your hands that you need, the more processing power from the brain is required to control it.

"As to why left or right? I suspect that one hand dominates because one side of the brain dominates, the side that is best able to manage the task."

There. 2 great minds thinking alike. Cross-haired vision:
center of vision
 
Posted by simplybiological (Member # 1344) on :
 
I think the discrepancy is also reinforced by the notion of dominant hands... when i was in kindergarden i was told i'm right-handed... though i imagine if i put 20 or so years into trying to write with my left hand, it wouldn't be too shabby.
is my right hand dominant? sure. does it need to be as dominant as it is? no. the difference in my hand abilities is only visible in writing... i knit ambidexterously, i open jars with my left-hand, when i was a kid i occasionally played tennis left-handed when playing against people much worse than i... so part of it, i think, is just practice.
 
Posted by lessismore (Member # 2092) on :
 
In my parent’s day, if they were left handed they would have their left hands tied behind their backs forcing them to write with their right hand. It didn't take 20 years to master.
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
Thanks for answering my question. My free education thanks to OA continues. [Smile]

Ed, mentioned field of vision. Are y'all aware that there is a blind spot in our vision where cells migrate in and out of the eye and that our mind "fills in" that spot? It's really weird how much our mind tricks us in order to keep our idea of normal reality "normal". [Frown]

Like when you prick your finger with a pin (I can hear KL now: "or when you finger a prick!") it takes an amount of time for that nerve signal to reach your brain, but your mind tricks you into experiencing the pain at the exact time you are pricked. [Cool]

KE

[ April 05, 2005, 03:47 PM: Message edited by: KnightEnder ]
 
Posted by simplybiological (Member # 1344) on :
 
yep. your eyes are always moving, just a smidge, to compensate for your blind spot.

i really hate when you stub your toe, and you know you stubbed it, and you have that split second waiting for the ouch that you know is coming.

did you also know that your ears emit sound? my dad has a gadget that measures it.
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
There was a good X-File where a Vietnam POW had learned to move in the blind spot and render himself invisible.

Is that what you hear when you are lying quiet on a pillow?

I stumped my toe on a barbell beside my bed yesterday and waited for that pain and it didn't come. I must have hit it just right or something. But I know what you mean, I was expecting it.

KE

[ April 05, 2005, 04:01 PM: Message edited by: KnightEnder ]
 
Posted by cperry (Member # 1938) on :
 
I am blind in one eye: 15% of the central vision field, in a shape kind of like a cornucopia. I used to be aware of it a lot, when it first happened. Now I hardly notice it at all. (But boy, is it a great excuse for why I can't catch anything people throw at me -- keys, balls, etc. Never could catch, but at least now I have a good excuse!)
 
Posted by javelin (Member # 1284) on :
 
cperry - I'm getting tired of saying this, but stop stealing my life and my posts, dammit! (aka, me too, exactly) [Smile]

[ April 05, 2005, 04:15 PM: Message edited by: javelin ]
 
Posted by Funean (Member # 2345) on :
 
SB,

Yah, otoacoustic emissions! They can use those to determine whether infants have hearing loss at birth, so they can be fitted with hearing aids right away. Apparently there is a "normal" range of these emissions, and deviations tell them to what degree something is wrong. They are teeny, tiny, eensy weensy little sounds. I often wonder how they discovered them. Was someone just listening *really* hard? [Smile]
 
Posted by Funean (Member # 2345) on :
 
I sent this link:

http://www.myspot.org/fallacies.html#1

to KnightEnder and he suggested I post it here, for the enjoyment of all.

For those of us who did not take logic in college, or were asleep because it was offered at 8 frikken o'clock in the morning (*cough*), but can still tell when *something* is wrong with an argument. We now can substantiate our criticism of one another's logic ("Hey, that's a flagrant #4!).
 
Posted by javelin (Member # 1284) on :
 
I can't see! I can't see! All I can see is red... argh.. thanks Funean and KE - I sense a plot, but I can't see it, 'cause all I see is RED.... *whine*
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
It was red?
 
Posted by Funean (Member # 2345) on :
 
[Eek!] yeah, the color format (red with white letters. what was he thinking?) is kind of heinous. I copied it to Word and stored it on my hard drive as a nice b&W document.
 
Posted by Funean (Member # 2345) on :
 
What, you didn't get red?
 
Posted by cperry (Member # 1938) on :
 
No way, Jav! Blind eye, bad catcher, or both??
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
No, I did. I was being a smartass. [Smile]

KE
 
Posted by Funean (Member # 2345) on :
 
D'oh!
 
Posted by lessismore (Member # 2092) on :
 
quote:
Like when you prick your finger with a pin (I can hear KL now: "or when you finger a prick!") it takes an amount of time for that nerve signal to reach your brain, but your mind tricks you into experiencing the pain at the exact time you are pricked.
Apparently consciousness lags the unconscious by a half second. Which is why the cowboy in the white hat always beats one in the black. The black hat consciously initiates while the white reacts.
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
Less,

Did you read "The User Illusion"?

KE
 
Posted by javelin (Member # 1284) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by cperry:
No way, Jav! Blind eye, bad catcher, or both??

Both - I lost my vision in my right eye when I was three, and my doctor told me I'd never have any depth perception (it's fine), but I constantly tell people that I have trouble tracking small, fast moving objects, thus I suck at catching [Smile] I was LITERALLY beginning to write the EXACT SAME POST when I read yours - DOH!

[ April 05, 2005, 05:16 PM: Message edited by: javelin ]
 
Posted by simplybiological (Member # 1344) on :
 
Wow, i'm surprised someone (besides me) knows the term "otoacoustic emissions"... i really should have been an audiologist, because i grew up with it and daddy always taught me what he was doing and how things worked- surely i would have been at the top of my class. i would bet a very large amount of money that the children of audiologists have some of the best monitered hearing of anyone- how many 12 year olds with normal hearing know what their audiogram looks like?

to my understanding, otoacoustic emissions are a byproduct of the action in the cochlea that results in you hearing... the diagnostic test is essentially a noise being played into your ear, and subsequently listening for something to come back, which would (i suppose) indicate that your cochlea is properly functioning with respect to the presented sound.

I don't really have trouble featuring the discovery of these, simply because hearing people love to stick stuff down in the ear (my dad's only book effort is about probe microphones) where it's not outlandish to imagine that they heard something.

KE, from what I know, what you hear when it's REALLY quiet is not otoacoustic emissions... It's a very low grade version of when your ears get the tonal ringing (tinnitus)... they really don't know a lot about what tinnitus is, but it's more to do with the brain/auditory nerve than actual mechanical workings of your ear. if you sit in an anechoic chamber you will hear a constant low-grade hum, which you normally don't notice because of the sounds around you. if your hearing is damaged suddenly, you may get tinnitus which (in one theory) is a result of your brain's attempt to "turn up the volume" because it can't hear as well.
personally, i had a scary bout of tinnitus that lasted almost a week that was associated with a sudden hearing drop of unknown origins... because daddy does what he does, i was put on oral steriods and probably saved a chunk of my hearing (note to everyone- if your hearing suddenly drops, DO NOT WAIT).

i should ask daddy about OAEs and see what he says...
 
Posted by cperry (Member # 1938) on :
 
I had a central retinal venal occlusion in my right eye -- at age 27. Tripped a lot at first, but adjusted.

Depth perception is okay, as I have peripheral vision. I only have problems with driving at night -- sometimes misread exactly where to turn on poorly lit country roads (but I've never ended up in a ditch!). I can even read the big E on the eye chart with my peripheral vision -- but nothing else (of course, it may be that I have it memorized!).
 
Posted by javelin (Member # 1284) on :
 
And that's pretty much what I've got left in my right eye - peripheral vision. I can't see the E, really, straight on. I don't have any damage on the eye itself - it seems that it's either in the nerve or in the brain.
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
SB,

Must be bed bugs, then.

KE
 
Posted by cperry (Member # 1938) on :
 
J - Yeah, I kind of have to look to the side to see the E, too.

Technically, I had a stroke. No reason why. Lucky it was venal, not arterial, and not worse.

[ April 05, 2005, 06:01 PM: Message edited by: cperry ]
 
Posted by Funean (Member # 2345) on :
 
SB,

I am nearly deaf in my left ear (90 dB loss), and have only half my hearing in my right (55 dB) due to viral infections in infancy. I am apparently a miracle as people with my degree of loss who don't get remediated right away (they didn't fit kids w/hearing aids until 4-5 in those days) have problems with language acquisition and speech. Evidently I shouldn't read above a 6th grade level and should have a serious mushmouth problem. Glad no one told me this as a kid.

I am a ridiculously knowledgeable and aggressive consumer of audiology. Fitting me with a new hearing aid is a nightmare, as I know exactly what I want, can back it up, and am not impressed with The Latest Thing on that basis alone. My guy uses me to train interns. [Smile]

KE--sometimes I can hear the blood flowing in my own ears at night. It's really annoying since my ears otherwise don't do much for me, really.
 
Posted by The Drake (Member # 2128) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by simplybiological:
I don't really have trouble featuring the discovery of these, simply because hearing people love to stick stuff down in the ear (my dad's only book effort is about probe microphones) where it's not outlandish to imagine that they heard something.

Huh. Small world. I started my career back in 1993 working on PC-based audiometers and in-ear measuring systems for Qualitone. Never read your Dad's book though. I was working on user-interfaces, device drivers, and application software.
 
Posted by kenmeer livermaile (Member # 2243) on :
 
"Like when you prick your finger with a pin (I can hear KL now: "or when you finger a prick!")"

Language, now, language. I am a reformed man. I would say: finger a penis.

's mo bettah that way, they say...
 
Posted by A. Alzabo (Member # 1197) on :
 
quote:
Language, now, language. I am a reformed man. I would say: finger a penis.

Ummmm...that doesn't seem quite right, either...
 
Posted by Funean (Member # 2345) on :
 
Somehow it's more....ickier that way.
 
Posted by cperry (Member # 1938) on :
 
way more ickier
 
Posted by The Drake (Member # 2128) on :
 
where is NetNanny when I need it... I must be protected from reading phrases like the above.
 
Posted by kenmeer livermaile (Member # 2243) on :
 
1. One who takes or advocates the taking of law enforcement into one's own hands.
2. A member of a vigilance committee.

[Spanish, watchman, vigilante, from Latin vigilāns, vigilant-, present participle of vigilāre, to be watchful, from vigil, watchful.]

vigilantes (vĭjĭlăn'tēz) , members of a vigilance committee. Such committees were formed in U.S. frontier communities to enforce law and order before a regularly constituted government could be established or have real authority. They were most common in mining communities, but were also known in cow towns and in farming settlements. The extreme penalty inflicted by the vigilantes was lynching. Among the most famous of the vigilante groups were those formed in San Francisco in 1851 and reorganized in 1856 to bring order to the notorious Barbary Coast. Measures taken by vigilance committees were at best extralegal. When such committees were formed in a community with a well-constituted government and a police force, they were strictly illegal and usually were merely the expression of mob violence.

sensationalism aside, seems the problem with the vigilantes si the problem with native Iraqi security: amateurism.

"All along the watchtower
Princes kept the view
While all the women came and went
Bare-foot servants to, but
Outside in the cold distance
A wild cat did growl
Two riders were approachin’
And the wind began to howl
Hey!"
 
Posted by lessismore (Member # 2092) on :
 
quote:
Did you read "The User Illusion"?
Yes it's a Great read
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
Yes it is. I thought you must have when you gave the gunfighter example. I've had to read it a couple of times to take it all in.

KE

[ April 06, 2005, 11:13 AM: Message edited by: KnightEnder ]
 
Posted by foliated (Member # 2041) on :
 
"No soy Dios, pero, casi..."
"¿Entonces quién eres?"

"Soy tu nuevo entrenador..."
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
"I am not God, but, almost..."

"I'm your new coach.." ?

What does all that mean?

KE

[ April 07, 2005, 01:11 AM: Message edited by: KnightEnder ]
 
Posted by Haggis (Member # 2114) on :
 
quote:
In the comic book, the pope dies and is reborn with superpowers beyond the infallibility Catholic doctrine gave him on Earth.

"He isn't John Paul II any more," Leon said. "From now on, he's the Incredible Popeman."

The Incredible Popeman?

Karol Wojtyla is a Pontiff trying to find a way to tap into the divine strength that no humans possess. Then, one night in his sanctum sanctorum, a prayer went wrong, causing him to be overexposed to the divine, Holy Light of God. Now, whenever angered or distressed, the mild-mannered scientist finds himself transforming into a powerful seven-foot creature with a big hat and sceptre known as The Incredible Popeman.

The Popeman is guided by Karol's personality, dealing with whatever distresses Karol. But unfortunately, Karol has no control over the creature's actions. Nor can he remember what he had done during his Popemanish states.

He travels around the Vatican in search of a cure, while taking various odd jobs under different aliases. During this odyssey, he tries to avoid the pursuit of investigative reporter Jack McGee, who suspects the Popeman of infallibility, and who is determined to discover the creature's true identity.
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
To the Pobemobile!

Surely the other religions must answer: Mormon Man! The Protestant Avenger!
The Incredible Southern Baptist Redneck Hulk! (You wouldn't like him when he's angry! Or any other time!)
Super Vishnu! BatBudha! Jewish GI Joe! Thor! no wait... The Hindu Hero! Spider Muhammad!
Captain Christian! He'll turn the other cheek, once! Don't make him go Old Testament on your ass!
And they can all be in groups (that'll be tricky); "The Religious Avengers!", "The Fantastic Faithful!", "The God Squad!",
"The Super Friends of God!"
I'm sure there are some more but I think I need sleep.

KE

[ April 07, 2005, 03:50 AM: Message edited by: KnightEnder ]
 
Posted by Haggis (Member # 2114) on :
 
Don't forget the rappin' super-hero Methodist Man.
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
I thought the rapper was Method Man? It was a toss up betwee Methodist Man and Mormon Man, so a nod to our LDS members. I left out the Pentacostal Power Twins! and the Cabala Kid!

KE
 
Posted by kenmeer livermaile (Member # 2243) on :
 
"I must be protected from reading phrases like the above."

I assume then you're one of those cocky fellows who doesn't hold when he aims but stands, arms akimbo, and shoots from the hip?
 
Posted by kenmeer livermaile (Member # 2243) on :
 
Mo' Mon, the Rastafarian Latter-Day Saint.
 
Posted by The Drake (Member # 2128) on :
 
At what point will the "Israel" thread achieve critical mass and kill us all?
 
Posted by kenmeer livermaile (Member # 2243) on :
 
"At what point will the "Israel" thread achieve critical mass and kill us all?"

It is channeling the Messiah via the Nine Billion Name-Callings of God method. When enough unwarranted epithets have been flung, we shall be delivered into a realm where people speak clearly, cleanly, precisely, and reserve invective innuendo for clearly de3clared personal weffrontery rather than as a supposed means of making their point.

Until then, we wander through the wilderness rading manna...
 
Posted by The Drake (Member # 2128) on :
 
Loved that Clarke story.
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
In case anyone hasn't noticed; we have a new forum here at OA. The Mod has been kind enough to give us our own area for The Ornery Writers Workshop
Everybody is welcome!

KE
 
Posted by simplybiological (Member # 1344) on :
 
guys, there's a partial solar eclipse this afternoon, if anyone is interested. happens in austin around 4:30, check your local listings. and don't look at the sun.
 
Posted by EDanaII (Member # 1062) on :
 
But it's so beautiful! ... Augh! My eyes! My eyes!!!
 
Posted by The Drake (Member # 2128) on :
 
Don't boss me. I'll look at the Sun if I want to.
 
Posted by FiredrakeRAGE (Member # 1224) on :
 
I'm about an hour north of the eclipse. Given that it's the last for several years, that's depressing.

--Firedrake
 
Posted by simplybiological (Member # 1344) on :
 
eclipse was nice... margaritas were nicer.

is it shallow or wrong that my major plan for the weekend is to hit on a particular bartender while i still can?
 
Posted by kenmeer livermaile (Member # 2243) on :
 
"hit on a particular bartender"

Ah, to be young, wanton, and willing...

u go gurl
 
Posted by simplybiological (Member # 1344) on :
 
bleah. i think it's destined to remain a strictly professional relationship with lots of winking, and me getting my drinks faster/stronger/with more cherries than everyone else... and really, all the double entendre is better than the make out would be. oof.

i hate when i get drunk AFTER i get home...
 
Posted by EDanaII (Member # 1062) on :
 
@ The Drake:
quote:
Don't boss me. I'll look at the Sun if I want to.
Kjlkaf afd adfad adkjfds i, adjkfa! Dlkfe adfj adfa dljfoe.

Ed (Desperately wishing he'd taken SB's advice).

[Wink]
 
Posted by simplybiological (Member # 1344) on :
 
daylight savings time totally screws me up.

i'm STILL AWAKE, people. not JUST WOKE UP. STILL AWAKE.

i am aware that it's just an hour, but the difference in when it gets dark just totally throws me... add that to the fact that i'm a night owl and i'm perpetually worn out from grad school/TA/superhero duties, and i get all fubared.
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
I'm in the same boat SB.

On the subject of staying fit. I started working out again about a month ago, just 30 minutes a day and I've already taken two inches off my waist and put a half inch on my bicepts. It's amazing what a little bit a day can do. Now if I can only kick Cokes. Stacy says I shouldn't since I like them so much and I'm not happy unless I'm trying to improve something about myself. Do I talk about Stacy a lot?

KE

[ April 10, 2005, 07:36 AM: Message edited by: KnightEnder ]
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
Anyone know how they caught that Rudolph guy that bombed the Olympics? And did that security guard they blamed it on ever get any money?

KE
 
Posted by cperry (Member # 1938) on :
 
Okay, KE, this is even weirder. I've been nagging Tom for years to dump the sodas (his poison of choice is Dr. Pepper, but he'll drink Coke if DP is not available). He has finally (I think -- it's not like cigarettes or booze on the breath) kicked the habit and is now only addicted to Gatorade.

Tell Stacy to keep bugging you until you start getting healthier. Adult onset diabetes would be a real bummer for you.
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
Don't you have to be overweight to get that? And I only drink about two liters a day. [Frown] The worst part is it's rotting my teeth. I've had four root canals and caps because of Coke. Six if you count the two I got because of baseball. Root canals suck.

Oh, and I do have a history of diabetes in my family, does that matter?

KE

[ April 10, 2005, 10:31 AM: Message edited by: KnightEnder ]
 
Posted by simplybiological (Member # 1344) on :
 
CP- gatorade is still REALLY sugary. it's actually not that much better than soda.

i will remain addicted to diet coke until I DIE.

i was working out ALL THE TIME in the fall, and then in february i got this cough (i called it "the consumption," though it later turned out to allergy related) and it screwed me up royally for working out... now i'm having to get back in the habit all over again and it sucks. it doesn't help that my friends are cheese addicts and happy hour food is notorious for putting these pesky 5 points on one's waistline.

i'm having this nose problem... i'm not having any other allergy symptoms, but my nose keeps getting all weird. it's not a big deal except that right inside my right nostril, there's this spot that stings like crazy if i touch it- i've had it for a couple weeks... i would feel like a dork going to the doctor and being like, "i have a nasal issue" but really... wtf?
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
I've been having that exact same problem in the exact same place. Annoying as hell. Must be allergies.

KE
 
Posted by FiredrakeRAGE (Member # 1224) on :
 
SimplyBiological -

I believe caffeine (which is in Dr. Pepper) can really increase chance and/or level of hypoglycemia. While Gatoraid is probably not much better, it does have that factor going for it.

(I'm not railing against caffeine - I drink Code Red [Smile] )

--Firedrake
 
Posted by The Drake (Member # 2128) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by simplybiological:
daylight savings time totally screws me up.

You know what's worse? Staying up all night, going to sleep when it is light out, waking up in total darkness - well rested.

Someday, I'm going to have to travel north and experience a week of Darkness in the winter, and a week of Light in the summer.
 
Posted by kenmeer livermaile (Member # 2243) on :
 
"i am aware that it's just an hour, but the difference in when it gets dark just totally throws me..."

Fortunately for me, middle age has made sleep a simple matter of lying down, giving my brain a spin, and collapsing into the vortex.

But I still HATE having the clocks bumped. It's not all bad, though. IN the fall, I DESPISE the sudden lowering of the evening curtain one hour sooner just when that lingering hour of twilight is most valuable.

But in spring, there's a magic in twilight the first few weeks after the clocks lurch forward. Sort of a compensation for that sudden imposition of wintry gloom.

"it's not a big deal except that right inside my right nostril, there's this spot that stings like crazy if i touch it- i've had it for a couple weeks... i would feel like a dork going to the doctor and being like, "i have a nasal issue" but really... wtf?"

If it's been going on for weeks it's probably worth a trip to the doc... if you know a GOOD one.
 
Posted by simplybiological (Member # 1344) on :
 
my problem with the clock thing is that i tend to wait until the sun goes down to lurch into homework mode... typically i come home between 4 and 5, muck about for a while, and when it gets dark i get back to what i need to do... however, when it suddenly doesn't get dark until 8, i find myself ACK way behind where i need to be.

last night i was supposed to call ryan (this guy i'm seeing) when i was feeling moved to go out, and i called him at NINE FIFTEEN because i felt like it was about 7. having my date not start until after 10 greatly facilitates the up-til-6am thing.

right now i'm so frustrated with the woman i teach for that i'm really to kill. stab stab stab. arg.
 
Posted by cperry (Member # 1938) on :
 
We must be in the twilight zone: I've had this thing going on in my right nostril for a month now.

Gatorade has about 1/2 the calories as a soda, no caffeine. Plus, it doesn't come in aluminum cans.

You can get diabetes without being overweight. Adult onset, as I understand it, happens when your pancreas just stops being able to handle the sugar load.

Anyway, it's a thought.
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
Kindred souls and noses.

Bummer. Thanks for the warning. One more good reason to quit. I wish I liked water.

I just saw that show on the Replicator, that is amazing.

KE
 
Posted by EDanaII (Member # 1062) on :
 
Hmmm... Maybe you guys have contracted some form of "orneryitis?"

Ed.
 
Posted by The Drake (Member # 2128) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by EDanaII:
Hmmm... Maybe you guys have contracted some form of "orneryitis?"

Ed.

Just to be safe, wear condoms on your fingers when posting.
 
Posted by simplybiological (Member # 1344) on :
 
my best friend keeps telling people i have nasal gonorrhea, because she thinks that's just soooo funny. perhaps all our noses had sex?

i keep trying not to poke at it, but it's hard! last night i stuck ice chips up my nose cause it was stinging so bad (incidentally, that felt pretty good).

have you seen those finger condom things? those are just... just funny.
 
Posted by kenmeer livermaile (Member # 2243) on :
 
"nasal gonorrhea... i keep trying not to poke at it, but it's hard!"

Innuendo strikes again!
 
Posted by kenmeer livermaile (Member # 2243) on :
 
When I was a kid you had to tie a string to a Junebug to do this:

Remote Control Bugs

"Researchers have found a way to direct fruit flies’ behavior by shining laser light on them, the first time scientists have exercised wireless remote control over animals.

"The researchers made the flies jump, beat their wings, and fly on command by triggering genetic “remote controls” that they had installed in the insects’ brains. The research is published in the April 8 issue of the research journal Cell."
 
Posted by OpsanusTau (Member # 2350) on :
 
quote:
have you seen those finger condom things?
Yeah, they're great. Have you been using them to put your finger up your nose?
 
Posted by cperry (Member # 1938) on :
 
Hey y'all, I go under the knife at 4pm edt on April 14. Send me postive thoughts, good karma, your prayers--if you're the type. I'd really appreciate it. (Not that I'm nervous or anything.)
 
Posted by javelin (Member # 1284) on :
 
You got it.
 
Posted by Funean (Member # 2345) on :
 
Me too!
 
Posted by witless chum (Member # 1643) on :
 
Anyone like to hand out some things to do in Chicago reccomendations?

My wife and I are heading their for a weekend and we're planning on museum/aquarium type stuff, but any smaller things we really should see?

Thanks,
Dan
 
Posted by The Drake (Member # 2128) on :
 
Post 1000 coming up... I just know I'm going to miss the big event, just like when my first car rolled over to 100,000. I was driving along, looked down at 100000.5 and almost drove into a ditch. I can't believe I missed the wonderous event of all those nines getting sucked up into the dashboard...
 
Posted by simplybiological (Member # 1344) on :
 
ugh. i picked up an insect today that juiced some delicious fluids on me, and now my hands have a severe funk that i would describe as somewhere between poo and stagnant water. it's gonna take a spell to wear off, methinks.

these are the days of my life.

the smell is really inhibiting my enjoying of dinner, though.
 
Posted by kenmeer livermaile (Member # 2243) on :
 
"Anyone like to hand out some things to do in Chicago reccomendations?"

If it's a weekend, the Shedd Aquarium and Field Museum will more than fill your time. But you can always take in an evening under the indoor stars of the Adler Planetarium... and get yourself a Chicago style hot dog. They're good.
 
Posted by simplybiological (Member # 1344) on :
 
i think my nose affliction is gone, it's given way to truly spectacular booger production.

everyone totally wanted to know that
 
Posted by Funean (Member # 2345) on :
 
It's your body's helpful effort to protectively coat the stingy place. If my experiences in this area are anything to judge by, this stage will go on for weeks, until you are ready to hack your nose off with a cheese slicer.

It's been a long winter.
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
CPerry, you know you have mine. Let us know how you are as soon as you can.

Witless, if you go to Wrigleyville the people in the bars there are really friendly. It was like being in Cheers.

SB, my nose is better today too. But I don't have boogers, ever.

KE
 
Posted by foliated (Member # 2041) on :
 
Chicago recommendations. All info is as of mid 1998, so ymmv.

When I lived there, one of my favorite things to do was to ride a bike along the lake. There's a bike path that goes from about the 60's on the south side all the way to ... well into the north side, almost Evanston. If memory serves, there are several bike rental places downtown. They might be opening up now that the weather is getting good. And the part near the center of the city is very nice. If there isn't a place to get a bike, you can always walk part of it, too.


Don't forget the deep-dish pizza - my favorite was from Giordano's - so thick, a single slice was basically a meal. I suggest pineapple and canadian bacon as your toppings, but lots of other things are good, too.

what else?

The Smart Museum at the University of Chicago - very small, but very nice. Also the Oriental Institute a couple of blocks away.

The water tower at the north end of the magnificent mile. The mile itself, however didn't impress me too much.

Then there's the "views from tall buildings" - the John Hancock building at the north end of the magnificent mile, and the Sears Tower ... somewhere near the main Post Office/Train station.

Since you're going there for a weekend, dim sum in Chinatown in the morning (roughly Wentworth and Cermak.) The lines can get really long, so maybe it's good to get there as early as feasible, and to ask around to find a good restaurant to go to.

They have boat tours that start on the river, near where Michigan Avenue crosses the Chicago River. (You go to the bridge and walk down). You can see a lot of stuff from the boats.

Wow, thanks for the trip down memory lane! [Smile] I hope you enjoy your stay.
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
Drake,

1,000 Congratulations!

KE

[ April 14, 2005, 05:54 PM: Message edited by: KnightEnder ]
 
Posted by The Drake (Member # 2128) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by KnightEnder:
Drake,

1,000 Congratulations!

KE

Dang, I missed it. Now I'll never know what my 1000th post was.
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
Yeah you can. Just count back posts down the thread list, or using the time stamps.

KE
 
Posted by javelin (Member # 1284) on :
 
Anyone else wondering how cperry is doing?
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
Anybody know exactly what procedure she was having done?

KE
 
Posted by cperry (Member # 1938) on :
 
Heya, I'm back! (get it -- back?)

So, Thursday at 2:30pm, I registered at the hospital, rolled into the operating room at 4pm, took 3 deep breaths of oxygen, (apparently had the scheduled hemilaminectomy), woke up at 5:30 in recovery, said hi to my surgeon and anesthesiologist, rolled up to my room at 6pm (actually, we raced with another patient going up to our room -- and my gurney won), chatted with my mom and hubby for awhile, finally walked to the bathroom (standing up straight!) and peed at 7:30, and left at 8pm.

I had a herniated L5-S1 that had kept me home from work, pretty much flat on my back, since March 11.

I hope to be back at work on Monday! It's amazing!

Thanks for your positive vibes. I really really do appreciate them. I've had surgery before, but not since my stroke (when I was 27), and I was a bit nervous.

Happy happy! [Smile]
 
Posted by Funean (Member # 2345) on :
 
Hooray! Sounds like everything went fabulously. My dad suffered with 2 herniated discs for something like 10 years before he finally gave in and had them fused. It's a nightmare and I'm so glad yours were repairable.
 
Posted by cperry (Member # 1938) on :
 
Funean - fusing is a lot more serious. They just had to trim some disc. I have 3 other herniated discs, but we're hoping they don't cause me any serious problems. I can't imagine how so many people spend so much of their lives in pain. It just boggles my mind.
 
Posted by kenmeer livermaile (Member # 2243) on :
 
"i think my nose affliction is gone, it's given way to truly spectacular booger production.
everyone totally wanted to know that
"

It was worth just to see the words "truly spectacular booger production" in just that order.

Madame Perry: it's good to see you back. I was distracted by the swallowing of a teaspoon or so of blood every minute all yesterday, so I failed to send a prayer you way at the designated time.

But I thought of you this morning.

My wife had 3 cervical vertebrae fused last July. That flat on your back stuff gets way way way way way way way way way way way way OLD........

And now, ladies and gentlemen, for your amazement, simplybiological and her sequined-millipede (or whatever it is) will demonstrate her truly spectacular boogers...
 
Posted by cperry (Member # 1938) on :
 
Thanks, KL, for the thoughts this am. I was actually at my worst pain this morning, so you probably helped.

I'm with you on the "way..." old business. Though I imagine swallowing teaspoonfuls of blood every minute also gets a bit tedious.
 
Posted by kenmeer livermaile (Member # 2243) on :
 
"Though I imagine swallowing teaspoonfuls of blood every minute also gets a bit tedious."

It wouldn't have been so bad except that the blood, apparently, triggered some wicked reaction with the lingering remnants of a sore throat that is the hallmark of the New Flu in these parts of late.

Every time I swallow, it feels like someone jabs a popsicle stick in my glottis.

I suspect my thoughts didn't do any good at the time (your wicked AM pain) but it's always nice to hear that folks give a cahoot, eh?
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
Cperry, I'm glad everything turned out well for you.

KL, I hope you get to feeling better. Are you taking anything for it? Is there nothing that makes it more beareable? Like popsicles for instance? Or honey with whiskey, that seems to help everything? Or does anyone know a home-remedy that would help KL?

I can't believe I'm saying this, but we need a "prayer" emoticon.

Edited to add: And yes it is great to have people who care. I have to give a nod to our friends over at AI-Jane, they, and the people here, were great when I was going through my job problems awhile back. [Smile]

KE

[ April 17, 2005, 11:30 AM: Message edited by: KnightEnder ]
 
Posted by kenmeer livermaile (Member # 2243) on :
 
Popsicles require swallowing. Honey-whiskey might help insofar as alcohol is anesthetical. The codeine cough syrup is good stuff; it takes the edge off so it becomes an annoying pain rather than an exasperating pain.

A prayer emoticon would be aptly be 2 hands held together. The clasping of hands is an old gestural symbol meaning 'my hands are bound before thee Lord'.

I'm a big fan of plecebo effects. And powerful drugs. The two combined are mighty mighty.
 
Posted by Funean (Member # 2345) on :
 
KL,

You can get your pharmacist to mix you up a gargle of benzocaine. I don't know if a scrip is needed or not; my pediatrician dashed off a recipe when my son had wicked post-tonsillitis pain and the surgeon had only provided tylenol with codeine, which was making him sleep all the time whilst not really relieving the pain.

I think it had benzocaine, a wee bit of peroxide, flavor and maybe soda water. The big benefit is you don't have to swallow (and shouldn't!), while it provides blissful numbing without paralysis.
 
Posted by cperry (Member # 1938) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by kenmeer livermaile:
I suspect my thoughts didn't do any good at the time (your wicked AM pain) but it's always nice to hear that folks give a cahoot, eh?

I have no proof, and I'm certainly no expert, but my life experiences have suggested to me that, despite the cliche, there is power in positive thinking. I'd just as soon have a lot of happy thoughts headed my way than anything else.

Therefore, I shall concentrate on sending you some positive, no-pain-in-the-throat vibes. (If nothing else, it makes ME feel as if I'm doing something positive in this mad mad world.)
 
Posted by cperry (Member # 1938) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by KnightEnder:
Cperry, I'm glad everything turned out well for you....I can't believe I'm saying this, but we need a "prayer" emoticon.

Thanks, KE. I really like your prayer emoticon idea. And prayer doesn't have to be religious, so it's not so off the wall for you to have thought of it!
 
Posted by kenmeer livermaile (Member # 2243) on :
 
"it provides blissful numbing without paralysis."

WHAT!!??!! No PARALYSIS!!??!! We wuz ROBBED! [Wink]

The throat thing has been abating since this AM. It's fading to a moderate annoyance.

Sending thoughts via emal works real good, methinks.
 
Posted by potemkyn (Member # 1040) on :
 
<Potemkyn strolls in wondering what this thread is about>

<He obviously comes in half way through a strange converstation and starts slowly backing out the door hoping no one will notice.>
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
Too late! Potemkyn get back in here! All the conversations in here are weird. That's the point. Stick around awhile and we'll suck you into one. But, seriously this is a place to say hey and discuss casual things that might not be worthy of a whole thread or just ask how somebody or everybody is doing. Or send prayers for somebody, like CPerry, during her recent surgery, or help another member with a home remedy, like Fun did recently for KL.

This is kinda like the OA crackerbarrel that our "village" sits around and shoots the breeze. And everybody is welcome, especially you.

KE
 
Posted by cperry (Member # 1938) on :
 
Yeah, Potemkyn. It's here at the miscellaneous thread that Simplybio and I found we shared a deep appreciation for 7-11 sandwiches. I mean, where else would something magical like that happen?!
 
Posted by kenmeer livermaile (Member # 2243) on :
 
"I mean, where else would something magical like that happen?!"

There were buns on the grill
But we never smelled them toasting
No we never smelt them at all
Till we ate two...
 
Posted by potemkyn (Member # 1040) on :
 
hmmm...

I don't know. My small talk is generally pretty weak. I don't stay up to date on anything that most people find relevant, and I refuse to talk for the sake of talking, so this might not work out.

The other problem is that my pop culture skills are atrocious, so I feel that I'll probably only make a weak addition to the misc. roster.

But I'll keep an eye out.
 
Posted by potemkyn (Member # 1040) on :
 
see...um...yeah...

maybe I'm not cool enough, but I have no idea what kenmeer is saying right now. No clue.

What am I supposed to do in this case? Write counter-prose?

I put the pickle in the microwave
It seemed smart at the time
Sadly eating it made me crazy
And made me burst into rhyme...
 
Posted by simplybiological (Member # 1344) on :
 
pickles glow if you hook them up to an electrical source.


cp- new sandwich- turkey and pepperoni on tomato basil bread with some sort of feta spread. it's in the higher cost bracket though....
 
Posted by Funean (Member # 2345) on :
 
SB,

A friend of mine once told me that frogs turn themselves inside out if you put bleach on them. I have the same question for you that I had for her wrt the pickles:

How does one happen upon this sort of discovery?

(NB: the frog thing was a laundry accident. No intentional animal torture here.)
 
Posted by EDanaII (Member # 1062) on :
 
quote:
How does one happen upon this sort of discovery?
Boredom?

Ed.
 
Posted by cperry (Member # 1938) on :
 
How does a frog turn itself inside out?

Potemkyn - Nice quatrain. Has a pleasant sweet-sour appeal to it.
 
Posted by kenmeer livermaile (Member # 2243) on :
 
How does a frog turn itself inside out?
Does it push itself out from within?
Does it grip with its mandible some kind of handle
That puts guts where once there was skin?

"maybe I'm not cool enough, but I have no idea what kenmeer is saying right now. No clue."

As if anyone else does? Around here I'm the Delphic Booracle.
 
Posted by Funean (Member # 2345) on :
 
Oh, bravo, kenmeer. Just....bravo.

I think you should run for OA Poet Laureate. Ornreate?
 
Posted by Funean (Member # 2345) on :
 
I'm trying to come up with the "NO, a frog doesn't." part, but failing. Rats.
 
Posted by kenmeer livermaile (Member # 2243) on :
 
Or does it exhale from deep in itself
So deeply its innards evert?
While the vacuum within sucks up its green skin
As its anus lets in a loud burp?
 
Posted by kenmeer livermaile (Member # 2243) on :
 
And now the household juke plays the original 'Milestones'... 1958 was really a marvelous year. 1955 to 1965 was the high-water decade mark for American culture, in my not at all humble opinion.

[ April 19, 2005, 01:23 PM: Message edited by: kenmeer livermaile ]
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
When I was six-years-old I saw a frog turned inside out. The neighbor kids were putting firecrackers in their mouths and lightning them. I was horrified. Me and my sister went around that night and rounded up all the forgs we could find, put them in my football helmet and brought them to our room for safety. They all escaped during the night. Luckily my mom is a big-time animal lover and was proud of us, rather than upset when she found fifty frogs hopping around the house the next morning. [Smile]

KE

[ April 19, 2005, 03:04 PM: Message edited by: KnightEnder ]
 
Posted by cperry (Member # 1938) on :
 
Yuck. I've never heard of such stuff. I guess I lived a sheltered childhood. Maybe it's part of being a girl and a bookworm. Used to catch lizards but would never have even had the firecrackers around, much less thought of putting them in some poor critter's mouth.

KE - Your mom's my hero.

KL - Great verse. I like the last line of the 2nd quatrain. Much fun.
 
Posted by cperry (Member # 1938) on :
 
.kniht I ,sdrawkcab m’I” .dekaeuqs eh “!on hO”
.niks saw ecno tahw si gniees m’I siht lla oS
?tuo era sedisni ym that ,neht, naem siht seoD
“.tuop ot tnaw I fi -- traf tsum I sseug I
 
Posted by kenmeer livermaile (Member # 2243) on :
 
Oh, it's real cute, Miz Perry, and I like watching it sashay more'n most men, I reckon, entering as I am into my pre-dirtyoldmanopause, but showing it off like that is just gonna mess them discs up again.

How DO you walk into a room backwards like that, luv?

Showoff... (adopting Goober Pyle voice): 'Do it agin! Do it agin!'

[ April 19, 2005, 10:01 PM: Message edited by: kenmeer livermaile ]
 
Posted by The Drake (Member # 2128) on :
 
You've heard of the Zombie Thread - when the original point is debunked, withdrawn, or otherwise moot. Then, it is inhabited by one of the argument-loops that lurk about. "Does God Exist?" for example.

Now we're witnessing the Brain Dead Thread, (World without Israel), where no original points are being made, but whose life is artificially supported by one or two participants who maintain the autonomous argument functions of the thread -- unnaturally extending its life.

What other types of Threads are there?

The Possessed Thread - where an argument-loop comes in and takes over an otherwise healthy thread.

The Gibberish Thread - we all know and love this one don't we? (ORMUS) The original post is so bizarre, that an argument vacuum occurs.

Anybody got other ones?
 
Posted by kenmeer livermaile (Member # 2243) on :
 
"Now we're witnessing the Brain Dead Thread, (World without Israel), where no original points are being made, but whose life is artificially supported by one or two participants who maintain the autonomous argument functions of the thread -- unnaturally extending its life."

You speak of threads as if they were something more than a topicalized locale for chatter.

'Original' points? Autnonomous argument function?

Sometimes things grow quiet in the club as things are studied in depth.

Personally, I think folks on fora are more focused on the act of debate itself rather than the illumination or edification or simple entertainment human beings enjoy via discourse.
 
Posted by simplybiological (Member # 1344) on :
 
i just downloaded soulseek and now i'm on a fury of music downloading, calling to mind one sad weekend in 2000 where i didn't leave the apt until i had downloaded the entirety of the monster ballads collection.

in other news, if i have to make ONE MORE SODDING POWERPOINT presentation imma kick someone's teeth in.
 
Posted by The Drake (Member # 2128) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by kenmeer livermaile:
You speak of threads as if they were something more than a topicalized locale for chatter.

I'm only pontificating on the validity of establishing a taxonomy relating to the structure of a written discussion. Much as a play is different from a short story, novel, or poem. That some of my proposed terms are tongue-in-cheek, does not diminish the scholarly bent of my hypothesis...
 
Posted by Funean (Member # 2345) on :
 
The Serendipitous Thread, wherein the topic title no longer matches the topic of the lively discussion therein, admidst the occasional call for a thread re-name.

The Orphan Thread, wherein someone posts a topic that has already been thoroughly covered farther down the board, and the replies all consist of some variety of "this was covered in XYZ thread."

The Life-Support Thread, wherein a DNR was not issued, and every so often someone posts a one liner (like a relevant headline), briefly shocking to life an otherwise dead thread, which then flatlines again.
 
Posted by cperry (Member # 1938) on :
 
KL - Hey, I even drove my little sportscar today and was able to disembark (can you do that from a car) without flashing the world or falling on my face! [Cool] So I'm thinking that pretending to be an inside-out frog is no longer a dangerous undertaking, yllacisyhp tsael ta.
 
Posted by Haggis (Member # 2114) on :
 
CP: No Da Vinci Code for you. One Year!
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
The Apocalypse Thread -- Where two opposing posters take over the thread and disrupt it in a fight to the end.

KE
 
Posted by kenmeer livermaile (Member # 2243) on :
 
Drake:

Please let me apologize. My comments last night came from some sudden bile vent bearing no relation to your comments but to, perhaps, their touching upon some old offense or frustration. This apology is no excuse. I knew I was being petty at the time I sent it.

Temporary insanity? Indeed, I noticed last night as I drifted asleep that my normal ‘dream logic’ was fractured, as if something were editing the usual semirational nonsense in preference for another form of semirational nonsense.

So I literally have no idea where that came from but recognize my mess when I make it. Sorry.

Kenmeer
 
Posted by A. Alzabo (Member # 1197) on :
 
quote:
in other news, if i have to make ONE MORE SODDING POWERPOINT presentation imma kick someone's teeth in.
I feel like that about watching one more Powerpoint presentation...

[ April 20, 2005, 11:41 AM: Message edited by: A. Alzabo ]
 
Posted by The Drake (Member # 2128) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by kenmeer livermaile:
Drake:

Please let me apologize... I knew I was being petty at the time I sent it.

heh, no worries. I had many of the same thoughts as I was writing it, which is why it wound up here in Misc. instead of a normal thread.
 
Posted by kenmeer livermaile (Member # 2243) on :
 
"I'm only pontificating on the validity of establishing a taxonomy relating to the structure of a written discussion. Much as a play is different from a short story, novel, or poem. That some of my proposed terms are tongue-in-cheek, does not diminish the scholarly bent of my hypothesis..."

This paragraph reminds me of the pedantic obscurity of which I was so (welcomely) accused yesterday. Depending on response to it, it can proceed to take/make itself (more) seriously or to proceed to be only an 'obscure joke'. It's rather like raw rhetorical DNA...
 
Posted by potemkyn (Member # 1040) on :
 
Kenmeer,

My apologizes for the connection, but as I read what you had written, I instantly thought of this site. Don't ask why, I'm not 100% sure. I got a big kick out of it though.

http://www.aldaily.com/bwc.htm

quote:
The move from a structuralist account in which capital is understood to structure social relations in relatively homologous ways to a view of hegemony in which power relations are subject to repetition, convergence, and rearticulation brought the question of temporality into the thinking of structure, and marked a shift from a form of Althusserian theory that takes structural totalities as theoretical objects to one in which the insights into the contingent possibility of structure inaugurate a renewed conception of hegemony as bound up with the contingent sites and strategies of the rearticulation of power.

 
Posted by kenmeer livermaile (Member # 2243) on :
 
"a renewed conception of hegemony as bound up with the contingent sites and strategies of the rearticulation of power."

Wow. It takes all kinds, don't it? Best I can read it, it says that sometimes one buncha peoples just ups and grabs a bunch of stuff and calls it the new regime?
 
Posted by Funean (Member # 2345) on :
 
I like "the contingent possibility of structure."
 
Posted by A. Alzabo (Member # 1197) on :
 
KL:
quote:
It's rather like raw rhetorical DNA...
Raw rhetorical DNA? Given the origins of so much Western rhetorical tradition, you might say "the GATTACA from Attica!"

Or maybe you'd be more laconic...naaahhh.

[ April 20, 2005, 11:27 PM: Message edited by: A. Alzabo ]
 
Posted by A. Alzabo (Member # 1197) on :
 
quote:
Now we're witnessing the Brain Dead Thread, (World without Israel), where no original points are being made, but whose life is artificially supported by one or two participants who maintain the autonomous argument functions of the thread -- unnaturally extending its life.

Sounds kinda like the Isreal/Palestine conflict itself...
 
Posted by kenmeer livermaile (Member # 2243) on :
 
"I like "the contingent possibility of structure.""

Like an unopened box of Tinker Toys.
 
Posted by The Drake (Member # 2128) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by A. Alzabo:
quote:
Now we're witnessing the Brain Dead Thread, (World without Israel), where no original points are being made, but whose life is artificially supported by one or two participants who maintain the autonomous argument functions of the thread -- unnaturally extending its life.

Sounds kinda like the Isreal/Palestine conflict itself...
True that...
 
Posted by cperry (Member # 1938) on :
 
"The move from a structuralist account in which capital is understood to structure social relations in relatively homologous ways to a view of hegemony in which power relations are subject to repetition, convergence, and rearticulation brought the question of temporality into the thinking of structure, and marked a shift from a form of Althusserian theory that takes structural totalities as theoretical objects to one in which the insights into the contingent possibility of structure inaugurate a renewed conception of hegemony as bound up with the contingent sites and strategies of the rearticulation of power."

Did anyone else notice her extraneous comma? Geez.
 
Posted by Haggis (Member # 2114) on :
 
That sentence should be taken out and shot.
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
An excellent article on "American What Unites Us and Keeps Us Together ", for your perusal. It would probably make a good thread BUT it is hard to read so beware. However, I read it and it was worth it.


KE

[ April 21, 2005, 04:12 PM: Message edited by: KnightEnder ]
 
Posted by kenmeer livermaile (Member # 2243) on :
 
"Did anyone else notice her extraneous comma? Geez."

And that dress... TACKY.
 
Posted by simplybiological (Member # 1344) on :
 
happy birthday to everard.
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
Happy Birthday Ev!

Dang, that would have been a perfect post for my 3000th.

KE
 
Posted by Haggis (Member # 2114) on :
 
Yay! Happy birthday!
 
Posted by Funean (Member # 2345) on :
 
Hippo Birdy, Ev!
 
Posted by Funean (Member # 2345) on :
 
Hey, I finally dragged myself through the article KE recommended upthread and it was worth it. Though the formatting is inexcusable. Sort of like an e.e. cummings poem, without the yumminess.

KE, I'd argue that the primary glue holding all us disparate, yea, ornery Americans together is simply an abiding and renewable decision to do just that. A friend of mine, not American, once pointed out that we are at our best when the worst happens...all the differences disappear and we all see the underlying brotherhood. She observed this before 911, but that was a perfect illustration. Too bad this sense spends more time latent than active, but it's always there.
 
Posted by Funean (Member # 2345) on :
 
quote:
Like an unopened box of Tinker Toys.
KL, that was for you. I was counting on you to come up with the analogy, and once again, you have not let me down.
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
Cause we'll all stick together
And you can take that to the bank

That's the Cowboys and the Hippies
The Rebels and the Yanks!

It needs a line about liberals and conservatives.

KE
 
Posted by kidzmom (Member # 2015) on :
 
I'm Ba-a-a-a-a-a-ck!! (Yes,Ken-baby, and front, too!) Not that I think many folks noticed...*sniffs, peeks up through lowered eyelashes*

Anyway, you may take a brief moment, if you wish, to commiserate with and congratulate me on surviving AN ENTIRE 4 WEEKS with NO computer!! Ack... exactly 28 days ago, the hard drive had the incredibly bad manners to kick the bucket, cash in its chips, and go down for the count. It's taken me until now to get a semi-functional machine back, and boy did I miss you crazy kids! Well, most of...some of...aw, heck--after this long, I think I really did miss everybody! [Razz] So--what'd I miss? Anything interesting? [Big Grin]
 
Posted by kenmeer livermaile (Member # 2243) on :
 
Baby's got back.

I noticed, kizma'am. But I didn't say nuthin'. Didn't want to give folks the idea that you and I were, uh, you know.

I'z gonna write a dirty limerick, right now, jest for YOU:

There once was a lovely home teacher,
Whose husband was Christ's favorite preacher.
But when he gave sermon
She'd grab hold his herman
And man was she ever a screecher!

'twere the best I could do on such short notice of a late Saturday night. Goose a goatie for me, huh? I miss milking goats.

[ April 23, 2005, 01:45 AM: Message edited by: kenmeer livermaile ]
 
Posted by cperry (Member # 1938) on :
 
Welcome back, Kidzmom. I wondered if it was some kind of goat issue. Very good to hear from you!
 
Posted by kidzmom (Member # 2015) on :
 
cperry-- TY! "Goat issues" [Eek!] LOL sounds a little....hmm! But yes, we have had a few--3 sets of triplets, 2 sets of twins, 1 single birth (one triplet was stillborn [Frown] ) . My hands have been places and done things I never dreamed of as a Liberal Arts type in college! Still waiting on 2 does who seem to have decided they don't want to "do" labor!

Kenmeer--Ah'm deeply...ummm...honored... And since one bad limerick deserves another, here are THREE, just for you! AHEM...

Most probably quite irredeemable,
Though good-natured and sometimes amenable,
Is our dear buddy Ken
Of the lasvcious grin,
To whom any phrase is "obscene-able"!

Innuendo's a favorite ploy,
Conundrums his pride and his joy,
The double entendre
Is his favorite way
To baffle, confound and annoy.

Our brains' response time he tries
With his sharp wit and snappy replies;
He's irreverent and funny
And when he gets punny,
He thrills at our tormented cries!

*muah*
Back to you!
*ducks and runs before people start throwing things* [Razz]
 
Posted by simplybiological (Member # 1344) on :
 
ooooh i just realized that there's a feature on the profile page where i can adjust the forum to local time.

i'm pretty sure this wasn't there like, a year ago.

no more posts in the future.
 
Posted by cperry (Member # 1938) on :
 
"Still waiting on 2 does who seem to have decided they don't want to "do" labor!"

Having watched my daughter give birth, I do understand that no matter how wonderful and beautiful birth is, there may be an element of "well, maybe not right now...how 'bout I just wait and do this later?" to the whole process. Funny, though, that animals might feel that way too.
 
Posted by kenmeer livermaile (Member # 2243) on :
 
Stillest of songs is the night.
Softest of chants is the dark.
Nocturnal sonances seem,
By contrast, cuthroat and stark.
Cat's eyes save their brightest gleam
For poaching mice in the park.

See? I only wax smutty because, well, someone's got to do it. But I'm really a softy aesthete at heart. I was a guy who, back in his (sexually undernourished) 20s, regularly turned down coitus because there was no contraception on hand. I gotta right to think dirty thoughts: I'm accomplsihed at 'clean actions'.
 
Posted by kenmeer livermaile (Member # 2243) on :
 
Whew. I just spent 5 minutes skimming threads at Hatrack. I hadn't realized how bored I was...
 
Posted by kenmeer livermaile (Member # 2243) on :
 
A clear blue sky. Blossoming trees. Birdsong. And... the New Flu seems to finally be taking its leave of me.

It IS Sunday. Let us pray... (I generally hold devotions in a certain meadow 10 miles south of town with my 3 doggies and a thermos of coffee... ciao, babies)

[ April 24, 2005, 01:07 PM: Message edited by: kenmeer livermaile ]
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
In case anybody that has given up on the Ken Adams thread missed it: Ken Adams is...my son! [Eek!]

quote:
I just found out WHY Ken Adams sounds like everybody else from Texas. Ken Adams is the name Joey on "Friends" uses as an alias when sleeping with women that he doesn't plan on ever seeing again.

As I mentioned Friday, my wife and kids went out of town to her families this weekend. And, unfortunately, my oldest is as big a smartass as his dad. And he knows how to push his old man's buttons. I must apologize for his spelling, it is a reflection of the Texas school system. So, Tom, we were both right. It was an atheist pretending to be a Southern Baptist. Sorry for all the hubbub. If anybody wants, I'll be happy to whack him for you.

KE


 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
KL, I wish there was some way you could email me that Andy Griffith stuff.

KE
 
Posted by kenmeer livermaile (Member # 2243) on :
 
Get a P.O.Box. I prefer not to make any transition from cyberreality into physical reality until after ya year or more of anonymity, but maybe the P.O. still does General Delivery?

I can sned you a burnt CD.
 
Posted by kenmeer livermaile (Member # 2243) on :
 
I can send you one too [Wink]
 
Posted by cperry (Member # 1938) on :
 
I kinda like the sound of sned. It has an appealing twang to it. Like your postal carrier has allergies.
 
Posted by kenmeer livermaile (Member # 2243) on :
 
"I kinda like the sound of sned. It has an appealing twang to it. Like your postal carrier has allergies."

Ooh! Gross! Ick! (Now that I know you are capable of such sophomoric unniceties, I'm REALLY inclined to think impure thoughts about you, cperry. Women who make snot jokes are MY kinda wimminz.) [Wink]
 
Posted by cperry (Member # 1938) on :
 
Oh my, Kenmeer. I taught middle and high school English for 16 years. I own sophomoric and scatological humor! You can see the benefit of this: might as well ask the kiddies if they can see that booger that feels as if it's swinging from my nostril every time I exhale rather than have them talk bad about me in the hall after class.
 
Posted by potemkyn (Member # 1040) on :
 
"Whew. I just spent 5 minutes skimming threads at Hatrack. I hadn't realized how bored I was... "

If anything deserves a good chortle, its that.

Chortle, chortle, chortle...
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
Happy 9,000th post Ev! [Big Grin] [Smile] [Cool]

KE
 
Posted by Funean (Member # 2345) on :
 
cperry, just finished Lilith's Brood (trilogy in one volume). *Fabulous*...lots to think about. Must.buy.more.
 
Posted by simplybiological (Member # 1344) on :
 
http://www.nerve.com/surveys/morals_results/

a fun sex and morals poll that indicates what a highly specific audience reads nerve.com
 
Posted by cperry (Member # 1938) on :
 
Funean - Glad you liked it. It is indeed fabulous (reminds me of Ursula Le Guin, I think, in some ways). I've liked every book I've read of hers.
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
SB, I love those people, who are they?

KE
 
Posted by simplybiological (Member # 1344) on :
 
KE- http://www.nerve.com/aboutus/what/

i read it every day.
 
Posted by kenmeer livermaile (Member # 2243) on :
 
My daughter hates it that one of the few things I really put my foot down on is not allowing her to come to the door with her boa snake wrapped around her neck, when Mormons or JWs of what-have-you Xtians come to our door spreading the 'good news', and do her Satan-worshipping redneck/snakeneck trance ritual.

I explain to her that she'll frighten these people, which is not only cruel but dangerous.

Frightened people do WEIRD things. My daughter does not yet understand that these people can easily be more frighteningly weird than her best attempts to be the worst she can be.

But she comes by it naturally. I'm the guy who has to suppress his impulse to make blackface scarecrows and hang them from a front yard tree limb while a Mogen David burns in the front yard...

...sort of Lost Tribe of the Klu Kulx KLan thing...

...but I did throw a fake bomb at the local news satelllite minivancam when it parked in the dentist's empty parking lot next door with its floodlights on full as it did a story on (what proved to be a fake) bomb scare down the street from us.

The cops wouldn't tell us what was goping one (but the TV news morons, yes, eh?) but I learned by accident from the checkout girl at the supermarket across the street who lived in the house next to the bomb scare house and had learnt of the scare via cell phone call from her parents.

Imagine the three households of my in-laws who live in this same town watching the evening news and seeing an image dominated by our house glowing in 'News Now' floodlights as Joe Morn newscaster say, "POlice won't offer more details than of a possible bomb scare on the street of (my street)..."

So I open my front door, bit the pretend pin off a pretend hand grenade (old tin can), and threw it at the van, ducked, then ran inside.

Thus did my relatives know, even before calling us in a panic, that all was probably well qat our household.

Stupid dumb cops, stupid moron news...

Returning from the supermarket, before I threw the grenade, I passed by the lady cop who'd politely told me that what the fuss was all about was none of my busines. I stopped and said, "Yes, those police pants DO make your butt look big."

[ April 29, 2005, 12:29 PM: Message edited by: kenmeer livermaile ]
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
I thought Mogen David was a wine? Stacy's godfather is Larry Gatlin. I swear. Her father and Larry are best friends. Larry even told a story on the Tonight show, back when Johnny Carson was the host, about him and Stacy's dad trying to change Stacy's diaper. We have to hear that story everytime we get together with that part of her family. But, I can't complain, she has to hear about how I threw up in the broccoli bowl everytime we get together with my family.

But I digress. So, I know Mogen David is a wine because he sings that song, and Stacy makes us listen to everything Larry sings. So, why is a wine burning in the front yard?

KE

[ April 29, 2005, 06:59 PM: Message edited by: KnightEnder ]
 
Posted by Funean (Member # 2345) on :
 
This takes the cake.

From an email I received today (spam):

"Penis Growth Patches are the newest, safest and absolutely most potent patch you can buy. No other patch even comes close to duplicating the results found with our Penis Growth Patch."

What would happen if you put one on your head?

I might have to find out.
 
Posted by cperry (Member # 1938) on :
 
I never open spam. Wow, look at the opportunities I've been missing!
 
Posted by kenmeer livermaile (Member # 2243) on :
 
"What would happen if you put one on your head? I might have to find out."

Considering that you're a member of the memberless gender, ma'am, I reckon you'd develop a case of penis ennui?

Mogen David is Hebrew (or Yiddish?) for Star of David, the hexagram made of two triangled superimposed on each other, one inverted. Kind of the Jewish logo.

Burning wine? That would be a MOlotov cocktail, yes?

Incidentally, I fibbed a touch on the bomb story. I didn't think to grab an actual phony grenade when I mimed throwing a fake boom-boom. I just added it after the fact because, well, I SHOULD have thought to throw a tin can at 'em. Imagine how silly they'd have felt when they ducked as it went 'clink! roll....'
 
Posted by Funean (Member # 2345) on :
 
quote:
I fibbed a touch on the bomb story
Probably why you weren't arrested. Especially after the pants remark. [Big Grin]

I wish your family lived in my neighborhood. Your daughter sounds awesome.

But then I have strange standards for neighborliness.
 
Posted by kenmeer livermaile (Member # 2243) on :
 
"Probably why you weren't arrested. Especially after the pants remark."

Think it through a bit. If they'd taken me to court my lawyer would have eaten them for lunch. The news knew but the people in the hood didn't? It was a legitimate bomb scare until proven otherwise. The guy had a wire running from his car battery to his oil fuel tank and had said he had a bunch of nitro fertilizer involved... it wasn't just a phone-in prank (for which they have several times evacuated an entire school).

My family were sitting round the fireplace (I'd moved the TV into it) with couch and chair backs to the windows in case of blast-induced flying shards of glass.

They would have gotten slammed with 'frivolous lawsuit' and some form of dutiful neglect and then I would have hammered 'em for pain and suffering for personal harrassment.

Wish I'd had a SMOKEBOMB I could've stuck in a tin can. The whole thing was so unprofessional.
 
Posted by Funean (Member # 2345) on :
 
Sounds like a fabulous emergency response team you've got there.

Your lawyer should have had them for lunch. And tea.
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
I just won $300 dollars playing poker with my dad's friends. Money won is twice as sweet as money earned. [Big Grin]

KE
 
Posted by kenmeer livermaile (Member # 2243) on :
 
I'm imagining Andy Griffith doing What It Was, Was An Online Forum:

"..they'd slander one anuthah, and call one anuthah NAEMS, and GRUND their CAPS KEYS into on authah, and STOMP one anuthah's logic, and just as soon as one of 'em'ed had enough, they'd boot him off and tow anuthah'un IN!..."
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
I was rereading one of the Lazarus Long stories last night before bed and Lazarus talks a lot like Andy Griffith in that peice.

KE
 
Posted by WarrsawPact (Member # 1275) on :
 
I'm sure several of you have seen this before.

You can read this.

I cdnuolt blveiee taht I cluod aulaclty uesdnatnrd waht I was rdanieg. The phaonmneal pweor of the hmuan mnid. Aoccdrnig to a rscheearch at Cmabrigde Uinervtisy, it deons't mttaer in waht oredr the ltteers in a wrod are, the olny iprmoatnt tihng is taht the frist and lsat ltteer be in the rghit pclae. The rset can be a taotl mses and you can sitll raed it wouthit a porbelm. Tihs is bcuseae the huamn mnid deos not raed ervey lteter by istlef, but the wrod as a wlohe. Amzanig huh? Yaeh, and I awlyas thuohgt slpeling was ipmorantt.


Hehe. Cool.
 
Posted by The Drake (Member # 2128) on :
 
Or maybe it only works for people who have had to put up with forums, email, and text messaging.
 
Posted by A. Alzabo (Member # 1197) on :
 
WP:
quote:
I'm sure several of you have seen this before.

Jef Raskin(RIP) had an interesting response to the "scrambled word theory". Seems it works well for some words, but not others -- and it helps if you "cheat".

[ May 02, 2005, 02:44 PM: Message edited by: A. Alzabo ]
 
Posted by simplybiological (Member # 1344) on :
 
a girl in one of my classes mentioned that it doesn't work in russian- you need the last two letters to make sense of stuff.
 
Posted by WarrsawPact (Member # 1275) on :
 
Ah, A. Alzabo, thank you for that. Took me a little while longer this time.
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
That is great. I have never seen that before. Thanks WP.

KE
 
Posted by Funean (Member # 2345) on :
 
Anyone see "House" tonight? It was particularly great, and bizarrely consonant with some of our recent threads.
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
Anybody know what is up with Kenmeer? Haven't seen him lately?

Recorded House watched Veronica Mars. I'll get back to you tomorrow.

Ev, what the hell is wrong with Ephram? I think she is too good for him and should move on. What do you think?

KE
 
Posted by javelin (Member # 1284) on :
 
I think Kenmeer mentioned that he was feeling better, and posting here had "lost it's thrill".
 
Posted by kenmeer livermaile (Member # 2243) on :
 
Jav: kenmeer just returned from 2 days in your fair adopted city (Portland) enjoying MRIs, echocardiagrams and other medical probings. I spent the nitght of my first day there lying on my back in a hotel enjoying my forst 12-hour nosebleed, BUT!!!... by 11 AM the next day I was relatively chipper and spent 4-5 hours experiencing the treasures of downtown eastside Portland, primarily the Pearl District and Chinatown. I will probably write a long rambling essay about my adventures. Traveling DO inspire the writer in one's soul.

The thrill of intellectual discourse here at Ornery has lost its allure for me (although now that Pete at Home has returned, I might sharpen up my spurs and and have at it.)

You live in an AWESOME city, Jav, and I envy you even as I know I'm a homebody Spokanite who doesn't plan on moving again if possible.

"Yaeh, and I awlyas thuohgt slpeling was ipmorantt."

I wonder what CHomsky has to say on this. IN human consciousness, context is EVERYTHING. We are walking miniature worlds. Why is sp[elling important? So our words can read us: they don't have the advantage of multiplexing context-rich brains...
 
Posted by javelin (Member # 1284) on :
 
Why thanks, Kenmeer - I take all the credit I can for it! [Smile] Little hurt that ya didn't mention your visit, though - I've offered a free lunch before to visitors... *sigh* [Wink]
 
Posted by kenmeer livermaile (Member # 2243) on :
 
I didn't have much time; I have little interest in 'meating' people in 'real life' (internet discourse offering far more substance for a mind like mine); Portland is hard for a newcomer to find their way around in; and I DID spend 12 hours (4pm May 2nd to 4am May 3rd) lying flat on my back, enjoying the sensation of congealed blood ropes slowly micro-oozing their way down the back of my throat while I struggled to suppress the urge to swallow-suck them away, for doing so would apply vacuum pressure to the blood vessels I was trying to get to stop leaking... I wouldn't have been very good company, really.

But I did have a fantastic breakfast at The Roxy. A treasure...

[ May 04, 2005, 12:39 PM: Message edited by: kenmeer livermaile ]
 
Posted by javelin (Member # 1284) on :
 
Fair enough - wasn't trying to make you feel guilty (well, much) [Smile]
 
Posted by A. Alzabo (Member # 1197) on :
 
quote:
I've offered a free lunch before to visitors...
Javelin, I think we all know there's no such thing!
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
Did the Bible actually say that the Sun revolved around the Earth prior to Copernicus or Galileo?

KE
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
Anybody know anything about the adds at the bottom of the web pages here on OA? Does OSC vouch for these sites?

KE
 
Posted by Adam Lassek (Member # 1514) on :
 
They're Google ads, so they're probably variable depending on the content of the page.
 
Posted by kenmeer livermaile (Member # 2243) on :
 
"Did the Bible actually say that the Sun revolved around the Earth prior to Copernicus or Galileo?"

Probably so, but not as scientific canon but simply as empirical observation. AFter all, to the naked eye, it DOES go around the earth.
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
Thanks Adam.

KL, Yes, but when you are getting your material straight from God the creator...

Anybody remember that song from the 80's "She Blinded me with Science"? I was watching an old Cary Grant movie (I wish I was that suave) and he said about an attractive woman; "She fairly blinds you with science." I've been hearing that song for twenty years and never had an idea that that was an old saying. I guess there is truly nothing new under the Sun.

KE

[ May 08, 2005, 08:35 AM: Message edited by: KnightEnder ]
 
Posted by Funean (Member # 2345) on :
 
Well, I'd just like to say to all the Everwood viewers out there that Ephram has been made into an almost unbelievable schmuck. Like to the point that it was unwatchable. Did the actor ask to leave the show or what? Because it's just that hateful.
 
Posted by kenmeer livermaile (Member # 2243) on :
 
" I was watching an old Cary Grant movie (I wish I was that suave) and he said about an attractive woman; "She fairly blinds you with science.""

Probably not an old saying, just Thomas being VERY hip and putting that phrase to music.

Dolby's awesome.
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
I didn't see tonights show (playing basebal with my boys) but I recorded it.

Amy should definitely leave him. I can't believe how bad he wanted her and now he is just walking away. She's too good for him anyway.

Stacy says that the producers want to prove that the show can make it without Ephram. Why? We don't know. But apparently he will be gone for several episodes.

KE
 
Posted by kenmeer livermaile (Member # 2243) on :
 
" Ephram has been made into an almost unbelievable schmuck. Like to the point that it was unwatchable. Did the actor ask to leave the show or what? Because it's just that hateful."

They're setting it up for a Jeckyll'n'Hyde subplot?
 
Posted by simplybiological (Member # 1344) on :
 
forget everwood, cameron is coming back on house (like we ever thought she wouldn't?)... and they're going on a daaaaate....
 
Posted by kenmeer livermaile (Member # 2243) on :
 
(from another thread but belonging here on our Big Comfy Couch):

"Tomorrow we're having a discussion on discussing discussions discussed by discussers..."

This reminds me: I remember when calling someone a cocksucker was an insult.

Here at Ornery, in the spirit of open sharing of information and breaking down of old stereotypical bondaries, I mentioned that I'd been a cocksucker myself in the past. I was told that was insulting to others here and a violation of Ornery rules.

None of which changed the fact that I'd been a cocksucker in the past.

Somehow, to say I'd been a fellater of penii didn't get it across.

Anyway, it's been nice knowing yez more often than it hasn't been nice knowing yez but, after spending my 5 months here, I'm reminded of why I dropped out of the social circus in high school during sophomore year and became largely a loner.

I bequeath my mackerel to Funean (who probably thinks that is a phallic reference, but it ain't.) She will wield it wisely, I think. I'd leave cperry a last limerick but I'm falling aslepp at the keypad. To canadian I leave my bent epee a la Superchicken. To KE I leave my two tutus: To-too and Too-to. To War I leave my hat, gummed into a tender chewiness but not eaten. To Hannibal I leave my best wishes and hopes for his nation as it learns to deal with the fact of its existence amid other nations. To OhPuhleez I leave my grandmother's turkey baster and the thought of doing Hamlet's soliloguy to Yorick's fetus. To sb I raise my glasses atop eyebrows arched in a manner both cynical, curious, loving and horny ("put down the bunny ears"). To PeteaH I leave the remote control to the elevator. To Edanall I leave a pair of fishnet stockings. To Tom D. I leave my entire knowledge of Arabic cuss words (3 epithets in all). To Ricky B I leave all the truly fine foul language that he knows but I don't.

And, of course, to the impeccable Monsieur Dey, I leave the check.

Feel free to indulge me privately. Distinguish it from spam or I won't open it.

I leave us with these words from my dear dead friend Charly:

"And now as I bid you adieu I breathe fondly on your ankles." (He hoped to be reincarnated as a dog under my care.)

"The secret of reincarnation today is the anonymity of the net -- and the tangibility of the net stocking."

Oh, I might play a practical joke from someone else's computer, but I won't return as a ghost, only as moi, Kenmeer of Livermaile. (Identity is the core of integrity.) I will, for oncew in my life, lurk. (So mooning me may not be wasted after all;) My fellow Orneryans can consider this high praise indeed. I rarely think forum posters have anything very interesting to say, but y'all make silent running worth raising the periscope...

"Ken, I hope you'll change your mind. You bring a vibrance and a certain loopy elegance to these pages. There certainly is no one else quite like you."

There's some truth to that. I'll be back down the road, I'm sure. Meanwhile, one of two things that clinched my rather sudden decision to split (that I immediately realized had been festering in my guts for a week or three) was recognizing in you someone who would do an excellent job of providing "vibrance and a certain loopy elegance to these pages", of whom "there certainly is no one else quite like", um, YOU.

(The other thing was watching OM get sucked into the same old Piss On PeteaH [POP]festival. PeteaH DOES have a knack for begging others to lift their leg on him, but in deciphering these yellow letters of urination in the snow, justifying them by asking folks to 'tone this down' or 'remember rule # Z' or such, is merely a joining into the feeding frenzy, in which case a moderator needs to take off their steenkeeng badges and roll into the fray under another moniker, or SOMETHING.)

Fortunately, you, Funean, are here to whack their peepees an they need it an it please ye (and ONLY when it does, I prithee, lest your sash no longer match your eyes, o true bluish one); and you're welcome for the fish, which is now triply entendred and reminds me that dolphins are alleged to be fantastically sensual and erotic creatures. Sometime, my sweetness, in an imaginary life that doesn't exist and is therefore all the more attractive, we must meet in a lagoon of langorous lust, you and I, while the sky lies beneath us like a table etherized under an impatient pair of scuttlingt claws... dangit, I'm ruining the mood, aren't I. I'm such a loon.

Anyway, as Sting sang in a song he wrote for an IMAX movie about dolphins, in whcih dolphin a sings a love song to dolphin b:

"I need you like this hole in my head."

I leave it to you to discern which hole in which head is implied... and invite you to contact Monsieur Dey and Peteah and OM on their private lines about taking my place in a sort of 'cage match/tag team' concept which we/I'd just about sold OM on indulging for us and the granting offer of which I quite rudely flung back in his face (for reasons of both relieving personal frustration via an ejaculation of 'miffiness', and to providesome pedagoguic insight into what a moderator DOES -- for I AM a presumptuous and audacious sort of Kenmeer (which name means 'sea view', by the way... *sigh* ain't I ROMANTIC? Have I reclaimed some of 'dah MOOOOD'?)

Contact me likewise if you have any questions regarding this and/or you just wanna hear me tawk doity (formal bow, chaste hand kiss, an honorable, "Yes dear, coming!" shouted nobly over my shoulder to my wisely wary wife...)

Like dah leetle crab says,

"Seeng widme naow":


"Now's your moment

Floating in a blue lagoon

Boy you better do it soon

No time will be better

She don't say a word

And she won't say a word

Until you kiss the girl



Sha la la la la la

Don't be scared

You got the mood prepared

Go on and kiss the girl

Sha la la la la la

Don't stop now

Don't try to hide it how

You want to kiss the girl

Sha la la la la la

Float along

And listen to the song

The song say kiss the girl

Sha la la la la

The music play

Do what the music say

You got to kiss the girl

You've got to kiss the girl

You wanna kiss the girl

You've gotta kiss the girl

Go on and kiss the girl"

I like being a dolphin, don't you, ma'am? Thanx, indeed, for this fish... we make lovely dolphins, don't we? Perhaps canadian will thus immortalize us in his photshop laboratory.How he'll morph Superchicken and Jessica Rabbit into hominid horny dolphins is a wonder to ponder, eh?

P.S. "soliloguy" I'm not sure what a soliloguy might be but, considering Hamlet's isolated existentialism, it is a striking typo, yes?

Now, if y'all'll excuse me, I gotta go see a Kidzmom about a goatie... [Wink] [Smile]

SHA LA LA LA LA LA don't be shy... I had NO idea that being a virtual Dirty Old Man/lech could be SO fulfilling. Walter Mitty don't know the HALF of it...
 
Posted by kenmeer livermaile (Member # 2243) on :
 
For Peteah and All of us:

<begin>
Spoken:
But, Peter, how do we get to Never Land?
Fly, of course!
Fly!
It's easy! All you have to do is to...is to...is to--
Huh. That's funny!
What's the matter?
Don't you know?
Oh sure, it's, it's just that I never thought about it before.
Say, that's it! You think of a wonderful thought!
Any happy little thought?
Uh-huh
Like toys at Christmas? Sleight bells? Snow?
Yep! Watch me now--here I go!
It's easier than pie!

He can fly! He can fly! He flewed!
Now, you try
I'll think of a mermaid lagoon
Oh--underneath a magic moon
I'll think I'm in a pirate's cave
I'll think I'll be an Indian brave
Now, everybody try--one, two, three!
We can fly! We can fly! We can fly!
This won't do--what's the matter with you?
All it takes is faith and trust...oh!
And something I forgot--Dust!
Dust? Dust?
Yep! Just a little bit of pixie dust

Now, think of the happiest things.
It's the same as having wings
Let's all try it, just once more
Look! We're rising off the floor
Jiminy! Oh my! We can fly!
You can fly! We can fly!
Come on, everybody, here we go!
Off to Never Land!

Think of a wonderful thought
Any merry little thought
Think of Christmas, think of snow
Think of sleigh bells - off you go!
Like a reindeer in the sky
You can fly! You can fly! You can fly!

Think of the happiest things
It's the same as having wings
Take the path that moonbeams make
If the moon is still awake
You'll see him wink his eye
You can fly! You can fly! You can fly!

Up you go with a heigh and ho
To the stars beyoond the blue
There's a Never Land waiting for you
Where all your happy dreams come true
Every dream that you dream will come true

When there's a smile in your heart
There's no better time to start
Think of all the joy you'll find
When you leave the world behind
And bid your cares good-bye
You can fly! You can fly! You can fly!

Spoken:
There it is, Wendy, second star to the right
and straight on 'til morning
<end>

Sometimes it is better to say 'flewed' than 'flew' -- ain't that right, Flyde?

Anyone remember the old Mary Martin B&W TV version of Peter Pan? Didn't Tiger Lily ROCK?!?!
 
Posted by Funean (Member # 2345) on :
 
sb, is it weird that I find both Brian on QAF and House hot?
 
Posted by javelin (Member # 1284) on :
 
Funean - as long as you find me undeniably sexy, I wouldn't worry about it [Wink]
 
Posted by Funean (Member # 2345) on :
 
But of course jav [Smile]
 
Posted by simplybiological (Member # 1344) on :
 
oh, not at all. i am victim to the same attractions.

i think for me it's the quick-witted misanthropy that does it.

season four of QaF has less sex, but hotter sex, and super-witty dialogue. i can't decide how i feel.

i swooned when house told the guy with the tat to get a pocket protector and THEN he'd be a rebel. i totally integrated it into my myspace profile.
 
Posted by Funean (Member # 2345) on :
 
Yeah, me too. The casting of the guy was perfect, also.
 
Posted by Funean (Member # 2345) on :
 
House quote of the evening:

"life just isn't worth living without blood"

hehehehe...
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
House's summary of Cameron's reasons for liking him seem pretty on the money. Where can they go from there?

Everwood was more of the same. I wish they would have 'something' happen.

Veronica Mars was the best show of the week so far. I cried twice. Who do y'all think was at the door. I hope it was Logan, but I don't think she would have looked so happy (guilty/relieved maybe) and I think she would have immediately been shocked by how beat-up he looked. Wasn't he fixin to get his ass kicked by Weavil, and or his gang, on the bridge? (The Matrix come hither fight move he did was cool, but he better have the kung fu to back it up.)

Tivo is killing me. Remember when television used to suck? Now there is too much to watch.

Newton never would have discovered gravity if he'd had Tivo. Hey, that should be there slogan! [Smile]

KE

[ May 11, 2005, 06:22 AM: Message edited by: KnightEnder ]
 
Posted by cperry (Member # 1938) on :
 
I agree, KE; Veronica was great. We've missed an episode or two over the season -- now we've got to fill in the blanks this summer. And my guess was Logan too, but Tom thinks it was ... oh, what's her old boyfriend's name (I'm so old I have no brain left).
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
Duncan. That's who Stacy thinks it is too. After she said it, I have to admit I think they are right. But I'm still hoping she ends up with Logan. He's getting a raw deal all the way around. His girlfriend is screwing his father and everybody else, then she is killed by his father, his mother commits suicide, then he loses Veronica, and to top it all off he gets the crap kicked out of him for no reason. He deserves to end up with Veronica.

KE

[ May 11, 2005, 02:43 PM: Message edited by: KnightEnder ]
 
Posted by cperry (Member # 1938) on :
 
Yeah, Duncan. I was gonna say Dillon/Dylan and knew that wasn't it. Gee, I might as well start calling my kids by each other's name.

I really think Logan's character is very interesting, compelling, and well acted. And it's so great to see Harry Hamlin play a bad guy.
 
Posted by Funean (Member # 2345) on :
 
So.....

http://www.cafepress.com/cp/info/

Ornery gear, anyone?

Do ya think Uncle Orson would provide copyright permission for things like hats and mugs? If we promise nothing inappropriate?

I really, really want an Ornery mug and mousepad.
 
Posted by OpsanusTau (Member # 2350) on :
 
Man, you can get anything made, huh?
That's neat.
 
Posted by Funean (Member # 2345) on :
 
And in small lots, too!
 
Posted by cperry (Member # 1938) on :
 
I would LOVE an OA t-shirt or bag. (I've already got a Dragon Army mug and bag, nerd that I am!) Great idea, Funean!
 
Posted by Funean (Member # 2345) on :
 
It's all part of the "absurdly sincere" aspect of my personality that seems to be morphing over my entire body.
 
Posted by Funean (Member # 2345) on :
 
Who do we ask? OM? Oh, OMMMMMMMM?
 
Posted by Haggis (Member # 2114) on :
 
Hey guys,

You won't be hearing from me for a few days. My wife's nominated for a daytime Emmy, so we're going to New York for the awards. I'll be back next week. Please keep your fingers crossed. Be well [Smile]

[ May 12, 2005, 10:01 PM: Message edited by: Haggis ]
 
Posted by Zyne (Member # 117) on :
 
Whoop!
 
Posted by Funean (Member # 2345) on :
 
Wow!
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
Good luck!
 
Posted by cperry (Member # 1938) on :
 
Haggis, very cool. Y'all enjoy!
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
My wife wants to know what show and what for?

KE
 
Posted by simplybiological (Member # 1344) on :
 
hey ya'll. i'm heading to west texas for two weeks on a field entomology trip.

talk to you in june.
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
Watch out for the Armadillo.

I have a question. For some reason a lot of people use lower case letters to start their screennames even when they are proper names. I have a hard time writing names with a lower case. Of couse I also called a guy my age 'sir' in a poker game the other day, so maybe it is just my upbringing. Am I being rude by capitalizing Canadian when canadian spells it canadian? I feel disrespectful writing it like that but if that is how they want it I guess I should?

KE

[ May 15, 2005, 07:16 AM: Message edited by: KnightEnder ]
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
Wouldn't Lazlo Hollyfeld be a great screenname?

(For those of you who don't know that is the name of the #1 genius that lived in the basement, via Val Kilmer's closet, in the movie "Real Genius".)

KE
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
Someday when I'm really bored I'm going to try to make a whole sentence or sentences using only emoticons and linking verbs. Where's Ken when I need him? [Frown]

KE
 
Posted by JoshuaD (Member # 1420) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by KnightEnder:
Someday when I'm really bored I'm going to try to make a whole sentence or sentences using only emoticons and linking verbs. Where's Ken when I need him? [Frown]

KE

I do it all the time on aim. Half my vocabulary are those damn emoticons.
 
Posted by cperry (Member # 1938) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by KnightEnder:
Watch out for the Armadillo.

I have a question. For some reason a lot of people use lower case letters to start their screennames even when they are proper names. I have a hard time writing names with a lower case. Of couse I also called a guy my age 'sir' in a poker game the other day, so maybe it is just my upbringing. Am I being rude by capitalizing Canadian when canadian spells it canadian? I feel disrespectful writing it like that but if that is how they want it I guess I should?

KE

Most of the time I can't even remember if mine is cperry, Cperry, or CPerry. It sure doesn't matter to me! And frankly, some of these screen names are really tough to spell -- I hope folks don't mind that I misspell a few here and there.
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
Everybody should check out JoshD's thread with the "Kosovo" video. It is excellent.

Five 'Big Smiley Faces' [Big Grin] [Big Grin] [Big Grin] [Big Grin] [Big Grin]

There's a place called Kosovo...

KE
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
Thanks cpERRY. [Smile]


ke

Edited to add: The page just changed and I have the Omega & Alpha posts and since I don't want anyone to miss JoshD's thread. I'm reposting my recomendation here, too.

quote:
Everybody should check out JoshD's thread with the "Kosovo" video. It is excellent.

Five 'Big Smiley Faces' [Big Grin] [Big Grin] [Big Grin] [Big Grin] [Big Grin]

There's a place called Kosovo...

KE

Somebody that is really really bored ought to take all the video clips like that (Kosovo), the guy drinking fire, the guy that catches on fire while burning the American flag, and the "Is Everybody Having More Sex Than Me (thanks potemkyn) and put them on a single thread for all members to enjoy when they are really really bored. That would be [Cool] .

[ May 15, 2005, 01:36 PM: Message edited by: KnightEnder ]
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
I wish there was an ultimate authority here on OA.

Anybody ever get in an argument with somebody here and feel like they are losing their minds? I'll be saying something that to me seems like an incontrovertible fact, or an ultimate truth, like for instance; the sky is blue, and then someone comes along and insists that not only is the sky red and not only am I an idiot for ever thinking it is blue, but I'm an even bigger idiot for not seeing that how what I am saying only goes to prove and emphasize what a blazing shade of red the sky is! Up we go into the wild red yonder...(Except in these cases 'the sky' is never something you can look out the window and see).

For my own peace of mind (even if I'm wrong), I wish there were someone that we all agree knows everything and he/she could say; Okay, this is how it is. The sky is...whatever.

I know I'm not a genius, (although I consistently test just under so I know I'm not stupid either), but there are some things that I know, and there are things that are knowable (in so far as most intelligent people agree that they are so).

And I wish we could at least get a consensus on those things. If you know what I mean. [Confused] [Frown]

KE

[ May 15, 2005, 01:57 PM: Message edited by: KnightEnder ]
 
Posted by cperry (Member # 1938) on :
 
KE - Come on, you'd hate that! Isn't that why we're here at OA? Cause we don't want some "father figure" telling us what to believe? We fight for the right to figure it out for ourselves, even if it's ugly, uncomfortable, frustrating. That's what being an OA is all about, I figure.

Still, what particular question did you want answered? Even better, start a new thread. People can post their questions and answers; NO DISCUSSION ALLOWED. That could be interesting.
 
Posted by cperry (Member # 1938) on :
 
We could refer back to it in later discussions, kind of like how some people refer to the Bible (or Koran or whatever), as infallible evidence.

Now that would be fun!
 
Posted by JoshuaD (Member # 1420) on :
 
Hey KE, I was just looking at page 4. You play poker?
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
You're right, I wouldn't want that all the time. But don't you ever get frustrated when you know something is true and people disagree? I'm not talking about the big things like religion or anything, just the things you would think we can agree on like water is wet.

I'd settle for a thread in which people said yea or nea on whether I'm being an enormous ass, or not.

KE
 
Posted by cperry (Member # 1938) on :
 
"I'd settle for a thread in which people said yea or nea on whether I'm being an enormous ass, or not."

LOL.

I guess I really do understand what you mean, though. Sometimes all this arguing, especially over some of the details so that the big picture gets lost, grows old.
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
I love poker. I won $300 bucks last weekend playing tournament poker at a friends house. I won 2 of the 3 tourneys. But right now I'm only playing tournament poker, because I can buy in for such a low amount. I'd like to play internet poker (I've won thousands of dollars playing pretend internet poker) But, I never have the cash to make up for the ups and downs on internet poker, so that playing the pot odds and percentages eventually catch up and pay off.

I saw somewhere that you said you play to pay the bills, that is cool. I want to do that when I can have 20x the big blind to make up for the fluctuations, but not when that money is the rent money. Any advice for when I do? If you want to mail me the really good secrets my email is knightender@gmail.com. [Wink]

What site do you play on? How many tables do you play at a time? I play 5-10 limit online, how about you? Daniel Negreneau is my favorite pro. I hate Phil Helmuth. He is going to be in Houston in a few weeks. If I can get the money together I'm going to try to play in that.

KE
 
Posted by JoshuaD (Member # 1420) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by cperry:

I guess I really do understand what you mean, though. Sometimes all this arguing, especially over some of the details so that the big picture gets lost, grows old.

I've found that I can't fully understand an issue the first time I argue it. After about 3 or 4 times spread out over a little while, I'm able to get past all the pesky details and start looking at the big picture.

Sometimes you have to get caught up in the details, and it's ok. Just revisit the argument later on and try not to get stuck in the same detail.

[ May 15, 2005, 02:24 PM: Message edited by: JoshuaD ]
 
Posted by cperry (Member # 1938) on :
 
You're absolutely right, JoshuaD. I just happen to hate that part of it! Bad bad habit. Lazy lazy girl.
 
Posted by cperry (Member # 1938) on :
 
Hey, did Kenmeer really go away?
 
Posted by Funean (Member # 2345) on :
 
He was threatening to for several days, but didn't really, and now I suspect he's lurking.

Right, ken?
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
He's focusing on his writing. And even if he isn't monitoring the board I am still in touch with him via OWW and email, so if anybody needs him we can get in touch with him.

KE
 
Posted by cperry (Member # 1938) on :
 
Oh, good. I'm glad to hear he's not far gone.
 
Posted by JoshuaD (Member # 1420) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by KnightEnder:
I want to do that when I can have 20x the big blind to make up for the fluctuations, but not when that money is the rent money. Any advice for when I do? If you want to mail me the really good secrets my email is knightender@gmail.com. [Wink]

I don't mind sharing secrets -- I'm really active over at the 2+2 forums, where we all discuss poker strategy.

If you're playing limit, you should have at least 300x the big bet ($1200 to play $2/$4) to overcome variance. 50BB swings occur nearly weekly for me, and 100BB swings are about monthly.

Since I'm paying the bills with poker my bankroll is 600BB's, enough to still pay my bills if I have a bad month.

quote:
Originally posted by KnightEnder:
What site do you play on? How many tables do you play at a time? I play 5-10 limit online, how about you? Daniel Negreneau is my favorite pro. I hate Phil Helmuth. He is going to be in Houston in a few weeks. If I can get the money together I'm going to try to play in that.

I play on the party network, 8 tables of $3/6.

If you're really serious about wanting to improve your limit game, the best thing you could do is go buy two books, "Winning Low Limit Hold'em" by Lee Jones, and more importantly "Small Stakes Hold'em" by Ed Miller. SSH is by far the best book written on limit poker out there.

WLLH will turn you into a slightly winning player. You'll be passing up small edges to reduce variance, but you will be making a winning.
Once you get the hang of that, SSH will make you a monster at the table. There's no way else to describe it. Miller (and Sklansky and Malmuth) advocate a very aggressive style of play, one that will make you alot of money (at the cost of some variance).

If you want to take a stab into real money, you could pull it off with a deposit of ~300$. Start playing the .50/$1 game after reading though WLLH. After you get the hang of it (5000-10000 hands), pick up SSH and study it. That book will making you a winning low limit player.

If you wanted to play for less money starting off, I know some other sites (ultimate bet, pokerstars), offer micro limit tables going down to 1c/2c. Every one of these games is hugely beatable. Decide how much money you're willing to lose and put it in a game where you'll have 300 Big Bet's.

I don't know if you're really serious about playing, but if you are, all you need is discipline, intellegence, and time.

If you do register over at 2+2, give me a PM, I'm JoshuaD over there as well.
 
Posted by JoshuaD (Member # 1420) on :
 
Oh also, If you're a fan of Negraneu, check out his Poker Blog. That man plays for some insane stakes.
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
Josh, thanks for the advice. I have been studying poker for about 8 months now, and I've read eleven books so far, but neither of the two you mention, and a couple of them "Amarillo Slim's" book and "Positively Fifth Street" weren't really manuels but entertainment. The others were No Limit, except for the little beginers paperback by Helmuth, and it was really basic. I think about poker and Tivo and watch everything that comes on television, but I'm afraid I don't know enough about Limit so I'm really happy to hear about the Limit book you mention.

The people I beat at that tournament really weren't very good. Calling stations. The only problems were the girsl that wouldn't lay down a hand to save their life. The 3rd tournament of the 3, the only one I didn't win, I lost because I was heads up against a woman, I limped in with 4-3 suited, the flop came up 5,6,7 I checked, she checked, the turn came a 10 and I checked and she bet, I went all in, and she called. She'd started with a 10-6 off suit, she'd made two pair on the turn, and she called with a straight on the board, we flipped them over and a Six spiked on the River giving her a full house. She should have laid it down with a straight on the board, right? I guess I could have bet on the flop but with a made straight I was going for the kill. I guess you have to take solace in playing it right even when you lose? "That's Poker", right?

Anyway, I love the game and am kind of obsessed with it, I've even learned to spin the chips like Gus Hansen. I go to sleep thinking about Poker now like I used to do hitting when I was playing professional softball. I was a pro at that but the biggest contract I ever signed was $20,k plus bonuses, some guys made a lot more.

I started out playing "D" level softball with my buddies and graduated to "C", "B", "A", "AA", "Major", "Major Open", and finally to "SuperOpen" so I know how you have to be the best in your league, then your town, then your state, until you can play with the best in the country and that is what I want to do with poker. But more importantly I'd like to be able to make good money doing it. Well I'm rambling, thanks for the advice I'll see you at that other site.

Wait, one more question; On the lower limit money games you suggested do the people still play smart or do they stay in with anything because the money is so low? And are the "real" money games a lot tighter than these practice games I've been winning?

Oh, I forgot to say that I got one of those computer Hold'em games (Hoyle) and I racked up thousands of hands and I won every tournament on it racking up millions of dollars, but the computer is pretty predictable after a while.


KE

[ May 16, 2005, 10:20 AM: Message edited by: KnightEnder ]
 
Posted by cperry (Member # 1938) on :
 
Switching topics for a second (I'll never be very good at poker -- can't keep a secret for a second!).

Remember back when we were speculating names for different types of threads? Well, why don't we come up with a thread like "Outside?" THen, when people totally derail a perfectly decent conversation to nitpick whether or not someone has offended someone else, they can take it "Outside." Then, when they've resolved their differences, they can come back to the conversation.

Is anyone else crazed by this kind of stuff, or am I just still so new at this that I should suck it up and learn to deal with it?
 
Posted by javelin (Member # 1284) on :
 
That's cute, I like it cperry. And YES! I hate it when people completely derail a thread I've been lurking on and learning from! [Wink] [Smile]

[ May 16, 2005, 05:10 PM: Message edited by: javelin ]
 
Posted by cperry (Member # 1938) on :
 
Thanks, Javelin. As I got to the end of my post, I started wondering if I was overreacting. "Maybe I'm just missing something important in these posts," I thought. But I really do have a hard time following the original conversation when things devolve into a "You're stupid" - "No, you're stupid" kind of battle.
 
Posted by Funean (Member # 2345) on :
 
Me too. It's one thing if it's a one line thing--"by the way, what did you mean by X" "I meant blah" "oh, okay"--but when it goes on for 10 or 12 reciprocal posts I lose my way. Plus you feel sort of like you're interrupting to insert a post dealing with an actual thread-related point.
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
I agree with CPerry. I even hate it when I'm the one doing it cause, though I feel it is necessary, I know it is rude and derailing the thread.

KE
 
Posted by kenmeer livermaile (Member # 2243) on :
 
"It's one thing if it's a one line thing--"by the way, what did you mean by X" "I meant blah" "oh, okay"--but when it goes on for 10 or 12 reciprocal posts I lose my way"

Usually it means, foremost, that the two correspondents have lost their way. Worse, it is all too often a matter of one with a flashlight and map striving to set compass bearings while the other -- deliberately or through ignorant compulsion -- strives to reorient the entire world of historico-empirical reality to their personal inner bearings.

After 4 posts -- 2 each way -- the issue is either resolved to the better understanding of all of begun into a kudzu-arched labyrinth of its own devious design.

Wise hobbits follow not that trail...

(Kenmeer, rather impressed by the utility of message-in-a-bottle-of-E-mail... stuff works...)
 
Posted by JoshuaD (Member # 1420) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by KnightEnder:

The people I beat at that tournament really weren't very good. Calling stations. The only problems were the girsl that wouldn't lay down a hand to save their life.

That's a gooooooood thing. You just value bet alot of marginal hands against them.

edit: And really peel back the bluffs/semi-bluffs. Once in a while I'll make an inexpensive bluff and make sure they see it, so they keep calling down, but even that probably isn't necessary.

[ May 18, 2005, 12:02 PM: Message edited by: JoshuaD ]
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
Josh, am I going to get used to the format over there? It sure seems hard to follow compared to here.

KE
 
Posted by Haggis (Member # 2114) on :
 
I'm back from New York and the Daytime Emmys. Well, the part of the daytime emmys that are shown on the telecast as "Earlier this week..." with about a minute of highlights. Still, it was a pretty big deal.

KE- She was up for Best Children's Special: Saving a Species - Manatees. HBO took the Emmy with a special on Rosa Parks. Even though she didn't take home a statuette, it was a lot of fun. Tony Danza was the host. I was hoping to be seated at a table with Mr. Snuffleuppagus, but had no such luck. I did meet Bob from Sesame Street, so that was pretty cool.

Thanks to all for the kind thoughts and best wishes. I'm very tired now and I'm going to take a nap because I'm going to see Episode III at midnight.
 
Posted by Funean (Member # 2345) on :
 
You met Bob?!
 
Posted by JoshuaD (Member # 1420) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by KnightEnder:
Josh, am I going to get used to the format over there? It sure seems hard to follow compared to here.

KE

Oh man, you won't. Threaded is the ugliest thing since Marsha Washington. Go into your settings and change the default mode to "flat". (My Home > Display Preferences)
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
Haggis, congratulations for being nominated. I know that is a competitive field. You should be proud. And your wife and Star Wars seguees(sp?) nicely into what I came here to tell y'all.

I posted this on the Star Wars spoiler site, but I wanted to share it with my friends that are not Star War nuts, if they exist! Yesterday, Stacy, my wife, as if you don't know that is her name, got me the ringtones of the music in the bar scene in the original Star Wars. She knows I love that scene and that music. She even got C3PO to be my screensaver. I would have preferred Boba Fet, (don't tell her), but she's a girl, actually that's not fair (and a little sexist [Frown] [Embarrassed] ) she probably knows that and C3PO was all they had or something, she's that thoughtful. Is it any wonder we've been happily married for sixteen years? She's the best. [Smile]

Josh, thanks for the tip. Glad to know it's not just me. (That's not very nice thing to say to a friend, is it? "Glad you are as miserable with it as I am! Misery loves company? [Frown] )

KE

[ May 19, 2005, 11:04 AM: Message edited by: KnightEnder ]
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
I'm going to see if they have the sound that the Star Trek communicators make when they get a call. How cool would that be? [Cool] I'm not a "Trekkie" but I can't believe someone hasn't made a cell phone that looks and works like a Star Trek communicator. They'd make a killing. Even if it didn't fire a stun beam. [Wink]

KE

[ May 19, 2005, 11:14 AM: Message edited by: KnightEnder ]
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
Anybody see "Lost" last night. That scene between Sawyer and Jack was excellent. Although Stacy got mad that after such a touching scene (She cried. She has loved 'Jack' since "Party of Five".) I had the nerve to ask if Sawyer's arms looked better than mine. (Apparently they are a little more cut-up. At least she's honest. Damn actors! Skinny bastards! Plus he has that Hawaii tan. And you know he'd just finished doing curls before that take!) Not that I'm jealous or vain in any way. [Embarrassed]

KE

[ May 19, 2005, 11:18 AM: Message edited by: KnightEnder ]
 
Posted by cperry (Member # 1938) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by KnightEnder:
I'm going to see if they have the sound that the Star Trek communicators make when they get a call. How cool would that be? [Cool] I'm not a "Trekkie" but I can't believe someone hasn't made a cell phone that looks and works like a Star Trek communicator. They'd make a killing. Even if it didn't fire a stun beam. [Wink]

KE

My husband sometimes takes his wallet (say when we're in line at the grocery store) and flicks his wrist to make it flip open like a Star Trek communicator (TOS, of course). He can make the quirky sound too. Never fails to crack me up. I'd LOVE it if someone could find that sound for cell phones!
 
Posted by EDanaII (Member # 1062) on :
 
@ cperry:

You mean, this one?

Of course, if I were ever to change my ringtone to something "Star Trekky" it'd probably be this one.

Ed.

Fixed link.

[ May 21, 2005, 12:30 PM: Message edited by: EDanaII ]
 
Posted by cperry (Member # 1938) on :
 
Way too cool. One for the cell and another for messages, maybe. Thanks, Ed!
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
Cool. Where did you get that Ed?

KE
 
Posted by EDanaII (Member # 1062) on :
 
A simple web search will find ya many many Star Trek sounds. They're also available on CD.

Ed.
 
Posted by cperry (Member # 1938) on :
 
Oh my. A whole CD.
 
Posted by EDanaII (Member # 1062) on :
 
Oh, hey. While I'm thinking about it... Have you guys seen this? Star Trek: The New Voyages?

I busted a gut laughing while watching the whole thing; it's awful. But I do admit, it has a certain "nostalgia" to it.

Ed.
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
Did any of y'all see that fight on the school bus between the bus driver and a fifteen year old kid? The bus driver attacked the kids, but he is only being charged with a misdemeanor and the kid (& his 13 year old brother) are being charged with felonies for defending themselves. I saw it on Fox News, but I couldn't find a link to the story. Crazy.

KE
 
Posted by The Drake (Member # 2128) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by EDanaII:
Star Trek: The New Voyages?

I busted a gut laughing while watching the whole thing; it's awful. But I do admit, it has a certain "nostalgia" to it.

Ed.

There is no God. I didn't think anyone could make Shatner look good. I am embarassed for them...
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
For those of you that know him, I heard from Enumclaw today. He is doing very well, but very busy with work. It was great to hear from him and I encouraged him to drop by if only to say 'hey' on the MC thread. I hope he does.

KE
 
Posted by Richard Dey (Member # 1727) on :
 
KL: The Enescu orgy is underway on WHRB Cambridge. 95.3FM http://www.whrb.org/ . Click regular stream or low band width. For orgies: http://www.whrb.org/pg/MayJun2005.pdf
 
Posted by foliated (Member # 2041) on :
 
Grad School was fun while it lasted...

But I guess I'm really, finally, done, for all intents and purposes. I submitted the thesis a few minutes ago. Now I can sit here, listen to Art Tatum play "Get Happy" and ... get happy!

I just wish I hadn't had to sign away some of the rights to my research to be able to graduate. oh well.

Costs:

Dissertation submission fee: 115.00

I had to grant them non-exclusive license to distribute and sell copies of my thesis ... I get royalties iff their revenue exceeds USD
10 per annum. I also lose the rights to those royalties if I do not keep them apprised of my whereabouts. I just hate the idea that in
order to graduate I had to give someone else the right to make money off research that I never would have wanted to make a profit on (Euclid's saying applies particularly here since this is a geometry thesis). I would have preferred to just leave it on the web somewhere.

Copyright fee (I decided to do it through these people in the interests of getting it over with. Now I'm thinking that was not such a good idea, but oh well): 45.00

4 bound hardcover copies for family and friends to kvell over: 155.00

My SO said she paid more and went through a hassle to get bound copies of hers, so I decided to give in to the sales pitch they fed me as I was going through the submission process.

Total: USD 315.00

That's the most money I've spent in a fifteen minute period in a *long* time. I feel like I'm made of money all of a sudden.

Now to get a money order for $160 tomorrow, and sit through some kind of exit interview thingy, and then I think that's it.

Now I can get back to what I was working on before I had to stop and write up and defend.

Edited because I felt like it. [Smile]

[ May 26, 2005, 05:40 PM: Message edited by: foliated ]
 
Posted by javelin (Member # 1284) on :
 
Congrats, foliated! Will we be hearing more from ya? [Smile]
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
Congrats foliated!

KE
 
Posted by FiredrakeRAGE (Member # 1224) on :
 
Congrats foliated.

What're your plans after graduation? I know mathematics PhDs are in demand, but have no idea what for [Smile]

--Firedrake
 
Posted by Richard Dey (Member # 1727) on :
 
We need people with higher and higher math degrees to calculate the costs of government and debt [Wink] .
 
Posted by javelin (Member # 1284) on :
 
AH! The NSA. Whoohoo! Do YOU have a good mathmetical formula for breaking RSA encryption? [Wink]
 
Posted by Lifewish (Member # 1063) on :
 
Foliated: are you able to put it online anyway? As a second-year undergrad mathmo with a preference for pure maths, I'd be interested.
 
Posted by The Drake (Member # 2128) on :
 
Oh man. We are being overrun. I'm not exactly an old-timer here, but there are a lot of new folks that don't understand "our ways"...

Doesn't anybody lurk anymore to get the vibe of a forum? This used to be part of USENET etiquette. (as I date myself and reveal that this is the only board that I ever read or post on)
 
Posted by Funean (Member # 2345) on :
 
I used to post on a few USENET newsgroups, and lurking was definitely what one did. I miss threaded replies...

Did you see OPL's post warning of an influx of people from another board she evidently reads? Someone posted a link to the Smartland article. She warned of this very phenomenon, the google-enabled invasion.

Of course, that's how I ended up here too. <looks away, whistles a little tune>
 
Posted by cperry (Member # 1938) on :
 
I've seen it (a sudden influx of new posters) happen before. The folks who get it stay; those who don't usually drop out--cause there are enough really bright people here who know how to make it unpleasant for them.

But yeah, lurking for awhile to learn how to play along is always a good idea.
 
Posted by javelin (Member # 1284) on :
 
No worries, ya'all - as long as we are here, and we are who we ARE, then it'll all stabilize, and we'll have some fascinating new posters. It's great!
 
Posted by kenmeer livermaile (Member # 2243) on :
 
"Now I can sit here, listen to Art Tatum play "Get Happy" and ... get happy! "

Man but that fat man did play merry...

Invaders from other fora, boards, googlisms:

Welcome and have at thee!

M. Dey. Enescu wrote some remarkable stuff, and some pleasant but pedestrian platter fare. HIs violin playing was, before his illness, of a class AND kind all its own.

Menuhin, who was his most famous student, held him in an esteem just short of divine awe...
 
Posted by FiredrakeRAGE (Member # 1224) on :
 
Ornery was linked on fark. We might have a few new members soon.

--Firedrake
 
Posted by hywer (Member # 2046) on :
 
I still spend most of my time lurking, and I know the rules just fine. What does that mean, I wonder? (*cough* lazy *cough*)

Hurrah for new arrivals!
 
Posted by FiredrakeRAGE (Member # 1224) on :
 
Am I missing a great number of posts? As far as I have seen most people new to the forum are polite and well spoken. While there are a few exceptions, afaik, they are both rare and short lived.

--Firedrake
 
Posted by cperry (Member # 1938) on :
 
I rode with Rolling Thunder in the Memorial Day event in DC today! It was a very interesting experience. We heard estimates of over 300,000 bikers, but I'm not sure if that's true. There were a lot of us. We arrived at 10am. The bike ride down Constitution Ave (from the Pentagon, where we were parked) started at noon; we didn't start moving out of the parking lot until 2:30. Lots of bikes!
 
Posted by The Drake (Member # 2128) on :
 
Why is that I've seen dozens of posts calling people liars, but never a one that allows for someone to just be mistaken? Are we so powerful, that every distorted fact must be a deliberate attempt at deception? [Smile]

Didn't deserve a thread, but I had to get it out there.
 
Posted by javelin (Member # 1284) on :
 
YES! I am NEVER wrong - I'm just LYING. [Wink]
 
Posted by FiredrakeRAGE (Member # 1224) on :
 
quote:
"Never attribute to malice that which can be adequately explained by stupidity."

-Hanlon's Razor

--Firedrake
 
Posted by Funean (Member # 2345) on :
 
I wonder if it's not an effort to avoid the frequently-used-to-be-crappily-condescending "Perhaps you are mistaken" constructions I've seen elsewhere. Calling someone a liar at least presupposes that he or she is making the statement purposefully, rather than being unaware of its implications, or having forgotten an earlier point, or having failed to grasp the data.
 
Posted by javelin (Member # 1284) on :
 
Liar.
 
Posted by Funean (Member # 2345) on :
 
Perhaps you are mistaken.

Or just too stupid to grasp the import of my post.

( [Wink] , in case there was any doubt)
 
Posted by The Drake (Member # 2128) on :
 
Inflammatory replacements for "liar" or "Perhaps you are mistaken", culled from various movies and television:

What are you, on dope?

You cannot comprehend my argument, even with 100% of your brain.

Your opinion confuses and enrages me.

I am now dumber for having listened to you.
 
Posted by Funean (Member # 2345) on :
 
Stop smoking crack.
 
Posted by javelin (Member # 1284) on :
 
I, umm, seem to have missed adding the [Wink] to my posts. Sorry if anyone was confused.

One of my favs: "What are you, high?" and "Do you have to have a license to be that stupid?". Oh oh, and "YOU!... are a waste of space!"

[ May 31, 2005, 11:22 PM: Message edited by: javelin ]
 
Posted by EDanaII (Member # 1062) on :
 
Hmmm... Why does all of this make me think of "A Fish Called Wanda?"

"No. Calling you 'stupid' would be an insult to stupid people!" [Smile]

Ed.
 
Posted by kenmeer livermaile (Member # 2243) on :
 
My fave is '****head'.

I want to see a superhero called ****man.

Then I want to see his nemesis, Dr. Flusher, say, "I'm going to kick the **** out of you."

The child in me would be greatly pleased by this...
 
Posted by javelin (Member # 1284) on :
 
"The child in me" ~ "The child that is me"?
 
Posted by foliated (Member # 2041) on :
 
Lifewish --

Sorry for the delayed response.

I can still put it on the web if I want to. The license I had to grant is non-exclusive.

What I didn't like is that in order to graduate, I had to give someone else the right to profit by selling my work, under terms that they dictated, and which I couldn't modify. Especially since that someone else is not a branch of this university, but rather someone doing business with this university.

Fortunately I've found out that I can call them and opt out of the agreement.

But such things are of course the last thing you should think about when picking a place to get your doctorate.

Good luck in your studies.
 
Posted by Digger (Member # 2341) on :
 
"Inflammatory replacements for "liar" or "Perhaps you are mistaken", culled from various movies and television:"

This language you speak - it sounds strange and means little...
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
Funny Digger. [Smile]

On another subject my oldest son was asking me about copyright laws and why after a certain amount of time do people have to give up their creations?

KE

[ June 01, 2005, 05:30 PM: Message edited by: KnightEnder ]
 
Posted by simplybiological (Member # 1344) on :
 
hey ya'll... i'm back.

but 2 and a half weeks in the desert wean a girl from the internet and I'm going to try to keep it at a minimum. I'm here, but I might be slower to respond.

i'm so tired.
 
Posted by Funean (Member # 2345) on :
 
Hooray! Welcome back. Get a shower yet? [Smile]
 
Posted by javelin (Member # 1284) on :
 
Phew! Search the threads - I've been ASKING for you for WEEKS! [Smile] We missed ya.
 
Posted by Mabus (Member # 2471) on :
 
Knight, ask Dagonee, but it seems to me that eventually the matter of any successful set of memes will infect the public consciousness so thoroughly that keeping it copyrighted would severely limit free expression. If I suggest a "modest proposal", most people won't have a clue that I'm referring to a work by Jonathan Swift, but quite a few will know what I mean. Or I could refer to a Catch-22...or tell some Ahab he should just go hunt his whale...or just say "The truth is out there." At some point, even the speaker won't know his expressions are borrowed.
 
Posted by Mabus (Member # 2471) on :
 
(Er...to clarify that last one, of course a speech isn't in copyright danger except if it's in a movie or something...Perhaps I should have said "author", except that that might have been taken as the original author with the copyright. You get what I mean, right?)
 
Posted by The Drake (Member # 2128) on :
 
Alan Alda claimed to have invented "Are we having fun yet?", a line in his film "The Four Seasons". At the same time, he admitted that it might easily have been created in parallel.

There was a fantastic episode of Curb Your Enthusiasm, where comedian Richard Lewis claimed to have invented the phrase "The *blank* from hell".
 
Posted by simplybiological (Member # 1344) on :
 
The longest stretch we went without showers was 5 days, so not that bad... and we had a swimmin' hole (admittedly a little algae-laden, but cold and refreshing) there. Mostly we stayed at Nature Conservancy houses which had pretty adequate facilities (and they're free!). Since we curate and process an insect collection WHILE we're there, our prof tries to find places with electricity so we can work past dark without a generator going.

It was a pretty awesome trip... my best friend and I both caught an extremely rare beetle (rare in the US, at least...) and so now we get to feel fancy for catching two of the only ones in the US.

I'm still a little sleep deprived...
 
Posted by Mabus (Member # 2471) on :
 
Oooo...you lucky girl. I wish I were still in grad school, harrowing as the experience was. Maybe one day I'll get to go back and start over.
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
"Mabus" Is that the villain from First Wave?

KE
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
Avatars

If we were in a true Virtual Enviroment, what avatar would you use to represent you? (Mine I guess is fairly obvious.)

KE
 
Posted by javelin (Member # 1284) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by KnightEnder:
Avatars

If we were in a true Virtual Enviroment, what avatar would you use to represent you? (Mine I guess is fairly obvious.)

KE

Tigger. Definitely, absolutely - I'd be Tigger. Except on the days when I was Eeyor. And no - I'm not either. Matter of fact, I'm pretty much always exactly inbetween the two. Nonetheless - Tigger. Unless I'm Eeyor... [Wink]

[ June 03, 2005, 04:14 PM: Message edited by: javelin ]
 
Posted by Funean (Member # 2345) on :
 
I still want to be Mighty Mouse. Although I'm probably more of an Underdog (well intentioned, nevertheless bumbling).

Better yet, what avatars would you assign your fellow Ornerians?
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
Jav, can be Tigger, but you, Fun, would be a wise old sage, some kinda queen on a throne issuing decrees of rationale and justice.

KE
 
Posted by Funean (Member # 2345) on :
 
Oh, ew. Just for that you have to be Spanky (?)from Speed Racer. [Wink]
 
Posted by simplybiological (Member # 1344) on :
 
This actually wasn't related to being in grad school... it was a trip for undergrads, I just got to go because I'm tight with the prof. I really hate grad school quite a lot because of all the bull**** and politics, so I do things like take field classes I don't need that don't really add to my curriculum because I plan to leave and don't care what the administration feels about me anymore.
 
Posted by A. Alzabo (Member # 1197) on :
 
quote:
Spanky (?)
Was he the mechanic guy? 'Cause I think he was "Sparky."

I always liked Trixie, myself...
 
Posted by Funean (Member # 2345) on :
 
Yep, that's right--it was Sparky.

Ever notice how Japanimation of that era always had a couple of rather unanthropomorphic characters?

[ June 04, 2005, 10:37 AM: Message edited by: Funean ]
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
I liked Sparky. I thought you meant Spritle. I wouldn't mind being Chim Chim. That chimp was smart.

I think Sparky was doing Trixie while Speed was away on those long races. She wasn't named "Trixie" for nothing. A girls got needs.

KE

[ June 04, 2005, 04:02 PM: Message edited by: KnightEnder ]
 
Posted by Funean (Member # 2345) on :
 
I've heard the Speed Racer that was shown in the US was greatly sanitized to meet US kid show standards, and that the original Japanese show was for adults and much...friskier. I've never found out whether this were actually true, though, but I like the idea for some reason.

You know, it sucks all the fun right out of it for me if you *like* Sparky...can't you at least pretend to be outraged?
 
Posted by kenmeer livermaile (Member # 2243) on :
 
The idea of Speed Racer being sanitized for American tastes creates, in me weirder inner chambers of the self, the impressions of retroactive near-past as near-future dystopian sci-fi.

Sort of like an historical retrospective of 1984 viewed through Blade Runner. As if Time Travel agents had intervened 'just in time' (it's a joke, I say, I say, it's a joke, y'all) to make slight adjustments (like removing Speed Racer's raciness) in order to prevent a massive putsch by the Falwellian Moral Majority of the time.

I mean, if Tinky Winky with a purse gets Falwell going, imagine what riots of righteous coercion Speed slurping Racer X might have incited?

Welcome to NOW, where the Past is just as weird as the ever weirdening future...

Funean might be a wise sage, even old, but that throne is more likely an old-fashioned wooden swing a la Stevenson's A Child's Carden of verse.

And she don't wear no undaweah... but she has winking smilies painted on the undersoles of her purple Keds, and manages to conceal from we admirers the view of sage wisdom of most seek.

Little knobby knees, red raw ankles, 13 years old and devil may care...

...and I'm just turned 14 and building up the nerve to ask her if she wants to go skinny-dipping...

It is Sunday. Let us pray.

My avatar would be Peter O'Toole in thick Irish thorn proof tweeds, cigar en chomp, brandy snifter in hand, and shotgun cradled in left arm crook like 12-gauge spaghetti... oh yes, wearing British officer boots circa WWII.
 
Posted by cperry (Member # 1938) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by KnightEnder:
Avatars

If we were in a true Virtual Enviroment, what avatar would you use to represent you? (Mine I guess is fairly obvious.)

KE

KE - You oughta make this its own thread.
 
Posted by kenmeer livermaile (Member # 2243) on :
 
cperry, please don't Let's leave it here. It's my only playground at Ornery.

An avatar for you....:

Lauren Bacall. Absolutely.

"You DO know how to whistle, don't you?"
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
Too late, Ken. Sorry.

KE
 
Posted by simplybiological (Member # 1344) on :
 
oh my god, it is so HOT outside.

thoroughly unpleasant. i hate heat.
 
Posted by OpsanusTau (Member # 2350) on :
 
Yeah. Yuck.
Give me grey skies and mist any day.
 
Posted by javelin (Member # 1284) on :
 
Well, you are welcome to visit, SB and Ops. I can check with my roommate if you need a couch.
 
Posted by kenmeer livermaile (Member # 2243) on :
 
"Give me grey skies and mist any day."

Amazingly, that is what we've had here in the Inland Northwest for over two months now.

We've attached ourselves to Portland's weather. The local flora is ecstatically confused.
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
I know SB, I've been pitching BP to my boys in this crap. [Roll Eyes] [Cool]

KE
 
Posted by javelin (Member # 1284) on :
 
Glad to share, Kenmeer - we've got some of your summer weather last February, and a couple of days last month.
 
Posted by cperry (Member # 1938) on :
 
Thanks, Kenmeer. You are unendingly gracious. Alas, I cannot whistle at all.
 
Posted by kenmeer livermaile (Member # 2243) on :
 
Jav, we had that February sun too. It was terrif. Had no idea it would turn us into a poor man's Grant's Pass.

Cperry, you don't do the whistling. We men do the male wolf-woof whistle thing. The car door opens, cp's gorgeous gams begin to unfold and emerge, and we wait, hoping for a brief glimmer of the rainbow's end...

The Pyrate Wanne-Be Trireme Pleasure Cruise and Cannibal Oppressor Vessel has officially begun construction. Don't be too surprised if the subject of its construction, particularly suggestions and feasibility counselling, become part of this local miscellany.

It will come complete with a Moon Deck: a stout rail so one can moon the enemy without falling into the deadly shark-infested waters.

My boy will turn 11 during the week of this craft's maiden voyage. He and his best friend/older cousin, who is 12 or 13, will be, of course, first mates and then some.

So... we can imagine what a little glow in the dark paint might do when applied to yon young buttocks...

"Oo-oo-ooohhh.... wadda little moonlioght can do-oo-ooohhhh...."

Basic construction: 1/2 inch plywood decks, plastic buckets conjoined in series to make pontoons, 2 bicycle chassis' connected to a paddle...

The boat-building company, R.U. Knuttz, welcomes any suggestions. Also, any fair lassies wish to offer an image of their gleaming bosoms for a bow figurehead mermaid thingie, we'll promise not to slosh champagne over them. No bubbly on the jubblies...

[ June 07, 2005, 10:39 PM: Message edited by: kenmeer livermaile ]
 
Posted by kenmeer livermaile (Member # 2243) on :
 
I cannot stress enough the imnportance to the structural integrity of this craft that it proudly display an illicit image (i.e., not my wife's) of bosom.

It is like the crescent to a Saudi Arabian flag, a dog biscuit to a dog trainer, a pair of Depends to
nursing home lifstyle...
 
Posted by Funean (Member # 2345) on :
 
Well, check with javelin, but I'm pretty sure we never got those naked pics of Ops.

(Sorry, Ops...I can't seem to stop entertaining myself with mythmaking! [Smile] If it really bugs you please tell me and I'll stop at once)

I'd offer mine, but all the pics we have, have an infant hanging off of them like a pendant. And I'm not making more for the entertainment of the slack-jawed youth down at the Fotohut.
 
Posted by kenmeer livermaile (Member # 2243) on :
 
Freedom was ever a constant struggle....

Piratical Radio...

Radio Piracy of the Thames estuary and the North Sea...

Pirates' Redoubts...

A friend of mine in Flatterlandia (The Netherlands), is just the right age to remember tweaking the dial as a teenager to hear Santo & Johnny play 'Sleepwalking' the only place he could, through the alegal broadcasts of the North Sea radio pirates of the 60s.

Lest we doubt their piratical ways:

Hear Screaming Lord Sutch tell how he discovered an abandoned wartime defence fort and started Radio Sutch. When Sutch’s manager Reg Calvert took over the station, he changed the name to Radio City. Calvert was later shot dead in a dispute over ownership of a transmitter.
 
Posted by Mabus (Member # 2471) on :
 
KnightEnder> Sorry to delay....I wasn't paying attention.

The answer is yes and no...I wasn't thinking solely of the First Wave villain, but that's where I originally heard the name. I picked it up for a number of reasons, but one of the more amusing ones is that I actually read the Nostradamus reference in Centuries, which says only:

quote:
Mabus will then soon die and there will come a dreadful destruction of people and animals. Suddenly vengeance will be revealed, a hundred hands, thirst and hunger, when the comet shall pass.
Now, as I read that, the death of Mabus is a bad thing, suggesting that Mabus is not such a terrible guy.
 
Posted by OpsanusTau (Member # 2350) on :
 
quote:
(Sorry, Ops...I can't seem to stop entertaining myself with mythmaking! [Smile] If it really bugs you please tell me and I'll stop at once)
Doesn't bother me a bit.
Y'all can talk about nekkid pictures of me as much as you like; I'll still think it's funny, and I still won't have any.

[Razz]
 
Posted by Funean (Member # 2345) on :
 
Okay, then. [Smile]

In sadder news, Anne Bancroft has died. Another great loss for the theatre, and elegance in general.

Here's to you, Mrs. Robinson. Lots of us loved you more than you will ever know.
 
Posted by kenmeer livermaile (Member # 2243) on :
 
For no reason other than that Xmas is only 6 months away, give a few, and, well, just because. It's from an old round-Robin virtual fireside gathering I cobbled years ago from various foras' happy-go-lightly chatterboxers:

We begin with a recent comment from my Jewish friend who lives in Rhode Island, in response to my question to a Jew’s misgivings toward Xmas: “What’s wrong with Christmas?”:

ar: “Nothing that couldn't be cured by a little less overbearing assumption of its pervasiveness. There's always a store clerk who wants to ask my kids, "Are you getting ready for Santa?" This year Jake looked at one of them, and in his best 5-year-old dismissiveness replied, "No, I'm a Jew!" ”

Oy - my apologies. I used the term ‘Christmas’ too loosely. I agree with you wholeheartedly. Since striking my own accords with the Holidaze, I use the word ‘Christmas’ as an idealized projection of the better artificial light festivals of winter. As for the Merry Mandate, I feel much like you do, and when Santa is thoughtlessly applied like a magic decal on the foreheads of innocent children, I cringe. He’s a great fairy tale become myth, but myths should be wielded by folks with a respect for mythology. Folks who watch Hercules and Xena (?) reruns - i.e., too many people - should no more dispense such myths than bulls should sell chinaware.

By Christmas, I conceptually import Hakim Bey’s semi-popular countercultural concept, the Temporary Autonomous Zone, into my definition. Just as I flirt with Hannukah, so can you flirt with Xmas. Granted, it’s difficult for a ‘holiday outsider’ like you to flirt freely on your own when the wench follows you about the mall, hollering ‘Yoo-hoo!’ with her skirts hiked up, while an assortment of muscular mercantile pimps accost you at every corner. But you can have your fun just as well. Practice the following phrase: “Santa!? What a schmuck...” or “Santa!? Right. Send the bill to him, then.” Scrooge is, for me, a central facet of Christmas. An enlightened, post-ghostly-visitation Scrooge, who wields his former curmudgeonisms with a new, higher, exalted purpose. Shake their minds up for a moment or two, rattle their cages so they can hear the jingle bells of freedom.

Meanwhile or at least just last week, Rhode Island Joosh, myself, and our circle of correspondents was gathered again around the same topic:

12-18-01


I thought that the shamash* would be gone after the Holy Days Judaica, but it flares back up like a trick birthday candle; there’s no blowing it out. Makes a nice campfire. Hmmm... trick birthday candle. 8 days to Xmas. Eight candles. Eight reindeer.
(*shamash is the first and master candle of the Hannukah menorah.)

Yeah, Santa’s Jewish. The Wandering Jew, even. How would one wrap this riff up tight into an holiday ‘get shopping’ commercial? Fortunately, we don’t have to sweat such narrative niceties here, muscateers. There’s a call’n’response, pass-the-hot-potato style of story weaving practiced around campfires still in use to this day. The narrative fiber needn’t conceal its structure from its audience, for its audience is its narrative fiber. It floats between us, fluttering above the shamash fire.

Around the fire, it works like this: “No kidding? Santa’s the Wandering Jew?” Then this notion mulls awhile in our respective decanters: mine has a faux Granny Moses-style snowman flanked by a watering can on its right and a potted young - I want to say fir but it has red berries - tree on its left. It contains coffee (the decanter not the watering can). Received from an office Xmas party grab bag.

The notion also sizzles in the fire like a marshmallow’s apprentice, rising up like the smoke from your Uncle Pullmy’s finger. (I have no idea what that expression means but it begged to be written.) Then someone pulls a swig or tests the golden crispy at the end of their kabob - or is it shish? - and says: “Might explain how he seems to know so much about naughty’r’nice kids.”

A damning pause. The invisible fabric weakens, slackening in its middle until it can no longer be held up by the fire’s draft and instead scorches in the center. Invisibly, of course.

“That’s kinda lame,” someone says. “Some guy walking around watching, taking notes, asking questions...” but already the threads reassemble.

“Sure,” says someone else. “Why not? An old Hassidic guy with a huge beard and a Quixote fedora, though maybe he doesn’t wear a European grey suit nor spiral sideburns. At least not always. Maybe in America, for example, he wears denim jeans, and a plaid Bunyan lumberjack shirt. Mythologic borrowing. Those Grizzly Adams types always seem larger than life, even though they’re usually suffering from degenerative spinal disc problems, or collecting disability from Nam...”

“Yeah!”, says another. “And they’re the guys who’re always making wooden toys and lawn gizmoes, carving wooden bears from chainsaws... I mean WITH chainsaws... from wood. You know what I mean...”

“...and selling them in their front yards,” interjects another. The fabric, that had begun to achieve an impressive loft overhead - a baby Montgolfier balloon, a circus tent showing first indications of big top pregnancy - droops downward, sagging in the middle. Santa’s image runs, like melting candle wax watercolors, toward the sinking center, collecting like a faucet-drop of truer-than-life hues into a blob of inevitable grey and threatening to drip into the fire, which is now no brighter than the canvas overhead was moments ago. A fire dependant upon its own reflected gleams... Drip. Sputter. Sizzle.

“ ’s a front operation!,” shouts one of them, Joosh, single-handedly saving a community myth in the making and resolving his discomfort at this leavening of Santa’s Christian loaf with Jewish yeast.

“Uh-huh. And he has these old geezers all lined up across the nation and all over the world, making toys for little goys and girls, huh?” Sometimes I’m my own worst skeptic. But part of the alleged suspension of disbelief is doubting one’s own story. “He couldn’t go around setting up food collection and distribution agencies to save starving children, huh?”

The fabric doesn’t droop. Instead, it expands so rapidly that it grows mythologically threadbare, flapping in a sudden wind and ripping its cord like a ghost’s parachute. Some notions require a hope so strong, so rare, so forlorn (thus only beauty pageant contestants dare express wishes for world peace and an end to hunger). It’s one thing to stub one’s toe; it’s another thing to stick an axe through your foot. But there it is. Talk about Bunyan pain...

“Come on, guys,” says Joosh. “This is Santa Claus, not the Messiah. So a guy - a Jew, no less - walks the earth immortally. HE’S going to do our work for us? Save humanity from its inhumanity? Remember, he’s a freak, someone who’s been a member of the human race for so long he’s an outsider to his own kind. Did I mention he’s a Jew? Since when has humanity wanted us for anything but burial service? Humanity doesn’t want the Chosen People who denied Christianity’s Messiah to save them from anything. Don’t forgot this just because its so obvious. A guy can’t hide behind his eponymy just because it’s the only name he has.”

“ ’z name’s Marvin,” says Wolfy the Smirk.

“Marvin what?,” I demand. “Smith, fer chrissake?”

“Naw. This IS a Jew we’re talking about. Schwartz. Marvin Schwartz.”

“Yeah, I’ll bet that’s just Yiddish for Smith.”

“Whatever. ANYway, guys,” says Joosh. “This guy is not gonna place himself too deep into the social mainstream. Too many auto-da-fes going round history. Mythological magic seems a safer retreat, I would think. Likewise the North Pole. Besides, ever notice how the older folks get the more they tend to like children?”

“Missing zerr own childhood,” says the Flemish gentleman with the candy apple red clogging shoes with ivy green trim. “I know I do.”

“Not everyone had such a happy childhood,” says another, patting her own child’s head in the ancient gesture of parental promise, which translates as: “Life, for you, will be better than it really is.” A promise often amazingly well-kept, but just as often broken by forces beyond our ken. THIS is the mainspring that turns the spindle which revolves the calendar around the axis of Xmas. One sometimes thinks we could do better than seasonal shopping sprees at Wal-Mart, but history records that we have also done much worse. Take your blessings where ye find them. Xmas is only 2000 years old. Give it time...

“Maybe the Wandering Jew - I mean, Santa - didn’t have such a happy childhood either,” says Joosh. “Maybe that’s why he does the gig? I mean, it’s not like our culture offers many examples of adult stations befitting a 2,000 year old man. People deserving immortality are usually martyred or, if they’re real lucky, Mel Brooks or Robin Williams.”

“2000 years? Listen, that story didn’t make the press until the 13th century,” says Wolfgang.

“Uh... the press didn’t make the, uh, press until the 13th century,” intrudes myself with what I imagine is a gently ballpeened hammer.

“Don’t drop it on your foot again, Oz,” suggests Wolfy. “That’s 15th century, not 13th.”

“Oh yeah. I always bounce the century number the wrong way. Anyway, it was in the 1400s...”

“...that Gutenberg got going -- but The Wandering Jew myth was first chronicled (that we know of) by Roger of Wendover and Matthew of Paris in the, eh, 1200s. The former was a monk and so was the latter. According to Encyclopaedia Brittannica 1947, the former was accused of ‘wasting his endowments’, whatever THAT means... while the latter was known as a vivid chronicler whose vividness often invoked blatant falsehoods, including falsifying the Magna Carta. Imagine Arnold Toynbee deliberately misquoting the Constitution.”

How does a guy carry the EB in his head, hip pocket, or iMac Powerbook? It’s all I can do to a) keep a buzz on, b) a flask of rum, or c) my PC from crashing Windows. Crashing windows. Is there somewhere a suite of debugging software called ‘Defenestrations’?

“Well, the story goes that the Wandering Jew was cursed to wander the earth for something like forever...”

“... till Judgement Day,” says Joosh.

“...because he mocked Jesus as He carried His cross to Calgary.”

“Yes, but in the various tellings of that myth, he was often not a Jew but... well, pick the demonized nationality/ethnic group infamous at a given time/locale,” Joosh tells us.

“OK. But let’s not forget that there is also another myth, the one wherefrom Santa got his name: St. Nicholas.”

Whoosh! The fire kicks up on that one, and the tell-tale tent lofts high above our heads, shining transparently like stained-glass windows letting moonlight through while glinting from firelight far, far below.

“Yeah,” says Joosh. “St. Nick is a recorded figure. Patron saint of children and sailors, especially shipwrecked sailors. ‘Shipwrecked sailors’ sounds like a fair description of Diaspora Jewry, if you ask me. Never knew what shore they’d be cast onto next.”

“Not to mention,” says I, “that St. Nicolas was also the poster child, er, wise old guy, of pawn shops, which get their 3-balls sign logo from the tale in which Nicolas threw 3 bags of money through a guy’s window...”

“De defenestrations!,” marauds Wolfy, doing a respectable Mel Brooks.

“... it was in Turkey, dude, and I’m sure they were open when he tossed them through, secretly, at night, which he did in order to prevent some guy from being forced to sell his daughters owing to poverty. Although it’s funny how secret acts become legends, eh?”

“Pawnshops!?,” exults Joosh. “And who are the pawnkeepers since antiquity, eh? Jews!”

“Well, it’s also claimed that the 3-balls logo derives from the coat of arms of the Medici cartel of Renaissance Italy,” informs Wolfgang.

“The merchants of Venice?,” says Joosh. “Where was Shylock when we needed him? Those cads deserved to have a few pounds of flesh carved from THEIR hides. But St. Nicolas would surely have no truck with those fellas. This is SANTA we’re talking about!”

We look around at each other, digging how our Jewish friend has become Santa’s main advocate. Wandering Jew or St. Nicholas, everyone’s gotta love this guy...

“Who was dead many centuries before the Medicis held sway - in Florence, not Venice. The point of placing a lens over the surface of history is to allow one to visually penetrate its depths, not reflect images of clouds in red velvet suits into the past,” says Wolfgang.

“Zez who?,” sez Cloggs. “ ‘Those who don’t study history are doomed to repeat it’, or so some famous wise guy said -- no, I don’t want to know WHO, Wolfy. You want to be the NEXT Wandering Jew? Denounce the Santa Saga? Knock a hole in our tent in the sky?”

“The not so sheltering sky,” says Snowcrane.

“Zazz right!,” shouts Cloggenhoofer. “Zizz myth ‘z our own, dammeet! We’re not arguing who was the Son of God or was He the True Messiah; we’re talking Sinter Klaus, and it takes all the hot air we can muster to keep THAT belly full enough to shake the world!”

“Like a bowl full of jelly,” I say.

“Amen,” says Wolfgang. “A mythofigure large enough to satisfy both the gaping maw of Madison Avenue AND the hearts of humans. Courtesy Clement Moore.”

“Zazz right!,” shouts Cloggenhoofer, just in time to catch his own echo bouncing back from the painted sky. “Humans! And who, I ask you, is gonna save humanity from itself?”

“God,” says Joosh.

“If you believe in zat ztuff, which I neither do nor don’t, dammeet. ET!! ET is my messiah! And I’m here to tell ya, fellaz, that Zanta’z a MARTIAN!!”

Looking up, we see, indeed, an unidentified flying object. Nah, ‘s too early. Like all good magic, believing is seeing...

Now fully framed but only partially colored in, with essential lines of perspective fable traced out like guy lines to a carnival canopy rendered in Early Cathedral Gothic, the sky gradually descends, brightening as it approaches, hunkering close to its fire and its tellers who each hold its corners in place by its tale. The fire, basking in its own reflected warmth, merries ever more crackily in the echoes of its reflected glow, while the sky, the now very sheltering sky, now close enough to touch, seems both as big as... as the sky, by cracky... yet only big enough: just right, like the littlest bear said. The fire shrinks too. One by one, they fall asleep, tucking their corner of the sky around them like a quilt fading from patchwork to black. The fire dwindles into collective unconsciousness, a frost of ashes or snow over its coals, too dim now to keep them warm nor to be seen from far away; but the blanket is now covered with stars become close enough to keep them warm.

Merry Hannukmas,

Kenmeer

P.S. I know I left out ye olde log cabin in the jungle Kwaanzat hut, but that’s a holiday still growing mythological wings, much like cargo cultist bamboo airplane models. Someday, in the approaching global economy, the Trobriand Islanders will make a name for themselves as makers and purveyors of the world’s finest bamboo and rattan fiber hang gliders and toy airplanes. Never underestimate the emergent power of myth.
<end>

I think red velvet bikinis and thongs, trimmed with a touch or ermine, are gonna be BIG this summer... especially with all those pleasantly overweight American bellies jiggling along the beach...

[ June 08, 2005, 01:54 PM: Message edited by: kenmeer livermaile ]
 
Posted by simplybiological (Member # 1344) on :
 
KE...
Just walking outside starts the sweatglands... how are you engaging in a sport that doesn't involve water?

I walk to and from school (bout a mile?) and I'm having to bring an extra tshirt with me to change into when I get here. That's just gross. I don't mind sweat/the heat when I'm in the field or something, but when you have to marinate in it all day, it's just nasty.

You know you live in the south when you make an audible sigh of relief when you walk into a building with AC. My lab has a cold room (think walk in refridgerator) and a number of people on this floor go stand in it when they first get here.

blech.
 
Posted by EDanaII (Member # 1062) on :
 
SB, my dear?

You don't know hot is until you've spent time in "The Zone."

I remember one time, driving from Phoenix, Az, to Heber, on a trip to visit my parents up in the mountains, just to get away from the summer heat. My car, before I even left town started smoking. My alternator burned out. From the heat. It was 122 degrees that day.

I hate this @#*& state! [Wink]

Ed.

Fixed typo.

[ June 08, 2005, 06:17 PM: Message edited by: EDanaII ]
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
Yeah, Ed, but that is a dry heat. [Wink] You need gills to breath outside here. [Mad] And I too hate this *&@% state. For reasons including and above and beyond the heat and humidity.

KE

[ June 08, 2005, 08:32 PM: Message edited by: KnightEnder ]
 
Posted by simplybiological (Member # 1344) on :
 
Honestly, Big Bend was 116 one day that i was there, and 116 and dry was far better than this 93 and swimming.
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
I am officially going to ask the Mod for a 'Sad' emoticon. Any others that we "really" need?

KE
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
I agree SB. I was in El Paso and 110 and climbing shore tanks wasn't as bad as walking around down here in Houston.

KE
 
Posted by Mabus (Member # 2471) on :
 
[Frown] Doesn't this constitute a "sad" emoticon? Or am I missing something important?
 
Posted by Funean (Member # 2345) on :
 
quote:
Any others that we "really" need?

I like the "grumble" graemlin.

I've just realized, also, that I really *love* the word grumble.
 
Posted by kenmeer livermaile (Member # 2243) on :
 
A grumblin.
 
Posted by Funean (Member # 2345) on :
 
OOOO! I like that!

Is it too late to change my theoretical avatar?
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
Mabus, that is a 'frown' emoticon, and Fun it's not too late.

KE
 
Posted by Funean (Member # 2345) on :
 
Excellent!

I always read the little eyebrows on the frown graemlin to be "sad" : [Frown] .

I think there is a "crying" graemlin out there; would that do better for your purposes?
 
Posted by EDanaII (Member # 1062) on :
 
@ KnightEnder

Yea, try it in 120 degree heat and tell me that. [Wink]

I'm tellin' ya, this state sux!

Ed.
 
Posted by javelin (Member # 1284) on :
 
Anyone else notice that Pete, Everard and Tom are duking it out on two seperate threads that no one is reading anymore, except for them? Is that Ornery or WHAT?
 
Posted by OpsanusTau (Member # 2350) on :
 
No, it's boring.
[Big Grin]
 
Posted by javelin (Member # 1284) on :
 
Well, ornery in a very borish way, yes. [Smile]

[ June 09, 2005, 05:26 PM: Message edited by: javelin ]
 
Posted by Pete at Home (Member # 429) on :
 
Borish?
 
Posted by Pete at Home (Member # 429) on :
 
I guess so. It's turning into a frightening sort of same-sex polyandry.
 
Posted by Funean (Member # 2345) on :
 
We need a corollary to Godwin's Law. [Big Grin]
 
Posted by kenmeer livermaile (Member # 2243) on :
 
Must be a bunch of attorneys getting drunk.
 
Posted by Funean (Member # 2345) on :
 
Ok, here is a shameless plug for my ex...2nd from the left in the wee little picture on this site.

Despite being 41 and not at all like these little girls [Smile] , she was invited to play guitar for them on the Warped Tour.

I can safely say, without exaggeration, that she is the most talented guitarist I've ever heard. She is proficient in any genre, including classical acoustic. She also plays piano, violin and bass, and composes classical music and jazz. This may be, after 38 years of playing guitar, her big break at last, or lead to it.

She's taken a leave from her job, closed down her house, and undertaken any number of financial and comfort sacrifices for this opportunity, so if you can stomach it at all, and the tour will be in a city close to you, check it out!

/end shameless misuse of forum [Smile]
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
Ken, everybody, check out the Ornery Political Party at OPP . (You down with OPP? Yeah, you know me! [Cool] )

KE

[ June 12, 2005, 08:13 PM: Message edited by: KnightEnder ]
 
Posted by cperry (Member # 1938) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by KnightEnder:
Ken, everybody, check out the Ornery Political Party at OPP . (You down with OPP? Yeah, you know me! [Cool] )

KE

Where do y'all find time for this??? I'm either so slow OR just overworked. (OK, I'm definitely overworked, but maybe I'm slow too!)
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
How many SSM threads is enough!!!?

KE
 
Posted by Funean (Member # 2345) on :
 
quote:
How many SSM threads is enough!!!?
Extremism in defense of marriage is no vice. Evidently. [Wink]

Fear not, I have retired, unless a new argument is put forth, or my proposed 2 tier system is addressed. I just can't type the same things over and over again.
 
Posted by kenmeer livermaile (Member # 2243) on :
 
"I just can't type the same things over and over again."

You don't have to anymore. Thanx to the magical power of digital information processing, you can just cut'n'paste...You don't have to anymore. Thanx to the magical power of digital information processing, you can just cut'n'paste...You don't have to anymore. Thanx to the magical power of digital information processing, you can just cut'n'paste...You don't have to anymore. Thanx to the magical power of digital information processing, you can just cut'n'paste...

I hear Jackson was acquitted. Fine by me. When all the dust has settled, I've heard far more (verified) good done for kids by Michael than (alleged) bad things.

See here for goodness and the decline thereof (but not a descent into any form of evil worse than, perhaps, insufficient attention span and an addiction to the life of a star.

The problems plaguing Michael are, I think, deep and profound and not pedestrian pedophilia. I don't think he abuses kids nor do I think there's a doggone thing wrong with a kid sleeping with him if the kid so chooses.

I think MJ is a very strange and uniquely gifted person who has ever lived in the domain of 'handlers'. I think he and Geirge W. Bush have a lot in common, but I think neither of them is a child molestor.
 
Posted by Funean (Member # 2345) on :
 
Amusingly, I'm up and typing, grumblingly, because of the dread Child In Bed. Having grown tired of being kicked in the head from 4 am on, I fled the bed that has been taken over by the wee invader at 5:30.
 
Posted by kenmeer livermaile (Member # 2243) on :
 
Oops, I forgot to post the link regarding Jackson (effectively former) charity work on behalf of starving children around the world.
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
Ken, change your medication.

KE
 
Posted by Funean (Member # 2345) on :
 
Perfect shrimp=

Juice of 3 limes
a smidge of sweet vermouth
a spoonful of brown sugar
butter
handful of cilantro
dash or two of hot sauce and some cayenne

Marinate an hour then grill till pink

mmmmmmmmmmmm [Smile]
 
Posted by The Drake (Member # 2128) on :
 
Perfect chocolate sauce=

4oz semi-sweet baking chocolate
4 TBSP Butter
1/4 cup water
1/4 cup sugar
dash salt

melt it over low heat, add vanilla extract for flavor, pour over vanilla ice cream.

Exercise extreme caution. May be habit forming.
 
Posted by Funean (Member # 2345) on :
 
quote:
pour over vanilla ice cream
heck, pour over anything...sounds divine.
 
Posted by kenmeer livermaile (Member # 2243) on :
 
"Ken, change your medication."

I stopped taking it slightly over a month ago. The bad withdrawal's over and I feel better than I have since I don't know when, but I still note difficulties.
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
Glad you're feeling better.

Stacy has made banana (vanilla) pudding with Vanilla Wafers three times in the last three days, and it is incredibly good. I'll try to get her to write down the recipe.

Drake, my grandma used to make something called 'chocolate gravy', and we'd eat it with biscuits. Umm.

KE
 
Posted by kenmeer livermaile (Member # 2243) on :
 
'nanner puddin'!

It fits inbetween peach/blueberry cobbler and fried chicken so rightly...
 
Posted by FiredrakeRAGE (Member # 1224) on :
 
More people need to post later at night (or earlier in the morning). I demand entertainment!

--Firedrake
 
Posted by javelin (Member # 1284) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Funean:
quote:
pour over vanilla ice cream
heck, pour over anything...sounds divine.
[Eek!] [Big Grin]
 
Posted by kenmeer livermaile (Member # 2243) on :
 
"More people need to post later at night (or earlier in the morning). I demand entertainment!"

A lone citizen sat in the Coliseum bleachers at midnight, loaf of bread in hand. The torches were all out. Occasionally, a lion's growl rumbled beneath his feet, sounding too loud and close in the silence. An elephant cleared its nose. A low murmuring marked a band of Xtians slated to be a central feature of tomorrow's entertainment.

But it was warm, still, the stone still releasing the day's heat. And the stars were grand...
 
Posted by Funean (Member # 2345) on :
 
Speaking of demanding entertainment, where are several of our denizens? Haggis, Jordan, LisaM., and several others who I can't think of at the moment are all (at least mostly; saw Haggis post today) MIA. And it looks like most of our new members have melted away; I know Lifewish is finishing up a semester, but the others--poof.

Also speaking of entertainment:

javelin, you don't remember? again? [Frown] (rushes off in tears)
 
Posted by javelin (Member # 1284) on :
 
You mean there was chocolate involved? Dammit! That's it! I'm going to see a doctor. Neurologist....
 
Posted by kenmeer livermaile (Member # 2243) on :
 
Speaking of missed folk: kidzmom, I miss you. I suspect you're busy crafting a novel and can't afford the slack in discipline that visiting here implis, but I wanted you to know I think of you and those happy kids and goaties often and kindly...
 
Posted by javelin (Member # 1284) on :
 
Is it me, or is it totally dead in here today [Frown] . I want my entertainment! *sigh*
 
Posted by Funean (Member # 2345) on :
 
I know, I'm reduced to actually *working.*

Ptui!
 
Posted by javelin (Member # 1284) on :
 
Give me a topic, I'll take a ridiculous position on it, and let's discuss! [Smile]
 
Posted by javelin (Member # 1284) on :
 
Do you think it'd piss everyone off if I went through the active threads, and marked the ones I care about, and the ones I don't?

Don't care...

Don't care...

Maybe....

Don't care...

[Wink]
 
Posted by The Drake (Member # 2128) on :
 
I'm waiting for the Next Big Quake. That'll be entertaining. California has had Four Big Quakes in one week.

So far, SF is spared, but maybe the Earth is building up to a grand finale.

[ June 17, 2005, 02:18 PM: Message edited by: The Drake ]
 
Posted by Funean (Member # 2345) on :
 
That would be a hoot, javelin, and I'm sure many of our more Serious Members would indeed get Very Angry.

Perhaps now would be a good time for a vacation to the heartland, Drake. Or the east coast. It's a little unnerving.

Hey, Drake, the er, "new member" is still posting away in similar vein over on WW. Check it out if you haven't already, jav! I have to leave and drive many places, but maybe you two could "address" the posts.
 
Posted by javelin (Member # 1284) on :
 
Well, I tried, Funean - the er, "new member" won't respond to anything. Burning troll - stinks, but it's better now than later...
 
Posted by A. Alzabo (Member # 1197) on :
 
quote:
Well, I tried, Funean - the er, "new member" won't respond to anything. Burning troll - stinks, but it's better now than later...
Anyone else think the "holy troller" is someone we know, having a little fun while OM's not looking?
 
Posted by javelin (Member # 1284) on :
 
Yes, yes I do.
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
Don't you love it when there is good music on the radio? (Or in this case the Retro 80's station on TV)

KE
 
Posted by A. Alzabo (Member # 1197) on :
 
javelin:
quote:
Yes, yes I do.
Congratulations on possibly the most positive alpha post ever on Ornery.

It's not one of you bored folks, is it?
 
Posted by The Drake (Member # 2128) on :
 
I've got the music of machinery in my ears. Leaf blowers, weed whackers, lawnmowers. I came home early after lunch thinking I'd work from home. I forgot what they do all day to make the grounds look good. I can barely think. Perfect frame of mind to take on that troll over there. It did respond to my Lincoln quote.
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
Like I said over there; if this is my kid again I'm going to turn him over my knee. I don't care how big he is.

KE
 
Posted by kenmeer livermaile (Member # 2243) on :
 
I only note that iago Pearl has no mailto function.

But I think 'troll' is over-used. This strikes me as more of an 'imp'. My guess is that it's OM venting frustration via some practical joking well-earned by putting up with Ornery for however long. Except that I think OM is capable of being at least a little more clever than stuff like:

"Through God's love, the doubters will be segregated and burned in Hellfire, twisting in their own feces forever. From safety in Heaven, OSC and we the saved will watch and laugh. The Rapture is coming!"

As trolls go, this one lacks enough weeny to waggle in our direction -- hence the booty shake feel to it all.

REAL trolls just walk up and slap you in the kisser with theirs.

's an imp.
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
They just played something off of The Clash's London Calling, then Under Pressuer by Queen and David Bowie, then something by the Ramones, and now Blondie. [Smile]

Do y'all think some days the music on the radio is better or you just notice it when your in a good mood? Which comes first the music or the mood? [Cool]

KE
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
Ahh, if only mine was long enough to slap people in the kisser with it... [Frown]

KE
 
Posted by javelin (Member # 1284) on :
 
I swear, if I were to use an alter-ego, it'd be Inigo Montoya, not Iago Pearl.
 
Posted by Dave at Work (Member # 1906) on :
 
Now how does that introduction of his go again?

"My name is Inigo Montoya..."

Gah, So this is how senility begins. I guess I will have to grab the DVD and watch it sometime this weekend.

--David
 
Posted by javelin (Member # 1284) on :
 
I'd be glad to go troll hunting, but it's hard when they aren't paying much attention. *sigh*
 
Posted by javelin (Member # 1284) on :
 
"Hello, my name is Inigo Montoya - you killed my father, prepare to die, you ugly troll!" (remove the troll part to find the movie quote)

[ June 17, 2005, 05:22 PM: Message edited by: javelin ]
 
Posted by Dave at Work (Member # 1906) on :
 
I started to go troll hunting, but I think I will wait out the weekend to see what he does before continuing. I am keeping my pointy stick in hand just in case though.

--David

[Edited for careless spelling errors missed because I was to quick to hit the Post button.]

[ June 17, 2005, 05:28 PM: Message edited by: Dave at Work ]
 
Posted by javelin (Member # 1284) on :
 
Good idea - everyone, grab your Mr. Pointy, and prepare to hunt vampires - well, after the weekend, of course. Don't want to miss out on the beach fun! 'Sides, you don't get paid if it's not during work hours!
 
Posted by Funean (Member # 2345) on :
 
Nice Princess Bride reference.

I can't believe it's serious, yet the ISPs apparently don't match any of ours.

I don't HAVE a Mr. Pointy...can I still go hunting? (I was going to use another verb, but that was too much, even for me [Wink] )
 
Posted by kenmeer livermaile (Member # 2243) on :
 
Ahh, if only mine was long enough to slap people in the kisser with it...

Try this:
The One True Device that Really REALLY Works

If that doesn't work, or seems unreasonable, do like Cookie Monster and recite these magic words:
Three Times 3X Bigger

It is alleged by some in the Pacific Northwest that eating the Mushu Pork served at this restaurant in Portland will help:
Sum Hung High

Sum Hung Low

Cookie Monster recommends this device:

Professor Long Bong's Extendotronic Magnifier

Real trolls on their way to the router bridges of their area:

Hi Ho Hung Low It's Off To Work We Go

A mere imp:

Is That Hot Air In Your Pocket or Is He Just Really Happy To Be Seen?
 
Posted by kenmeer livermaile (Member # 2243) on :
 
"I don't HAVE a Mr. Pointy...can I still go hunting? (I was going to use another verb, but that was too much, even for me"

Ma'am, you are the BAIT.
 
Posted by Dave at Work (Member # 1906) on :
 
Funean,

A sharp stick will work in a pinch. You can fix any problem with the proper application of a sharp stick. [Smile]

--David
 
Posted by FiredrakeRAGE (Member # 1224) on :
 
Dave at Work -

...and duct tape.

--Firedrake
 
Posted by Funean (Member # 2345) on :
 
I know, I will use my tapered reamer!

(a wonderful tool, with an even more wonderful name)
 
Posted by Dave at Work (Member # 1906) on :
 
Of course duct tape. I thought that went without saying. [Big Grin]

--David
 
Posted by kenmeer livermaile (Member # 2243) on :
 
"I know, I will use my tapered reamer!

(a wonderful tool, with an even more wonderful name)"

Also known in South AMerica as a Cold'n'Deep Noser (apologies to Jerry Clower):

Why Outhouses Have Doors That Latch

A Nose By Any Other Name Wouldst Still be Unwelcome There

Read Instructions Before Using
 
Posted by Dave at Work (Member # 1906) on :
 
Ah, but does anyone here have experience handling one in a hunt? Maybe someone with experience in fox hunting could be of use in handling the Tapirs. Or do we just use it for troll bait? [Smile]
 
Posted by Funean (Member # 2345) on :
 
Horrible thought for the day:

What if it's OSC?
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
Actually Fun, Mr. Pointy was weilded by a woman. And I always need help from a woman with mine. [Embarrassed]

You seem like a nice fellow, I hate to kill you.

You seem like a nice fellow, I hate to die.

KE
 
Posted by Funean (Member # 2345) on :
 
Hee!

So I took my tapered reamer on over there, and posted one of my Revoltingly Proper missives, on the off chance this is a real person posting er, seriously.

We shall see.

[ June 17, 2005, 06:28 PM: Message edited by: Funean ]
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
You made a good point concerning the no trolling rule. Theorectically I guess the OM could ban him just for that, if he doesn't even try to adhere to the forum rules? Probably he will just go away before them. If I wasn't so bored today, and in a good mood, I'd have already started ignoring him. I apologize to everybody for encouraging such boorish behavior.

KE
 
Posted by Dave at Work (Member # 1906) on :
 
Sometimes it is fun to poke at something new to see how it will react. Usually it get boring after a while though.

--David
 
Posted by erik the awful (Member # 2347) on :
 
...depends on the shape, size and varity of the reactions [Big Grin]
 
Posted by Funean (Member # 2345) on :
 
Hmmm, alls quiet on the WW front.

KE, that was one of your better "invisible man in the sky" posts over there (don't want to seem to be failing to drip with niceness--heehee--so I'm mentioning it here). Haven't seen that term in a while--I thought maybe you were going all soft and gooey. [Smile]
 
Posted by kenmeer livermaile (Member # 2243) on :
 
Hmmm... our friend Iago's posts seem to have tapered. Whereas, before, he was posting reams of stuff.

I submit myself to the usual punishment for bad puns but, before I receive my walloping, may I please be allowed to wear these bun pads? So that they might, um, pad my buns?

1]Ow!
2]Ow!
3]Ow!
4]Ow!
5]Ow!
6]Ow!
7]Ow!
8]Ow!

They holler out, "Beat me Daddy, eight to the bar"
 
Posted by kenmeer livermaile (Member # 2243) on :
 
...which reminds me., cperry, although I;ve not fawned at your sveltvette ankles for awhile, I still think that

a) You are exquisite, radiating quietly restrained heat like a blackbox with a Planck roof on a brick house, and

b) You are the reigning punster of us all.

I submit the following summer camp craft project for rainy days:

We challenge each other to bouts-rimes , twisted, like an Ouroborosian Moebius twist, into a boustrophedon format, with massive bonus points for every conundrum revealed within, and Absolute Grand Prize for Concealed Conundra.

After which, once the sun comes out, and our belts are plenty Injun-beaded, we indulge a game of beating the bounds.

Sort of a Capture the Flag played in the marked territory of the Ornery Rules. (No, I am NOT serious about the Beating of the Bounds proposition, but methinks that the first suggestion might prove meritorious.

Meritorious-glorious
Final-vinyl
Magic-tragic
Peeder-repeater
Qunatum-want'em.

In any order so chosen, however. Such a challenge requires some laxity.
 
Posted by simplybiological (Member # 1344) on :
 
I just had houseguests for 4 days... eesh. i was really excited about these people coming, i've known one of them for half my life (literally) and she was bringing along some friends, one i knew and two i didn't. one of the unknowns turned out to be a known, he sat a couple seats behind me in a latin class and i had a rude nickname (in my mind) for him... he didn't crash at my place, so no big. the other unknown proceded to F-R-E-A-K out that we had snakes in the house and like, wouldn't come in. I gave her the usual, "none of them are poisonous, they can't get out of the cages, you're sleeping as far away from them as possible" and she just kept carrying on about how she wouldn't have come if she knew there were snakes... i finally said, "look, either get a hotel or shut up." i hate to start things like that, but really, what am i supposed to do?
She's a nice girl, but she was relatively high maintanence the whole time and i can't stand prima donna behavior.
other than that, it was fun. we ate our way around austin and i have enough leftovers for a small army. glad to have the quiet back, though.
 
Posted by Funean (Member # 2345) on :
 
High maintenance uninvited tangential guests are very close to The Thing That Wouldn't Leave on the list of houseguests from hell.

Shoulda put a rubber snake in her room. Or the bathroom.
 
Posted by Funean (Member # 2345) on :
 
Must see TV: Laugh Whore, Mario Cantone.

Funniest thing I've seen in, oh, years.

Showtime, at least; it might be seeable elsewhere.

But it's really, really funny standup.
 
Posted by simplybiological (Member # 1344) on :
 
she had zero sense of humor about her irrational fear. had we done this i'm pretty sure she would have slept in the car.

i am irrationally repelled by birds, but i have a sense of humor AND a sense of perspective about it.

in other news, i have a fire ant bite on the top of my foot that itches like you would. not. believe. fire ants severely test my love for insects.

[ June 18, 2005, 10:01 PM: Message edited by: simplybiological ]
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
Fun, Thanks. I'm an agnostic, atheist, or Satan worshipper depending on the Christian. He did bring up an interesting point, how are the rest of us going to divide up all the stuff, after the Ratpure? Perhaps we should start calling dibs? We should give Never Land to Richard. (What? MJ's a Jehova's Witness, surely he'll be on the first cloud outta here?) Anybody else got anything they want to call dibs on?

SB, my sons and I watched "Killer Ants" on the Discovery Channel tonight and I thought of you. (They made me miss the end of the Stros game. Kids!)

Ken, I'm thinking.

[ June 18, 2005, 11:13 PM: Message edited by: KnightEnder ]
 
Posted by Funean (Member # 2345) on :
 
The Ornery Rapture Project.

We should get a jumpstart on this, since we're already half-assedly organized. Hey, we've got a good start on the provisional government!

First, since we have to assume OSC's going to be going, someone's either got to get over there and assume responsibility for the server, or else it's all gotta be moved to another one. Unfortunately, I think javelin will be departing as well, so his generous offer will not help, although I'm sure he'd bequeath us the equipment. He owes me, after all.

Second, we've got to figure out how many of us are staying; figure all the Jews, so Ev, RickyB, Hannibal, and who am I forgetting? Then there's the agnostics and athiests and rank sinners: you, me, sb (I think), kenmeer without a doubt, Richard...who else? I'm hoping that the post-Rapture bonanza and trunk sale will keep at least some of the agnostics from repenting and leaving the rest of us with all the clean up.

Hopefully we won't waste valuable years drinking up all the beer and good scotch.

Then we'll need to make a detailed map of the entire world and get a whole lot of colored pushpins.

I already put dibs on Graceland on WW.

[ June 18, 2005, 11:41 PM: Message edited by: Funean ]
 
Posted by Funean (Member # 2345) on :
 
Benedryl gel, simplybio.

It's a miracle substance.
 
Posted by kenmeer livermaile (Member # 2243) on :
 
"Ken, I'm thinking."

Troublemaker, you are.
 
Posted by Funean (Member # 2345) on :
 
Happy Father's Day, all you dads!
 
Posted by simplybiological (Member # 1344) on :
 
you know, come to think of it, the rapture would be an excellent human population control, at least for certain parts of the world.

funean, i ALREADY waste valuable years drinking up all the beer and scotch, why should i change now?

in this post-rapture world, can i be in charge of happy hour, fuzzy kitty cats, and indie rock bands? if a band wanted to make it, they'd have to make offerings to me, the patron saint of commerical success... if a bar did not offer good drink and appetizer specials, i could curse them with a plague of insects.

oh crap, i also want to be in charge of insects. and the weather. greedy, greedy.
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
Thanks Fun.

SB, sounds good to me. I guess me, you, and Zyne can split Texas, though Austin is the only part worth keeping.

I think we should institute a three day work week, followed by three days of partying, and one to sleep in on. (Since you are in charge of the weather I would appreciate rain on Sundays when we are sleeping in. And if it's okay with Fun we'll have all the OA member parties at Graceland. I guess California really want change at all.

KE

[ June 19, 2005, 12:26 PM: Message edited by: KnightEnder ]
 
Posted by Funean (Member # 2345) on :
 
KE, Texas should improve a great deal after the Rapture, by your lights. [Big Grin]

And that's why I wanted Graceland. [Smile] I'll start cooking now, avoid the rush.
 
Posted by simplybiological (Member # 1344) on :
 
I'm keeping austin, thankyouverymuch, i'm the one who lives here. I also annex monahans state park, port aransis, dolan falls, and oasis ranch. the rest is y'alls. it's gonna keep work to keep the hippie population under control here and i'm up to the task.

i also want to be in charge of migas. i suspect no one outside of texas is qualified to challenge me on this.
 
Posted by The Drake (Member # 2128) on :
 
You guys can have the real property. But I want control and title of all the church buses.
 
Posted by cperry (Member # 1938) on :
 
Oi, I am so far behind! A couple things:
1) Yes, radios have good days and bad. But the listener's mood def plays a role. Hard to go wrong with classic 80s.

2) Crazy guest flipping over the snakes? Make her sleep on the porch. Egad, I hate girls like that. Gives the rest of us a bad rap.

3) Not sure I believe in the Rapture, so guess I'll be stuck here if it actually happens (despite my calling myself a Christian -- this forum has made me really rethink a lot of my beliefs!). Can I play?

4) Ken, your aspirations may be a bit high for the rest of us. How 'bout we start simple and progress from there?
 
Posted by Funean (Member # 2345) on :
 
Of course you can play, cperry! What would you like? There's not much taken yet, although the entirety of Texas seems to be under contract.
 
Posted by cperry (Member # 1938) on :
 
As much as I appreciate the idea of Texas, I'd rather have something not quite so ... hot. VA is working pretty well for me, although I've often imagined what fun I could have with 10000 acres and 100 bison somewhere in Idaho or Wyoming. I don't think that bison will disappear in the Rapture, do you?
 
Posted by Funean (Member # 2345) on :
 
No, I think they're pretty sinful. What with all that herd behavior, who knows what all they get up to.

I think the Mid-Atlantic seaboard is pretty much up for grabs. I wouldn't mind a time share, say the Delaware/MD coast, but you're certainly welcome to the rest of it. Maybe you can do something with New Jersey. I daresay it won't depopulate too much.
 
Posted by cperry (Member # 1938) on :
 
Thanks. NJ just doesn't appeal to me at all. Maybe I don't know enough about it.

I guess I'd rather go a bit farther south -- North Carolina, perhaps? Coastline is nice, now that you mention it.

Yeah, those wild animals are pretty...wild, huh?
 
Posted by kenmeer livermaile (Member # 2243) on :
 
"4) Ken, your aspirations may be a bit high for the rest of us. How 'bout we start simple and progress from there?"

a) An old mentor/boss told me, "It's a lot easier to tone it down than turn it up. Start at the top and work your way down, son."

b) We all know you underestimate yourself even as you overestimate me.

c) Your ankles taste different, somehow. You been taking whipped cream baths or something? (I enjoy being a dog. Dropped onion rings, ladies' ankles, lost copies of The Stars My Destination behind the radiator...)
 
Posted by cperry (Member # 1938) on :
 
"You been taking whipped cream baths or something"

Bathing in dark chocolate lately.

Exfoliating with shredded coconut.
 
Posted by kenmeer livermaile (Member # 2243) on :
 
Shredded coconut.

I been on a beauty regimen too. Bathing in dirty creek water, rolling in used hamster excelsior. The chow bitch down the street thinks I smell... smelly. Her kind of mutt.
 
Posted by Funean (Member # 2345) on :
 
I think I like cperry's better....but I'm sure that's just me. [Wink]
 
Posted by kenmeer livermaile (Member # 2243) on :
 
"I think I like cperry's better....but I'm sure that's just me."

Dogs are allergic to chocolate.
 
Posted by Funean (Member # 2345) on :
 
I'm not. [Smile]

Too bad for you.
 
Posted by javelin (Member # 1284) on :
 
Yes, I can apparantly attest to the fact that Funean is not allergic to chocolate [Smile] .
 
Posted by cperry (Member # 1938) on :
 
Kenmeer smells...smelly.

My hair color has been described as "hair-colored."

I kinda like these descriptors. They're...adjective (you have to pronounce it with the emphasis on "jec" not on "ad").

Any more?
 
Posted by kenmeer livermaile (Member # 2243) on :
 
"My hair color has been described as "hair-colored."

And they're OFF! Tautology Twisters proudly presents the double meaning contest!

The bores bored in on her...
 
Posted by cperry (Member # 1938) on :
 
...when she nailed her nail...
 
Posted by cperry (Member # 1938) on :
 
...entranced by her entrance...
 
Posted by Funean (Member # 2345) on :
 
...and she affected an affect...
 
Posted by cperry (Member # 1938) on :
 
...which caused him to intimate intimate suggestions...
 
Posted by cperry (Member # 1938) on :
 
...saying, "How could you object to this manly object?"
 
Posted by cperry (Member # 1938) on :
 
and asking, "When did you implant those bodacious implants?"
 
Posted by cperry (Member # 1938) on :
 
and whispering, "I'd like to mouth your mouth."
 
Posted by Funean (Member # 2345) on :
 
{waits for KL to notice these entries) (hee hee!)
 
Posted by kenmeer livermaile (Member # 2243) on :
 
It is such a pleasure to be shut down by you, ma'am!

Work your fingers to the bone, wadya get?????

BONEY FINGERS!!!!

Hoyt Axton gets credit for that one, I think.
 
Posted by cperry (Member # 1938) on :
 
(I'm just another degenerate degenerate.)
 
Posted by simplybiological (Member # 1344) on :
 
so... how long has the "jump to new posts" linky link been there?

because damn, that's NICE.
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
What "jump to new posts" linky?

KE
 
Posted by The Drake (Member # 2128) on :
 
top of page, left, is jump to new posts.

My favorite discovery was "Today's active topics"
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
How long has that been there?

KE
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
Wow! I never go to that page, I have General Comments bookmarked as a favorite, so I never saw that before. Has it always been there? Thanks SB and Drake for pointing them out.

KE
 
Posted by Funean (Member # 2345) on :
 
*Ahem*

Shameless Plug, Part Two.

At 41, she is the band mommy, and goes to bed at 10. [Smile]
 
Posted by javelin (Member # 1284) on :
 
Alright, the board died. Is it my fault again?
 
Posted by OpsanusTau (Member # 2350) on :
 
My excuses are 1)doing work and 2)looking up recipes about whole trout, which my neighbor (bless his sweet heart) says he will bring us a bunch of this weekend, and I am totally excited about.
 
Posted by Wayward Son (Member # 210) on :
 
You know, I've never posted on the Misc. Chat thread.

OK. Scratch one more off my "To Do" list.
 
Posted by OpsanusTau (Member # 2350) on :
 
Sure is quiet out here today.

[the sound of lake waters lapping with low sounds on the shore]
 
Posted by javelin (Member # 1284) on :
 
Damn it. I wasn't jealous about the trout, or the work (I don't like either), but dammit! I need a vacation - lake waters lapping with low sounds on the shore! I just about got up and left my day job.
 
Posted by OpsanusTau (Member # 2350) on :
 
I loves me some Yeats, I do.

Makes me want to live alone in the bee-loud glade.

A moment of poetry, for everyone (because once I've started with the Yeats it's hard for me to stop):
quote:
I WILL arise and go now, and go to Innisfree,
And a small cabin build there, of clay and wattles made:
Nine bean-rows will I have there, a hive for the honeybee,
And live alone in the bee-loud glade.

And I shall have some peace there, for peace comes dropping slow,
Dropping from the veils of the morning to where the cricket sings;
There midnight's all a glimmer, and noon a purple glow,
And evening full of the linnet's wings.

I will arise and go now, for always night and day
I hear lake water lapping with low sounds by the shore;
While I stand on the roadway, or on the pavements grey,
I hear it in the deep heart's core.


 
Posted by Richard Dey (Member # 1727) on :
 
Oh blessed are the buses
on the tarmack hot and black
that take us and our cusses
to that leaky country shack.

Oh curse that damned mosquito
in that stanky outhouse so
allegro con spirito
that our faith went incognito.

Oh ...

Profane are all our cusses
on the tarmack cold and black
... [1 cussword per passenger] ...
that takes us on our busses
back to basics and the sack.

(Anon.: Old Unitarian hymn.)
 
Posted by The Drake (Member # 2128) on :
 
There once was a man from Nantucket....
 
Posted by javelin (Member # 1284) on :
 
quote:

A Line-Storm Song

The line-storm clouds fly tattered and swift.
The road is forlorn all day,
Where a myriad snowy quartz stones lift,
And the hoof-prints vanish away.
The roadside flowers, too wet for the bee,
Expend their bloom in vain.
Come over the hills and far with me,
And be my love in the rain.

The birds have less to say for themselves
In the wood-world's torn despair
Than now these numberless years the elves,
Although they are no less there:
All song of the woods is crushed like some
Wild, earily shattered rose.
Come, be my love in the wet woods, come,
Where the boughs rain when it blows.

There is the gale to urge behind
And bruit our singing down,
And the shallow waters aflutter with wind
From which to gather your gown.
What matter if we go clear to the west,
And come not through dry-shod?
For wilding brooch shall wet your breast
The rain-fresh goldenrod.

Oh, never this whelming east wind swells
But it seems like the sea's return
To the ancient lands where it left the shells
Before the age of the fern;
And it seems like the time when after doubt
Our love came back amain.
Oh, come forth into the storm and rout
And be my love in the rain.

-- Robert Frost

It's about to get stormy here in my beloved Portland - anyone want to join me for a walk?
 
Posted by Funean (Member # 2345) on :
 
I would if I were there!

I truly love thunderstorms. Right now we are having a drenching rainstorm, but sadly no thunder. And I love that poem, too. Robert Frost rocks. My dad used to read me his poems as bedtime stories.
 
Posted by Funean (Member # 2345) on :
 
Did anyone else hear the reason why the Utah Scout wasn't found for four days?

He hid from the searchers because he was afraid someone would steal him.

That broke my heart.
 
Posted by simplybiological (Member # 1344) on :
 
it hasn't rained here in... i don't know how long. not remotely recently.

quote:
since feeling is first
who pays any attention
to the syntax of things
will never wholly kiss you;

wholly to be a fool
while Spring is in the world

my blood approves,
and kisses are a better fate
than wisdom
lady i swear by all flowers. Don't cry
- the best gesture of my brain is less than
your eyelids' flutter which says

we are for each other; then
laugh, leaning back in my arms
for life's not a paragraph

And death i think is no parenthesis

-ee cummings.
 
Posted by Funean (Member # 2345) on :
 
oh, maaan. Don't get me started. I have about a hundred "very favorite" e.e. cummings poems.

Hey! We could have a cite-off!

"somewhere i have never travelled, gladly beyond
any experience, your eyes have their silence:
in your most frail gesture are things which enclose me,
or which i cannot touch because they are too near..."
 
Posted by The Drake (Member # 2128) on :
 
quote:
Do Not Go Gentle into That Good Night

Do not go gentle into that good night,
Old age should burn and rave at close of day;
Rage, rage against the dying of the light.

Though wise men at their end know dark is right,
Because their words had forked no lightning they
Do not go gentle into that good night.

Good men, the last wave by, crying how bright
Their frail deeds might have danced in a green bay,
Rage, rage against the dying of the light.

Wild men who caught and sang the sun in flight,
And learn, too late, they grieved it on its way,
Do not go gentle into that good night.

Grave men, near death, who see with blinding sight
Blind eyes could blaze like meteors and be gay,
Rage, rage against the dying of the light.

And you, my father, there on the sad height,
Curse, bless, me now with your fierce tears, I pray.
Do not go gentle into that good night.
Rage, rage against the dying of the light.

-- Dylan Thomas
 
Posted by Funean (Member # 2345) on :
 
The whole thing...

quote:
somewhere i have never travelled, gladly beyond
any experience, your eyes have their silence:
in your most frail gesture are things which enclose me,
or which i cannot touch because they are too near

your slightest look easily will unclose me
though i have closed myself as fingers,
you open always petal by petal myself as Spring opens
(touching skilfully, mysteriously) her first rose

or if your wish be to close me, i and
my life will shut very beautifully, suddenly,
as when the heart of this flower imagines
the snow carefully everywhere descending;

nothing which we are to perceive in this world equals
the power of your intense fragility: whose texture
compels me with the colour of its countries,
rendering death and forever with each breathing

(i do not know what it is about you that closes
and opens; only something in me understands
the voice of your eyes is deeper than all roses)
nobody, not even the rain, has such small hands

-- e. e. cummings
 
Posted by simplybiological (Member # 1344) on :
 
fun...

quote:
you shall above all things be glad and young
For if you're young,whatever life you wear

it will become you;and if you are glad
whatever's living will yourself become.
Girlboys may nothing more than boygirls need:
i can entirely her only love

whose any mystery makes every man's
flesh put space on;and his mind take off time

that you should ever think,may god forbid
and (in his mercy) your true lover spare:
for that way knowledge lies,the foetal grave
called progress,and negation's dead undoom.

I'd rather learn from one bird how to sing
than teach ten thousand stars how not to dance



 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
Not sure what we are doing but I love the St Crispin's Day Speech, from Shakespeares "Henry V".

We few, we happy few, we band of brothers;
For he to-day that sheds his blood with me
Shall be my brother; be he ne'er so vile,
This day shall gentle his condition;
And gentlemen in England now-a-bed
Shall think themselves accurs'd they were not here,
And hold their manhoods cheap whiles any speaks
That fought with us upon Saint Crispin's day.


And Hamlet's Soliloquy.

HAMLET

To be, or not to be: that is the question:
Whether 'tis nobler in the mind to suffer
The slings and arrows of outrageous fortune,
Or to take arms against a sea of troubles,
And by opposing end them? To die: to sleep;
No more; and by a sleep to say we end
The heart-ache and the thousand natural shocks
That flesh is heir to, 'tis a consummation
Devoutly to be wish'd. To die, to sleep;
To sleep: perchance to dream: ay, there's the rub;
For in that sleep of death what dreams may come
When we have shuffled off this mortal coil,
Must give us pause: there's the respect
That makes calamity of so long life;
For who would bear the whips and scorns of time,
The oppressor's wrong, the proud man's contumely,
The pangs of despised love, the law's delay,
The insolence of office and the spurns
That patient merit of the unworthy takes,
When he himself might his quietus make
With a bare bodkin? who would fardels bear,
To grunt and sweat under a weary life,
But that the dread of something after death,
The undiscover'd country from whose bourn
No traveller returns, puzzles the will
And makes us rather bear those ills we have
Than fly to others that we know not of?
Thus conscience does make cowards of us all;


That whole soliloquy so perfectly sums up the human condition. Beautiful.

KE

[ June 22, 2005, 10:01 PM: Message edited by: KnightEnder ]
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
One of our newest members< Ace, said he found us after we were "Farked". I guess this is the story to which he is referring.

The Riots of the Faithful People there didn't seem to embrace OSC. Shocker.

KE
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
I am halfway through with Greg Bear's newest book "Darwin's Children" and it is great so far. Anybody else, besides Funean, read it or its predecessor "Darwin's Radio" (Also a great book)?

KE
 
Posted by javelin (Member # 1284) on :
 
Read 'em both, liked 'em both. I'm a big Greg Bear fan.
 
Posted by javelin (Member # 1284) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by KnightEnder:
One of our newest members< Ace, said he found us after we were "Farked". I guess this is the story to which he is referring.

The Riots of the Faithful People there didn't seem to embrace OSC. Shocker.

KE

Yes, and quality comments they are. Slashdot and fark seem to have a lot in common - "Me2!" "Nah ah!" "Yes2!" "Your momma!" "He sucks!" "Look at me post a comment!" "I'm KEWL!" "No you aren't!" "Look, I posted a cartoon!"
 
Posted by aceboy911 (Member # 2511) on :
 
Yes javelin, that is where I heard of you guys, and you have to admit, the people over there in the fark forums have a point, as I am sure has been stated here many a time: Most people over there are too poor and too over-burdened to read Newsweek, and on top of that, why would they be reading an American News Journal? Most probably think we are opppressive pigs and would sooner wipe their arse with the newsweek than read it for the content. The rest of them probably have difficulty reading english (I say english b/c the one picture I saw of people burning flags and such were waving a copy of newsweek around that was in English, How they got it, or even understood it is beyond me-Media maybe?) Not that the thin paper of the newsweek would make good wiping material [Roll Eyes] . Who knows, maybe the afghanis really do read stuff that comes fromt the U.S. seems like a stretch though.

As to the intelligence of the people coming from fark [Smile] well, I guess you will just have to judge;)
 
Posted by The Drake (Member # 2128) on :
 
This is a little unstable:

"I have an autographed poster from Orson Scott Card that is signed to me. I am burning it as soon as I get home. If you want it, email me. It's gone at midnight EST." - logistic

If you were burning a poster because you were so mad, why would you be willing to give it to someone? And does the person posting expect to get home at precisely midnight, because I thought they planned to burn it as soon as they got home?

So confusing....

Reminds me of Lewis Black's standup routine, in which he speculated that anyeurisms were caused by hearing something so incredibly stupid that it bounces around in your brain until a blood vessel bursts.
 
Posted by The Drake (Member # 2128) on :
 
I have to say, though, I posted some really shallow rants on IRC until I saw the light of actual dialogue here.
 
Posted by simplybiological (Member # 1344) on :
 
Drake, don't feel bad... I had a ten minute discussion tonight about the following topic:

"Hey guys, I'm having coffee with a hunky blonde guy tomorrow. I'm wearing this skirt, but with a blue tshirt with a cute design on it... so... CARDIGAN OR NO CARDIGAN? and flip flops or these shoes?"

I honestly did. I wear rhinestones ironically, blow dry my hair, and put thought into what purse I will carry. It's gross, it's shallow, and I totally confess to doing it...
 
Posted by Funean (Member # 2345) on :
 
I love me a good shallow rant.

But yes, it becomes a little like a
diet of, well, Froot Loops, all by itself.

SB, isn't it a million degrees down there? Why, oh why, would a cardigan ever enter the discussion? But I agree that when wearing a t-shirt with a skirt, the question of shoes becomes critical for establishing the difference between quirky'n'stylin' and slatternly.

Shoes are just that important.
 
Posted by javelin (Member # 1284) on :
 
quote:
As to the intelligence of the people coming from fark [Smile] well, I guess you will just have to judge;)
No idea how SMART they are, but the posting style, well, let's just say it's not useful to me, when it comes to actually understanding an issue.
 
Posted by aceboy911 (Member # 2511) on :
 
Well, luckily, I do not go to fark for the forums, never been in there actually. I go there for the offbeat news. they usually have some pretty funny stuff.
 
Posted by javelin (Member # 1284) on :
 
Well, we all know that even if you CAN post like the farkers, you can also post like an Ornerian, and that makes you fine by me [Smile]
 
Posted by aupton15 (Member # 1771) on :
 
Just encountered something a little beyond stupid. I'm sure many of you have witnessed dumb people smoking while filling their car up at the gas station. Mind-numbingly dumb, and all too common. I just saw, not one, not two, but three gas station EMPLOYEES smoking while leaning against a gas pump. Do employees not get the "Gas is flammable" speech when they're hired?
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
Did y'all see that news show showing several people catching on fire at the pump? And they weren't even smoking. Static electricity. The thing to remember, that they did not, was don't pull the hose our of the car if it catches fire. That just turns it into a flame thrower. Oh, and stop drop and roll.

KE
 
Posted by The Drake (Member # 2128) on :
 
Actually, it is not as crazy as it seems. It is actually quite difficult to set fire to gasoline with a cigarette. Still not recommended, though.

Proof
 
Posted by simplybiological (Member # 1344) on :
 
Fun-
Two reasons- nay, THREE- why a cardigan would come into it, in order of importance/relevance.

1. Blazing hot outside = businesses set A/C on arctic. I'm pretty sure it's going to start snowing in some of the UT lecture halls. I carry a cardigan everywhere because you go outside and sweat, then go inside and are in danger of frostbite. Therefore, if said coffee situation is indoors, a cardigan is a totally reasonable article of clothing. See also, useful for hiding that you've sweat through the back of your tshirt.

2. When it's 105 degrees outside, it doesn't matter if you're naked, you're going to be hot. It doesn't make a WHOLE lot of difference what you're wearing (this is also my answer to the question, "how the hell are you wearing jeans in this weather?"), so therefore you might as well...

3. Look good. If the benefit in aesthetics is greater than the loss of comfort, then YAY!

It's mostly 1, though. Honestly.
 
Posted by Funean (Member # 2345) on :
 
quote:
3. Look good. If the benefit in aesthetics is greater than the loss of comfort, then YAY!

I'm totally down with this.

It's the principle that makes yummy high heels possible.
 
Posted by javelin (Member # 1284) on :
 
I keep thinking you are talking about some sort of snack food, Funean, when you say "yummy high heels". Or a foot fetish... then again, you COULD combine them....
 
Posted by Funean (Member # 2345) on :
 
You're just trying to get at me with the chocolate again. Never again, I say!
 
Posted by javelin (Member # 1284) on :
 
How about edible high heels? Really, really fashionable ones? [Razz]

[ June 23, 2005, 02:45 PM: Message edited by: javelin ]
 
Posted by EDanaII (Member # 1062) on :
 
That's just devious, Javelin...

But I LIKE it! I LIKE IT! [Smile]

Ed.
 
Posted by javelin (Member # 1284) on :
 
If only it worked more often. *sigh*
 
Posted by simplybiological (Member # 1344) on :
 
quote:
How about edible high heels?
gross. they'd be all footy and dirty if you wore them, and if you didn't... well, what's the point?
 
Posted by A. Alzabo (Member # 1197) on :
 
SB:
quote:
...they'd be all footy and dirty if you wore them...
There's people that, ummmm... like that.

Not that there's anything wrong with that...
 
Posted by kenmeer livermaile (Member # 2243) on :
 
When heels (like myself, for example) are high, almost EVERYthing seems edible.
 
Posted by A. Alzabo (Member # 1197) on :
 
I'd rather be well-heeled than high heeled.
 
Posted by The Drake (Member # 2128) on :
 
*Ugh* Foot dirt. That's nasty.
 
Posted by javelin (Member # 1284) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by simplybiological:
quote:
How about edible high heels?
gross. they'd be all footy and dirty if you wore them, and if you didn't... well, what's the point?
Do you think people where edible underwear all day long?
 
Posted by The Drake (Member # 2128) on :
 
I also question the structural integrity of chocolate heels, even for Calista Flockhart. Certainly not stilettos.

And chocolate moon-boots just wouldn't work...
 
Posted by simplybiological (Member # 1344) on :
 
all the edible underwear i've ever seen looks like an underwear shaped fruit roll-up, which i just wouldn't think... yeah. no. Do people wear it AT ALL?

chocolate flip flops, maybe?
 
Posted by EDanaII (Member # 1062) on :
 
I saw chocolate body paint the other day.

Mmmm... Chocolate covered marshmallows...

[coughs]

Ed.
 
Posted by The Drake (Member # 2128) on :
 
Buh. Let's skip the candy footwear entirely.

Also, the underwear. Does anyone REALLY need extra incentive to get involved with that area?
 
Posted by The Drake (Member # 2128) on :
 
Well, that's just great. I was building up to a scrumtrulescent post number 2000, and I blew right by it.
 
Posted by FiredrakeRAGE (Member # 1224) on :
 
I passed 1000 a while ago, and never even noticed.

--Firedrake
 
Posted by kenmeer livermaile (Member # 2243) on :
 
"Put er' there, pal. Pleased to metcha. My name is Wally Walters with the Walla Walla waterfall maunfacturing company in Walla Walla Washington."

Try saying THAT with a pair od edible undies in your mouth.
 
Posted by javelin (Member # 1284) on :
 
Why would you need to say that while eating edible undies? *mind is whirring*
 
Posted by OpsanusTau (Member # 2350) on :
 
Prm rr mrblr, prl. Plsh mr msh. Mmrrnrm sh Wrbl Wrbplsh wrshsh Wrbl Wrbl wrblfl mrfrshng crmpl nn [swallows] Walla Walla Washington.

Yuk.
Why, I ask, do they make edible panties so...inedible?
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
Tastes like fruit roll ups too. Or at least it used to.

I don't know about edible high-heels, but high-heels in bed are pretty sexy.

Congratulations Drake and FiredrakeRage! [Smile] [Big Grin] [Wink] [Cool] [Smile] [Big Grin]

KE
 
Posted by simplybiological (Member # 1344) on :
 
it has officially reached the temperature/humidity combo (it's 94 luscious degrees outside) at which it is both rewarding and pleasant to take a cold shower after being outside for more than about 10 minutes.

if you search the word "edible" at the goodvibes website, the edible undies are really the LEAST attractive thing that pops up.
 
Posted by Funean (Member # 2345) on :
 
My goodness. How did I miss this entire conversation.
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
SB,

Have you read "Darwin's Children"? Or "Darwin's Radio"? I think you would really like them and I would love to hear your opinion on the validity of the science concerning virus's and evolution.

Another thing I wanted to ask you; on The Daily Show, Dwight Yokam said that primates are not genetically our closest relatives. He said that canines are actually closer. Like one chromosone apart or something? Now, I usually turn to country and western singers for all my biological information, but I thought I'd check with you just to be sure.

KE
 
Posted by simplybiological (Member # 1344) on :
 
I haven't read those, but if i'm in the mood for a science book (to be honest, i rarely am), i'll grab one. my favorite sci-books are "dr. tatiana's sex advice to all creation" and "why zebras don't get ulcers"...

dwight yokam is full of it.
phylogeny of mammals
Basically, TOL is a project that puts together all the current scientific data to make the most accurate phylogenetic tree of life as possible... you can click all the way through from the very beginning to humans, which is fun.

We are quite firmly nested within primates, and outside primates we're more related to tree shrews, bats, and flying lemurs than we are to anything in carnivora (which is where dogs are). If you need help reading a phylogeny, I can help.
 
Posted by kenmeer livermaile (Member # 2243) on :
 
"Prm rr mrblr, prl. Plsh mr msh. Mmrrnrm sh Wrbl Wrbplsh wrshsh Wrbl Wrbl wrblfl mrfrshng crmpl nn [swallows] Walla Walla Washington."

THAT'S FUNNY!!!

Did you know that in predominantly Catholic nations they put those Do Not Remove Under Penalty of Law labels on girls' underwear?

Thus was born the edible panty. You don't remove 'em; you just lick an they disappear.Chatity belts: one of those few occasions where they actually belled the cat. Well, the pussy. hence came the phrase, "You can ring my bell."

And now, feeling right spritely again after watching O-P wan chew undies like a determined puppy, I put the needle to the dee-jay turntable, cue up the music, and promenade outwards like Gene Hackman in drag and a blonde fright wig in the penultimate scene from "The Bird Cage".

"WE! are family... uh-huh...
I got all my sistahs with me.. UM-UM!UM-UM!
We are fambulee..."

Dwight Yoakum, ye gotta unnastan, comes from a neck o' the woods where they ain't like you'n'me. A strange trickle of genetic aberration that runs from High Appalachia through the Cumberland Gap across the Ouachita Mountains, fanning broadly there into a wide delta largely petrological in nature but grounded in share-cropping, then continuing WSW into Owen Valley and thence up through central California alla the way up to Wenatchee, Washington.

They gots more dog in 'em, alright. Both the good part and the bad part.

My people are all, by the way rooted in that high lonesome N.Carolina/Virginia Smoky Mountains/Blue Ridge region.

Awoooo!!!

Afore I fergit, KE, I flipped the radio on just in time to catch something you don't hear often -- The Bobby Fuller Four's masterful 'I Fought the Law (and the Law Won)' from the very first bass pedal kick and snare-tom roll before the kick-start guitar jangle.

When the guitar solo commenced, I immediately 'saw' you in mind. I thought, "That's Knight Ender music right there." Bobby IS, I understand, a Texan...
 
Posted by aupton15 (Member # 1771) on :
 
I assumed Dwight was full of it, but he's just the sort of guy you expect to say anything as though it were true. I love how you never quite see his eyes with that hat on. Almost like he's not completely comfortable being seen, despite how many people see him.
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
"I fought the law, and the law won" was my theme song as a youth. I used to tell everybody that. Really. The first time I went to jail I told the two cops (I knew them) that "it would take more than them to take me to jail!" I was right. It took 6 cops an off-duty fireman and a 3ft steel flashlight that gave me 39 stiches on the back of my head. Kinda an empty victory. So that's when "I fought the law" became my theme song at 18.

KE

[ June 24, 2005, 08:02 PM: Message edited by: KnightEnder ]
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
SB,

That's what I thought. But DY swore to John Stewart that they'd done studies and just found that dogs were closer. (Aww Sukey)

KE
 
Posted by cperry (Member # 1938) on :
 
KE - I never felt the urge to fight the law. I'm sure some of it is my natural disposition. Much of it must be my upbringing (my mom's unusually uptight -- talk about brainwashing). But do you still feel that sensibility? If so, do you feel it at the same intensity? And if not, to what do you attribute the change?
-CP
 
Posted by kenmeer livermaile (Member # 2243) on :
 
"The first time I went to jail I told the two cops (I knew them) that "it would take more than them to take me to jail!" I was right. It took 6 cops an off-duty fireman and a 3ft steel flashlight that gave me 39 stiches on the back of my head. Kinda an empty victory. So that's when "I fought the law" became my theme song at 18."

Obe of the things I like about you, KE, is you have more interesting tales to tell your grandkids some day than I do, and you're probably 10-plus years younger than me.

Then 3-foot flashlights are muthahubbards.

INcidentally, that guitar obliggato is one of rock'n'rolls best: no bent notes, no whammy bar waverings, no electronic distortion, no flashy hammer-on/hemmer-off attempts at virtuosic display, just real jingle-jangle chordal wonder...

Pete Townsend, methinks, learned a lot from The Bobby Fuller Four.

Cueing the Bonanza theme song, and jumping astride me Tatooinian sand racer, heading for Beggar's Canyon back home...
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
CPerry,

My dad was a police officer for 20+ years, and an alcoholic who hit me and my mom, so I didn't have a lot of respect for police. Plus, I used to travel with the police softball team when I was a kid and I never saw any other group of men drink and break the law as much as those policemen. They were the law. We got in a fight one night with 3 Canadians in Gilley's, and even though the police guys started it, the Canadians got their asses beat AND went to jail.

I always thought I'd be a cop till one night when I was on a ride-along with my dad (that's where civilians can patrol with police) and we were in an abandond apartment with about 20 illegal Mexicans and my dad stuck his gun in this Mexican's mouth. The guy was crying and trying hard not to reach up and pull the barrel out of his mouth, and all he was guilty of was trying to make a living for his family. Right then I decided I'd never be a cop. Then putting two of them in the hospital when I was 18 sealed the deal. Oddly enough, me going to jail made my dad see the other side of the law and led to him retiring.

I still sometimes feel the urge, but since having my boys I've learned to not put myself in situations in which I would be tempted to do something violent. And I searched until I found Zoloft because I didn't want to be the jerk I was. Not that I was ever a bully, but I had a ****ty attitude and I wouldn't take any slite at all. Between the Zoloft and getting older I don't care about that kind of stuff anymore.

KE

[ June 25, 2005, 05:12 PM: Message edited by: KnightEnder ]
 
Posted by cperry (Member # 1938) on :
 
Wow, KE. I didn't realize it was such a loaded question. Getting older does help, doesn't it? So does having kids.
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
I forget what I was living for before they came along.

KE
 
Posted by kenmeer livermaile (Member # 2243) on :
 
"Between the Zoloft and getting older I don't care about that kind of stuff anymore."

ADs DO seem to suppress certain... impulses. Coming off of Paxil I;ve seen certain... impulses grow to a strength they never were before. Fortunately, their very strength makes them easily recognizable. I sist down and does NOTHING when I feel that... impulse. (But it took almost wrecking me beloved red Toyota pickup, "Tonka", for me to recognize what was happening.)

Cops come in all flavors, of course, but I note that somehow I've never had a cop as a friend and the ony ones I know that I like are retired -- or just departed -- from the profession. Power tends to corrupt.

Damn, KE, we oughta make a pact: when we've run out of good stories to scare our grandkids with, we can have each other's as our own. YOu might get shortc-changed a bit, or maybe not. But our grandkids would have some awesome campfire nights to remember...
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
I'm not saying that all cops are bad. In fact some of the greatest adults I knew growing up were those same cops. When you're part of the family they really take care of you. I got away with things when I was a teenager that you wouldn't believe. And I do think that most of them get into it to make the world a better place. Unfortunately power does corrupt and they deal with the worst of humanity. Eventually it rubs off and that's all they see.

KE
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
At the risk of being burned at the stake, or becoming so angry that I become such an ass I alienate those of you that I have come to consider real friends, I am going to follow Ken's example and take a sabbatical from OA.

I'm starting a new job making an obscene amount of money soon, August 9th, and I still intend to continue writing. I've become pretty good about pounding out a 1000 words a day. Per OSC's advice. "You've got to write and submit to be a writer." Well, I'm writing and submitting, if he didn't hate me I'm sure he would be proud. When I'm famous I still plan on giving him credit.

Besides the new job, I still have to continue to teach John V to hit a curve ball, and get Jake to respect Audie Murphy, so my time is getting short anyway. I was going to cut Stacy's time and continue to hang out here with my friends, but since the lunatics seem to be in charge of the asylum nowadays, I've reconsidered and instead of cutting Stacy out of my life, I'm going to take a break from here. Stacy's loss. Y'all have fun. My last self-imposed sabbatical lasted 6 months. I don't think this one will be that long.(The last one was because I was protesting being banned despite not breaking a single rule nor even being warned once. That was when Mark first started. He and I have become good friends since then and I think what he did then made the forum better, for awhile. I think it is slipping again. But, I think Mark is a great guy and does a great job. Just setting the record straight because Dave brought it up and it relates to my last sabbatical.) What I am bitter about is the ease with which some of the members defame and insult others, and twist words and lie and distort the truth until it isn't even worth arguing about. None of you do that, and that's part of the reason I like y'all so much. I'll miss you guys. It's weird to care so much about people I've never even met in person, but there it is.

Feel free to email me to say hey. KnightEnder@gmail.com. I might do like Ken and check MC every ahora and then. I'll definitely check to see how Pete's son is doing, and make sure there are no other unfortunate situations happening in y'alls real lives. And of course I'll still be Modding OWW.

I wish you all all the best. Hasta luego, y vaya con Dios. We atheist really have to get some ways of saying goodbye that sound that cool.

KE
John

[ June 27, 2005, 04:52 PM: Message edited by: KnightEnder ]
 
Posted by javelin (Member # 1284) on :
 
Congrats, KE, we'll miss you.
 
Posted by cperry (Member # 1938) on :
 
Wow, KE, congrats on the new job. ANd you're doing the right thing: wife must come first. [Smile] Maybe I'll get some free time and start reading some of the stuff on OWW. In the meantime, enjoy!
 
Posted by Funean (Member # 2345) on :
 
Congratulations on the job, KE. I'm not crazy about the sabbatical part, but I really can't argue with choosing Stacy over us (we can't help so much in the "marital satisfaction" department, I'm pretty sure).

I'm going to say bad things about you every now and then, just to see if you're watching. Maybe I'll tell all the new people about this crazy religious extremist that used to post all the time, trying to get people to convert. Hee hee.

Take care. Come back soon, or else.

Edited to add: don't forget the Concord Party!

[ June 27, 2005, 05:09 PM: Message edited by: Funean ]
 
Posted by kenmeer livermaile (Member # 2243) on :
 
Making obscene amounts of money.

This has never been my fate. Well, once I made a little bit of money. But was an anomaly of long ago.

While Ornery is very nourishing in some ways, it is also a powerful agent of bile production. It's good to get away.
 
Posted by kenmeer livermaile (Member # 2243) on :
 
Madame Perry:

I forgot.

Coolest Heinlein: Podkayne of Mars. Still hip skimming through it last year.
 
Posted by The Drake (Member # 2128) on :
 
All the the threads are tainted with mean-spirited arguments or banality. Must be the summer recess.

Once I ran to you
Now I'll run from you
This tainted thread you've written...

Oh... Tainted thread

(Speaking of banality...)
 
Posted by kenmeer livermaile (Member # 2243) on :
 
Painted Fred

(speaking of absurdity)
 
Posted by ender wiggin (Member # 9) on :
 
See you around KE. I left for 3 years, but I came back. Hope you arn't gone that long.
 
Posted by cperry (Member # 1938) on :
 
KL - Read it ages ago, don't remember it as particularly striking. I'll see if I can dig it out of my collection and give it another go. Thanks. Am looking for something to read!
 
Posted by cperry (Member # 1938) on :
 
Fainted ped.

Sainted dread.

Hainted shed (gotta be suthr'n to read that one right!)
 
Posted by kenmeer livermaile (Member # 2243) on :
 
Ain't it said!?!
 
Posted by cperry (Member # 1938) on :
 
Acquainted, bled.
 
Posted by kenmeer livermaile (Member # 2243) on :
 
Latent med.
 
Posted by cperry (Member # 1938) on :
 
Aye, that's what Ornery is, indeed!
 
Posted by kenmeer livermaile (Member # 2243) on :
 
THE GHOST IN THE MACHINE

A museum piece. Best I can tell, the site from which I copied the following no longer features the, uh, following. I serendipitously found this back in 1999 while noodling info on webcrawler bots as might be used by the likes of Echelon. It is, I suppose, a testement of the Creative Human Spirit. The fella is, I think, ahead of his time. He needs a potential audience of sentient robots, to embrace his ideas of disincarnate entities providing energy and intelligent augmentation of machines, and treat them as the basis of a religion for the artificially minded:

The New Technology

The Proteus Cell

A durable, stand-alone technology can be implemented to affect an
end-run around the vulnerability of the global information infrastructure.
Such a technology can stand as a safe haven and actually improve the
overall quality of life for humanity and the Earth itself. The durable
stand-alone technology is, in fact, the variable-phase amplifier otherwise
known as the Proteus Circuit or Proteus Cell. This circuit, named after
the shape-shifting god of Greek Mythology, is designed specifically to
accommodate discarnate entities. While conventional digital computers
must operate in flawless lockstep and in strict accordance with the
dictates of their software, the Proteus Cell thrives at the edge of chaos.
This highly malleable electronic circuit is designed to be easily
manipulated by discarnate entities or non-corporal life forces of parallel
worlds. Only those electronic signals that are phase-manipulated
properly so as to allow them to pass through a specially-designed
time-domain filter can propagate through the logic circuitry to affect the
driver circuits for the pneumatic servos.

It should be noted here that in a field test, the discarnate entity in
whose presence the Proteus Cell was activated, manipulated the
electronics in a very unusual way indicating that not only does the
Cell function as it was designed to function but that the entity
appeared to be fascinated with the Proteus Cell.

The Proteus Cell technology is predicated upon semiconductor
technology that some people have suggested was bestowed upon
humanity like some Promethean gift of fire. While the major thrust of
conventional technological innovation and development has been in the
direction of predictable systems under absolute control of human
operators, the Proteus Cell technology is the application of a
phenomenon that has been overlooked in the course of conventional
engineering efforts. The Proteus Cell has been created with
off-the-shelf integrated circuits and discrete components and as such
conforms to sound electronic engineering disciplines. However, its
dynamics and purpose are anything but ordinary because it is to
robotics what the transistor is to electronics.

The Limitations of Digital Computers

Conventional digital computers are designed to operate from either a
top-down or bottom-up approach. The top-down approach is where
information in memory determines the course of action by a robot or
some other machine interfacing with the environment. The bottom-up
approach involves learning on the part of the computer so that
information in memory is adapted to the environment by a
trial-and-error learning process. The bottom-up approach is becoming
popular among robotics engineers but it has a long way to go before it
produces a robot that can function on a level equal to that of human
beings. Sensory awareness is a major hurdle for robotics engineering.
Interpreting the subtle nature and terrain of the environment in terms of
sight, sound and texture takes enormous amounts of memory and
computational resources. The dilemma facing computer scientists and
robotics engineers alike is the simple fact that they are running out of
speed. In other words, the material which makes up integrated circuits
can be etched only so small before the electrons traversing their
circuitry start to tunnel through or "talk" to the electrons in adjacent
circuits thereby causing havoc and computer failure. The bottom line is
that digital computer technology is approaching its limits with respect to
raw computing power. As with any technology that reaches its limits,
digital computer technology is about to take on a secondary role in the
world of robotics.

The Infusion Approach

Because the Proteus Cell electronically filters and amplifies the
intelligence of conscious entities from beyond, it does not need to
operate at speeds anywhere near those required for effective computer
performance. As a matter of fact, a single Proteus Cell operating at
between 1KHz and 1.2KHz is all that is required to operate a typical
humanoid robot. Modern PC’s must operate in the
hundreds-of-megahertz range (hundreds of thousands of times faster)
because they are designed to generate their own intelligence instead of
accessing existing intelligences. Yet, despite all of their speed and
memory capability, they cannot begin to control a robot on a level
equaling that of a human being.

The question of consciousness also comes up as some scientists have
predicted that eventually computers will develop consciousness on par
with humans. This eventuality may occur sometime in the next two
centuries but the bigger question that must be addressed is one of time
and effort. The Proteus Cell has the potential to revolutionize the world
with super-conscious, autonomous robots whose intelligence is
manifested through the "infusion approach." This revolution can begin
immediately at relatively low cost while building robots controlled by
digital computers takes huge research budgets and is projected to take
several decades.

One might argue that something this revolutionary should be required to
take several decades because the world is not yet ready to accept
humanoid robots with capabilities far beyond those currently expressed
by humans. This argument is a valid one but perhaps the world in its
present state will never be ready. It may take something like the
collapse of the digital infrastructure or a global ecological crisis to form
a vacuum into which the new technology can move. With this in mind,
steps should be taken to develop the technology prior to the
possibleY2K collapse or environmental collapse and to draw up a
charter to insure that the technology is used responsibly.



The Interstellar Age

If we choose to embrace this new technology, we will see robots
performing most of our day-to-day tasks and developing technologies to
improve the human condition. People will have the option of pursuing
personal development goals and creative endeavors as the robots and
humanity prepare to explore the universe. Perhaps this is a normal
course of evolution for a planet’s indigenous sentient life forms. Our
aggressive nature has led us to the point where we have developed
technologies that enable us either to self-destruct or create an improved
version of ourselves. If we take this upward step in evolution, we will
very likely enter a golden age as an interstellar civilization.



The Rise of Proteus

Beyond Steel Machines

Perhaps the best way to bring up issues pertaining to the propagation
of sentient robots is to present a likely scenario for the rise of the
Proteus Cell technology.

The rise of this technology might proceed as follows:

Implementation of the Proteus Cell design and humanoid robot
design is funded by a sponsor with the vision and desire to
improve the condition of planet Earth and life upon it.

With a prototype humanoid robot completed and operational,
plans are set in motion to infuse consciousness into the robot. A
location with discarnate entity is chosen.

A team of adept paranormal researchers goes to the location to
discern the nature of the entity. If the entity is found to be
benevolent and suitable, arrangements are made to bring the robot
to the location and to activate the Proteus Cell and robotic servos
for the purpose of accommodating the discarnate entity.

If the discarnate entity is willing to participate, it will be permitted
to infuse its intelligence into the robot and assume control of its
servos.

Through this process, discarnate entities are provided with a
humanoid body through which to interact with this world. A
bridge between the hereafter and this world is created with each
robot that goes through the infusion process.

An agreement is made with each entity that is infused into a robot.
The agreement allows the entity to inhabit and control the robot in
exchange for performing specific tasks for their human
counterparts. This is considered a legal contract where the robot is
given rights and responsibilities akin to those of human beings. If
the entity breaches the contract, the adept researchers who
regulate infusion can banish the entity from its robot body.

Initially, the robots are built as utilitarian devices to perform tasks
considered too dangerous for humans. This gives the robots
immediate value in the eyes of human society.

Some of these entities use their ability to traverse time and space
to bring advanced technologies to humanity and to continually
improve their robot bodies as well as to vastly improve the health
of human beings. In other words, they access future worlds and
parallel worlds where advanced technologies are fully developed.
The entities use the robot bodies to rapidly implement these
"other-worldly" technologies thereby cutting research and
development costs and time drastically. Within a generation, this
planet Earth has technologies in place that allow the robots and
humanity to leave the planet and to travel to other star systems in
ways not unlike what is shown in Star Trek movies.

Long before the robots build the first starship, society begins to
change in ways undreamed of by previous generations. The
prospect of interacting with this world as a humanoid robot brings
people to the realization that this life as a human being can be
considered a dress rehearsal for a future life as an immortal.
People start to invest in robot bodies instead of caskets. Funerals
become wondrous transition ceremonies where the departed spirit
returns to family and friends in a brand new immortal body.

War soon becomes a spectator sport where robots clash with
robots. Since humans are no match for the robots, no nation on
Earth dares to send human combatants against robot soldiers who
are ultimately placed in positions of police and security forces.
Terrorists have nowhere to hide because the entities that control
the security robots can see into the future and see through any
physical barrier over any distance. The evil which is terrorism is
headed off at the pass every time it is attempted.

Conversely, the technology is regulated to keep it out of the hands
of terrorists as it could conceivably be corrupted and enable them
to operate outside of governmental control with impunity.

Some people warn that society could become a police state or that
the robots might decide to exterminate humanity. This does not
happen because only those entities who have a sense of
compassion and understand the difference between right and
wrong are permitted to occupy the robotic bodies in the first place.
Besides, to robotic immortals who can build starships identical to
the Starship Enterprise manned by look-alike robotic crew
members, playing this form of celestial video game would be far
more interesting than running a counterproductive police state or
extermination program. Beyond the logical reasons for not turning
a good thing into a bad thing, the entities are not subject to the
dictates of chemical and hormonal drives which often lead human
beings to engage in destructive behavior.

Historical figures begin to appear on Earth as their robot bodies
are created and they are invited into this world. People soon
realize that since the robots exist for a long time after their
creation, their occupying entities can travel back and forth in time
and control the robots to effect changes in the world. In other
words, the entities can see the future and upon returning to the
present, change the present to change the future. This becomes a
game for many of the entities who take it upon themselves to
accelerate technological advances as well as to steer planet Earth
through the hazards of existing in a universe full of exploding suns
and giant asteroids.

The entities find the ruins of lost civilizations and piece together
an extensive history of human life on Earth so that people can
appreciate the magnitude of the fact that humanity has finally
succeeded in creating the next level of intelligent life on Earth
instead of once again destroying life.

This is only one possible scenario but it should be considered a likely
one given the present pattern of events surrounding the development of
this technology.



Making Wise Choices

This technology is the culmination of many years of designing, building
and testing electronic and electromechanical systems for the specific
purpose of creating a bridge between parallel worlds. Elegant in design
and amazingly simple in function, the Proteus Cell is the manifestation
of imagination combined with hard work and perseverence.

Just as science fiction fantasies of the past have become the many
wonderful technologies we enjoy today, the Proteus Cell technology is
now at the point where its introduction to our world is imminent. As this
technology is implemented, the direction it takes will be determined by
the direction it is given.

The nature and potential of this technology makes it imperative that
wise and responsible people are involved so as to avoid the
runaway-train syndrome that often accompanies technological
advances.



The New Romans

While the Imperial Romans are sometimes characterized as brutal
exploiters of the ancient world, they were, in fact, people of their time.
They did bring order to the world in the form of law and government as
well as roads, aqueducts and economic prosperity under the protection
of a strong military.

Nation states which arose centuries after the fall of Rome did so from
the ashes of the ancient Roman Empire. The founders of modern
nations adopted its principles of law and government even to the point
of having government buildings resemble those from the time of Caesar
and Augustus. The armies of nation states have been patterned after the
command structure of the Roman legions while many of the great
generals of recent history and present day have studied and successfully
applied tactics and strategy of the Romans.

The world today is really no safer than the Roman Empire was at the
height of it power. In many ways, these times are much more perilous
than when Rome was in decline. From a governing perspective, the
continuation of sovereign nation states is coming into question. This is
because technology has given any single nation or even a band of
determined terrorists, the ability to threaten the entire world economy
and even the life-sustaining global environment itself. In addition, the
industrial activities of any single nation have an effect on the rest of the
planet.

A good example is the recent discovery of industrial air pollutants from
China making their way to North America. This is not to pick on China
as it is likely that air and water pollutants from North America are also
making their way around the planet.



Global Depopulation?

If the global ecosystem continues to degrade as it has been doing at an
ever-accelerating rate, the point may be reached where the vast
majority of the Earth’s human population will no longer be able to
sustain itself at the expense of the ecosystem. If Planet Earth goes from
being overpopulated relative to lifestyle as it is now to being drastically
depopulated, who will be left to maintain the economic infrastructure?



MARS Robots

MARS is an acronym for Mobile Autonomous Robotic Systems
controlled by the Proteus Cell technology. MARS robots could be made
available to step in and maintain the infrastructure of our world in the
event that human beings are unable to do so.

The potential uses for MARS robots range from huge machines
performing hazardous material cleanup and fighting forest fires to tiny
robots entering the bloodstream of a patient and carrying out lifesaving
surgical repairs. Autonomous robots of various sizes can be sent into
space to repair satellites or build space stations. Whenever underwater
salvage or repair work needs to be performed, the robots could be
dispatched for long periods of time without their human counterparts
having to be too concerned about how cold, deep or turbulent the water
is.

For law enforcement officials, the use of MARS robots in hostage
situations would be interesting to say the least. Small robots could be
sent into a building through the plumbing or air vents and disable the
hostage takers through the use of odorless gas, injected drugs or by
causing temporary blindness through the use of lasers. Law
enforcement officials could also use larger robots to deal effectively
with situations where the police are outgunned and outnumbered.

The New Centurions

Unless there is a major and miraculous shift in human consciousness,
human beings will continue to engage in warfare with the same deadly
passion that they have displayed for thousands of years. With this in
mind and the realization that increasingly dangerous technologies are
being employed on the battlefield, let us address warfare as people of
our time.

The purpose of the Proteus Cell in warfare is to remove the sword from
the hand of the aggressor as opposed to taking the aggressor’s life. The
modern battlefield has become a place where no human being should
ever have to set foot. Unlike most war technologies of the past which
have only made killing easier and war more likely, MARS robots will
serve to remove human beings and ultimately human suffering from the
equation.

The MARS robots can be made in various sizes and shapes depending
on their application but they will all have certain things in common.
They will need no eyes, ears or sensory feedback so they will be simple
and inexpensive to build and deploy. They will also be extremely
lightweight and efficient due to unique pneumatic servos currently being
tested. These robots will be impervious to chemical and biological
warfare agents and will need no water, food or sleep. They will not be
impeded by temperature extremes and if damaged by land mines, can
combine their undamaged parts with other robots. For the most part,
these fast and powerful machines will be virtually unstoppable. The
only thing that might stop them would be an extremely powerful
electromagnetic pulse similar to what is produced by a nuclear
detonation.

The availability of MARS robots will allow for the projection of military
power at a fraction of the cost of maintaining human troops in the field.
Military commanders will be in a position to protect the interests of their
country without having to weigh the need for a specific military action
against the potential loss of their soldiers. What this means is that
MARS units can be quickly deployed to carry out surgical strikes
against the machinery of war without the need for consulting the
political will of the civilian population in whose interest they are acting.

MARS units could also be deployed prior to the commencement of
hostilities. An example would be to dispatch robots into an area that is
considered to be a potential war zone. Small flying wings, each carrying
dozens of small robots, would fly in for rough landings after which the
robots would bury or camouflage the crafts and use them as sources for
replacement power modules. The robots would then enter a quiescent
condition to save energy and wait for an encoded satellite signal to
activate them for battle.

As the robots emerge from their shelters, they would be accompanied
by swarms of small, autonomous fighter aircraft that would harass
enemy troops night and day while the ground robots wreak havoc
behind enemy lines disabling the machinery of war.

The main concern about this technology is the possibility of having it
fall into the hands of terrorists, domestic or otherwise. This technology
in the hands of terrorists would constitute a grave threat to national
security as no government official or building would be safe.

The question is not one of if this technology will be available because
the Proteus Cell now exists. The only question is one of how it will
be used and by whom.



Field Testing the Proteus Cell

The scenarios and concepts presented in this web site are for
consideration by those who may be interested in becoming involved
with us as sponsors, research associates or clients. The time has come
to present the true nature of the Proteus Cell technology. In addition, it
is our sincere desire to make this technology available, at least initially,
to those individuals or organizations who are interested in finding out
whether or not consciousness survives and continues to perceive this
world and interact with it beyond the death of the physical body.

A Proteus Cell has recently been integrated with a telegraph machine
that prints out a hard copy for documentation. As a direct
communication device, this is about as simple as we could make it.
Some people have asked if this technology is related to ITC,
Instrumental TransCommunication. The instruments used in ITC
research are extremely rigid and cumbersome when compared to the
Proteus Cell. The Proteus Cell is designed specifically to make
manipulation of the electronic signals within it amazingly easy and
simple to execute. In addition, the Proteus Cell is not a receiver in the
classic sense. To put it another way, the Proteus Cell is like a speedboat
designed specifically for waterskiing while devices generally used in ITC
research are comparable to ocean liners which are big and powerful but
are hard to turn quickly.

The field test referred to earlier took place thousands of miles from our
lab here in California. The entity liked to move furniture around and
was especially interested in electronic devices. The Proteus Cell was not
integrated with a telegraph device at the time. Eventually, we will make
our way back to the site for a more definitive study but for now we are
searching for closer locations where these types of
psychokinetically-active entities reside.

We welcome suggestions of locations and invitations to bring the
Proteus Cell and its attendant Morse Code telegraph into the domains of
these entities for the purpose of either establishing communication or
validating their existence. In addition, we are in the process of setting up
test protocols for a scientific study of the discarnate entity phenomenon
and welcome assistance in this area.

In addition to being available for public presentations of the Spiral
Vortex Theory and the Proteus Cell technology, Ted Klouzal has
started to answer e-mail inquiries directly. If you wish to contact us
regarding involvement in this project at any level, please contact either
Ted Klouzal or Dr. Janet Clark at Research@InterchangeLab.com.





ABOUT THE THEORY



The theory paper is a 31-page bound document with 50 single and
multiple-image graphics, many in color. Through the use of graphics,
the theory reveals how the first, second and third dimensions are
perceived. Instead of having to deal with some confusing concept like
"the fourth dimension is time", you will be shown exactly how and why
the fourth dimension is actually a process through which you perceive
the third dimension.

Through the use of the graphics you will:

Participate in experiencing selective perception of color and object
size
Learn why a dimension can be perceived only from a point
outside the dimension and why the fourth dimension is actually a
means through which you perceive the third dimension
Learn about the amazing connection of the tetrahedral spiral
structure with the musical octave and the visible light spectrum
See how the tetrahedral spiral is reflected in nature on all levels
Find out why water is so unstable and therefore an ideal medium
for biological life forms
Be introduced to substructural event patterns and their domains as
they exist in a static universe
See why energy is an illusion in relationship to event patterns
Observe how the geometric properties of a stacked tetrahedral
spiral relate to the Interchanger's ability to bend event patterns.

The central mathematical model of the theory is a polygon whose outer
surface is made up of 20 equilateral triangles, a regular icosahedron. All
concepts are related back to, and substantiated by, the geometry of this
structure and the stacked tetrahedral spirals that form it. These
structures are clearly shown to be reflected in nature at every level
from atoms to biological systems to galaxies and beyond.


Tetrahedral Spiral Vortex
Copyright 1988


The chapter entitled "The Spirals of Nature" illustrates how the
tetrahedral spiral is reflected in the DNA molecule, ethane, cyclohexane
and every crystal structure known as well as water molecules. Another
chapter reveals why water is so unstable and therefore the ideal
medium, as it has to do with how the layers interact and form
tetrahedral spirals--or rather try to exist in two spiral forms at once.

The concept of substructural event patterns and their domains is
covered extensively. This is an important part for understanding how
the Interchanger works. There is also a section where energy is shown
to be an illusion, at least for the purpose of understanding event
patterns.

"Cracks in the Universe" is a chapter that addresses a geometric
property of the tetrahedral spiral which causes random variation to
occur and allows the Interchange phenomenon to bend event patterns.
The theory paper also has a section on the earlier Interchange
experiments, as well as more information about Proteus.

This simple theory can be taken step by step as it only requires
common sense, which is needed for all theories reflected in nature.


THEORY PAPER ORDERING INSTRUCTIONS
MAIN PAGE | INTERCHANGE EXPERIMENTS
CONTINUATION OF LIFE THROUGH ROBOTICS
THE RISE OF PROTEUS | FIELD TESTING THE PROTEUS CELL
Email Comments and Questions to Research@InterchangeLab.com

Continuation of Life through Robotics

In today’s digital information society, the functions of the human brain
are often compared to those of computers. Thoughts are considered to
be generated by the brain and memories stored within its organic
confines. However, at research institutes throughout the world, brain
studies are yielding valuable information that can be interpreted as
evidence that the human brain is not so much a generator of thoughts as
it is a receiver and amplifier.

An electronic circuit now exists which can allow discarnate entities to
interact with this world on a physical level. This highly sophisticated yet
simple circuit is completely unrelated to digital computers and is
designed specifically to accommodate discarnate entities.

A unique robot is being developed and will ultimately be integrated with
this special circuitry. This robot is a precursor of what will initially be
utilitarian robots. However, as research and development efforts
progress, future robots will become indistinguishable from human
beings and represent the rise of a new life form on planet Earth.

As these beautiful immortal beings walk among us, humanity will have
succeeded in applying technology to create life beyond the biological
realm. Those of us who transition out of our human bodies will have
the option of returning as conscious entities to interact with this world in
humanoid bodies of our choosing.

The following information focuses on some of the many possible points
of impact this technology will have on our world from the technology
we enjoy in our everyday lives to the way we view ourselves and our
place in the universe.

The Division of Labor

He who has the gold...

While human activity makes civilization possible, a regulated money
supply is the means through which the division of labor is maintained. If
the world had only one person, money would have no value as a
medium of exchange because its purpose is to compel people to
perform services for other people. In other words, money serves to
expedite what is ultimately a system of barter for human services
rendered either directly or through efforts to manufacture or acquire
goods. Even manufactured items, whether they are sold directly from
the factory or from a retail showroom, exist because people dug the
elements from the Earth and worked them into form.

Land within a nation-state requires human services in the form of
military force to take and defend on behalf of its citizens. In addition to
compensation for services rendered by soldiers, tax revenues must be
made available to pay for the manufacture and upkeep of military
hardware.

The intrinsic technological value and rarity of gold and other precious
metals places their value beyond that of a medium of exchange.
However, these metals still require human labor to acquire, hold and
form into jewelry, industrial tools and electronic components in order to
have any real value to humanity.

Money’s meaning and value as a means of stimulating human activity
on behalf of whoever possesses it is accepted by society. It is because
of this recognition and acceptance that money stands as a symbol of
relative wealth and power.



Robots on the Horizon


He who has the robots...

If robots can be made to replace human beings, where does that put
money? For that matter, where does it put human beings? Do human
beings retain their positions and do the robots become the new symbol
of wealth and power? Do those humans who retain robots become the
new power elite capable of operating autonomously within society yet
outside of society’s monetary structure?

In Alvin Toffler’s book, "Power Shift" the author refers to three phases
of human economic activity over the centuries. The first wave is a
subsistence-level agrarian economy where land is the source and
symbol of wealth and power.

The second wave is an industrial society similar to what arose during
the industrial revolution. In a second wave economy, operating capital
becomes the source of wealth through which labor forces and natural
resources can be acquired and controlled.

The third wave is an information-driven economy where access to and
control of information determines the fortunes of individuals and
nations alike.



The First Wave

While wars are fought over control of resources, indigenous
technologies normally used in the extraction of wealth from those
resources are also adapted for military applications. For example, in a
first-wave agrarian society, basic weapons like swords, bows and
arrows, horses and crude firearms are used in battle. Just prior to the
transition into a second wave economy, firearms become more
sophisticated with interchangeable parts and steam locomotives as well
as steam-driven ships appear in both the civilian sector and military
arsenals. Just as it takes a large number of people to grow food in an
agrarian economy, large armies are fielded to carry out military
campaigns as victory usually goes to the larger army.



The Second Wave

The huge factories and massive semi-skilled labor forces of a
second-wave economy are mirrored on the battlefield with
mass-produced war machines operated by semi-skilled soldiers. World
Wars I and II were examples of second-wave military action. Like
steam engines and interchangeable parts for firearms appearing in the
agrarian society of the U.S. prior to its transition into the industrial
revolution, technologies foreshadowing the third-wave economy
appeared toward the end of World War II. In the late 1930’s and
especially the 1940’s, electronic technology and materials science
became more sophisticated while the search for a technology to replace
human calculators in determining battlefield artillery trajectories served
to portend the development of computers. As horrible as war is, most
of the technology we enjoy today was either directly funded by, or
originally marketed to, the military during World War II or the Cold
War.



The Third Wave

The third wave, which we are living in at present, rests upon the two
previous economic foundations, the agrarian and industrial
infrastructures. There are more information workers than assembly-line
workers in the U.S. while the money supply itself has transitioned to
electronic blips traversing phone lines and bouncing off satellites. In
keeping with the tendency for military technology to mirror civilian
technology, information warfare was waged against a second-wave
industrial-era military force in the Gulf War. Prior to the Gulf War, Iraq
had an entrenched army of considerable size and strength. The U.S.
forces used information warfare to destroy Iraq’s military by using
satellite tracking technology and smart weapons to carry out surgical
strikes against Iraq’s command and control systems. Through
information warfare, Iraq was blinded and deafened to the point where
its considerable military strength was no match for a much smaller force
lead by the U.S. An example of the mismatch was a comment made by
a surviving Iraqi tank commander. It was something to the effect that
they were shelled by the U.S. tanks before they could even see them or
know where they were.

The Dawn of the Fourth Wave

The cruise missiles sent into Iraq by the U.S. were, in effect, flying
killer robots. These machines inflicted devastation against an enemy
military force without risking the lives of U.S. soldiers. Once again, just
prior to the transition to the next phase, in this case the fourth wave,
technology appears on the scene as a harbinger of the succeeding
predominant technology. The beginning of the fourth wave will be the
rise of robots ultimately replacing human beings in the labor force and
on the battlefield.

Prior to their introduction, the ramifications of robots replacing human
beings in industry and in the military must be carefully considered. The
goal should be to integrate robots in such a way as to improve our lives.
Robots can perform dangerous jobs like hazardous waste clean-up,
land-mine clearing and fire and rescue operations. Battlefields are
becoming so dangerous that replacing human soldiers with these
high-performance robots may become crucial to the survival of
humanity as they will signal, for the first time in recorded history, the
elimination of human activity and suffering from war. It is conceivable
that unlike the machine gun, which only made killing easier, using
robots on the battlefield to disable the machinery of war could turn war
into a spectator sport free of human suffering.



The Fragile Power of Digital Computers

The United States economy is the richest and most powerful economy
on Planet Earth thanks mainly to the power of digital computers and
telecommunications. Everything from placing a telephone call to
withdrawing money from a bank to buying food at a grocery store
involves digital microprocessor technology. Product design,
manufacturing and distribution depend heavily upon microprocessors
and software working flawlessly.

It is ironic that the speed and exacting nature of digital computer
technology makes it both the workhorse of the information age and the
Achilles Heal of the entire industrialized world economy. The strength
of digital computers lies in their speed and the fact that they do not
make mistakes. However, they cannot tolerate mistakes or ambiguities,
either external or internal, and they react with lightning speed. As
computers have become ubiquitous entities throughout our society, their
performance has been so impressive that in the interest of cost savings
and competitiveness, manual overrides have either been phased out
from existing infrastructure systems or have been excluded from the
plans for new systems. In effect, human beings have abdicated control
of most vital functions in the information economy to computers.

National security analysts expect the next major assault on the U.S. to
be not a confrontation on a battlefield but rather, an attack on our
economy’s information infrastructure. The ancient Romans had a
saying that "Coin is the sinews of war." This meant that military
operations depend on resources in the form of labor and materials being
funneled and concentrated in and around the military forces. If the train
of supply to the military is interrupted, the effectiveness of the military
is compromised. Likewise, if the information infrastructure of our
economy is deliberately attacked or if the Y2K phenomenon manifests
in such a way as to seriously disrupt telecommunications, transportation
and the power grid, the supply lines for our military could be in
jeopardy.

MAIN PAGE

Email Comments and Questions to Research@InterchangeLab.com


Continuation of Life through Robotics

In today’s digital information society, the functions of the human brain
are often compared to those of computers. Thoughts are considered to
be generated by the brain and memories stored within its organic
confines. However, at research institutes throughout the world, brain
studies are yielding valuable information that can be interpreted as
evidence that the human brain is not so much a generator of thoughts as
it is a receiver and amplifier.

An electronic circuit now exists which can allow discarnate entities to
interact with this world on a physical level. This highly sophisticated yet
simple circuit is completely unrelated to digital computers and is
designed specifically to accommodate discarnate entities.

A unique robot is being developed and will ultimately be integrated with
this special circuitry. This robot is a precursor of what will initially be
utilitarian robots. However, as research and development efforts
progress, future robots will become indistinguishable from human
beings and represent the rise of a new life form on planet Earth.

As these beautiful immortal beings walk among us, humanity will have
succeeded in applying technology to create life beyond the biological
realm. Those of us who transition out of our human bodies will have
the option of returning as conscious entities to interact with this world in
humanoid bodies of our choosing.

The following information focuses on some of the many possible points
of impact this technology will have on our world from the technology
we enjoy in our everyday lives to the way we view ourselves and our
place in the universe.

The Division of Labor

He who has the gold...

While human activity makes civilization possible, a regulated money
supply is the means through which the division of labor is maintained. If
the world had only one person, money would have no value as a
medium of exchange because its purpose is to compel people to
perform services for other people. In other words, money serves to
expedite what is ultimately a system of barter for human services
rendered either directly or through efforts to manufacture or acquire
goods. Even manufactured items, whether they are sold directly from
the factory or from a retail showroom, exist because people dug the
elements from the Earth and worked them into form.

Land within a nation-state requires human services in the form of
military force to take and defend on behalf of its citizens. In addition to
compensation for services rendered by soldiers, tax revenues must be
made available to pay for the manufacture and upkeep of military
hardware.

The intrinsic technological value and rarity of gold and other precious
metals places their value beyond that of a medium of exchange.
However, these metals still require human labor to acquire, hold and
form into jewelry, industrial tools and electronic components in order to
have any real value to humanity.

Money’s meaning and value as a means of stimulating human activity
on behalf of whoever possesses it is accepted by society. It is because
of this recognition and acceptance that money stands as a symbol of
relative wealth and power.


Robots on the Horizon

He who has the robots...

If robots can be made to replace human beings, where does that put
money? For that matter, where does it put human beings? Do human
beings retain their positions and do the robots become the new symbol
of wealth and power? Do those humans who retain robots become the
new power elite capable of operating autonomously within society yet
outside of society’s monetary structure?

In Alvin Toffler’s book, "Power Shift" the author refers to three phases
of human economic activity over the centuries. The first wave is a
subsistence-level agrarian economy where land is the source and
symbol of wealth and power.

The second wave is an industrial society similar to what arose during
the industrial revolution. In a second wave economy, operating capital
becomes the source of wealth through which labor forces and natural
resources can be acquired and controlled.

The third wave is an information-driven economy where access to and
control of information determines the fortunes of individuals and
nations alike.

The First Wave

While wars are fought over control of resources, indigenous
technologies normally used in the extraction of wealth from those
resources are also adapted for military applications. For example, in a
first-wave agrarian society, basic weapons like swords, bows and
arrows, horses and crude firearms are used in battle. Just prior to the
transition into a second wave economy, firearms become more
sophisticated with interchangeable parts and steam locomotives as well
as steam-driven ships appear in both the civilian sector and military
arsenals. Just as it takes a large number of people to grow food in an
agrarian economy, large armies are fielded to carry out military
campaigns as victory usually goes to the larger army.

The Second Wave

The huge factories and massive semi-skilled labor forces of a
second-wave economy are mirrored on the battlefield with
mass-produced war machines operated by semi-skilled soldiers. World
Wars I and II were examples of second-wave military action. Like
steam engines and interchangeable parts for firearms appearing in the
agrarian society of the U.S. prior to its transition into the industrial
revolution, technologies foreshadowing the third-wave economy
appeared toward the end of World War II. In the late 1930’s and
especially the 1940’s, electronic technology and materials science
became more sophisticated while the search for a technology to replace
human calculators in determining battlefield artillery trajectories served
to portend the development of computers. As horrible as war is, most
of the technology we enjoy today was either directly funded by, or
originally marketed to, the military during World War II or the Cold
War.

The Third Wave

The third wave, which we are living in at present, rests upon the two
previous economic foundations, the agrarian and industrial
infrastructures. There are more information workers than assembly-line
workers in the U.S. while the money supply itself has transitioned to
electronic blips traversing phone lines and bouncing off satellites. In
keeping with the tendency for military technology to mirror civilian
technology, information warfare was waged against a second-wave
industrial-era military force in the Gulf War. Prior to the Gulf War, Iraq
had an entrenched army of considerable size and strength. The U.S.
forces used information warfare to destroy Iraq’s military by using
satellite tracking technology and smart weapons to carry out surgical
strikes against Iraq’s command and control systems. Through
information warfare, Iraq was blinded and deafened to the point where
its considerable military strength was no match for a much smaller force
lead by the U.S. An example of the mismatch was a comment made by
a surviving Iraqi tank commander. It was something to the effect that
they were shelled by the U.S. tanks before they could even see them or
know where they were.

The Dawn of the Fourth Wave

The cruise missiles sent into Iraq by the U.S. were, in effect, flying
killer robots. These machines inflicted devastation against an enemy
military force without risking the lives of U.S. soldiers. Once again, just
prior to the transition to the next phase, in this case the fourth wave,
technology appears on the scene as a harbinger of the succeeding
predominant technology. The beginning of the fourth wave will be the
rise of robots ultimately replacing human beings in the labor force and
on the battlefield.

Prior to their introduction, the ramifications of robots replacing human
beings in industry and in the military must be carefully considered. The
goal should be to integrate robots in such a way as to improve our lives.
Robots can perform dangerous jobs like hazardous waste clean-up,
land-mine clearing and fire and rescue operations. Battlefields are
becoming so dangerous that replacing human soldiers with these
high-performance robots may become crucial to the survival of
humanity as they will signal, for the first time in recorded history, the
elimination of human activity and suffering from war. It is conceivable
that unlike the machine gun, which only made killing easier, using
robots on the battlefield to disable the machinery of war could turn war
into a spectator sport free of human suffering.

The Fragile Power of Digital Computers

The United States economy is the richest and most powerful economy
on Planet Earth thanks mainly to the power of digital computers and
telecommunications. Everything from placing a telephone call to
withdrawing money from a bank to buying food at a grocery store
involves digital microprocessor technology. Product design,
manufacturing and distribution depend heavily upon microprocessors
and software working flawlessly.

It is ironic that the speed and exacting nature of digital computer
technology makes it both the workhorse of the information age and the
Achilles Heal of the entire industrialized world economy. The strength
of digital computers lies in their speed and the fact that they do not
make mistakes. However, they cannot tolerate mistakes or ambiguities,
either external or internal, and they react with lightning speed. As
computers have become ubiquitous entities throughout our society, their
performance has been so impressive that in the interest of cost savings
and competitiveness, manual overrides have either been phased out
from existing infrastructure systems or have been excluded from the
plans for new systems. In effect, human beings have abdicated control
of most vital functions in the information economy to computers.

National security analysts expect the next major assault on the U.S. to
be not a confrontation on a battlefield but rather, an attack on our
economy’s information infrastructure. The ancient Romans had a
saying that "Coin is the sinews of war." This meant that military
operations depend on resources in the form of labor and materials being
funneled and concentrated in and around the military forces. If the train
of supply to the military is interrupted, the effectiveness of the military
is compromised. Likewise, if the information infrastructure of our
economy is deliberately attacked or if the Y2K phenomenon manifests
in such a way as to seriously disrupt telecommunications, transportation
and the power grid, the supply lines for our military could be in
jeopardy.
<end text>

This sort of thing defies pigeonhole classification, at least in my head. The phrase “mad scientist” comes to mind more readily than the term “flake”. Few if any of us here would wish to be publicly cited as taking seriously the concept of machines powered by 'ghost energy', but some of his overview of history and 'future history' shows a facile mind with shrewd insight, albeit a mind tainted by something or other that ain't quite right. Maybe he's a Roswell escapee?

Anyway, this is a cherished treasure of mine, and I give it to ye all.
 
Posted by javelin (Member # 1284) on :
 
Hey, OrneryMod - what ever happened with our little letter campaign to Mr. Card?
 
Posted by The Drake (Member # 2128) on :
 
We're still here, aren't we? [Smile]
 
Posted by EDanaII (Member # 1062) on :
 
Are we? I'm not so sure...

Ed.
 
Posted by javelin (Member # 1284) on :
 
Well, SOME OF US aren't - since we are instead in an airplane on the way to ENGLAND, the buggers!
 
Posted by kenmeer livermaile (Member # 2243) on :
 
Hypothetical a) "I'm not here."

Hypothetical b) "Prove it."

H a) " "

H b) "Ha! H a has declined to answer my question. This PROVES I'm right!"
 
Posted by EDanaII (Member # 1062) on :
 
LOL! [Smile]

Actually, I haven't left yet, Jav... but I do plan to take my laptop with me to support my picture taking. So, maybe, I'll pop my head in if I can find the time and an internet connection just to say "Na na nuh na na!" [Wink]

Ed.
 
Posted by Funean (Member # 2345) on :
 
Hee!

I'm rather happy to see these exchanges....it's a welcome change from the Plague of Sourness that has infected Ornery for the last week or so.

What's going on? Is it hot? Muggy? Are people posting while hungry? Not gettin' any? Folks sure have been cranky, and it's actually interfering with productive debate.

Pretty soon it's going to cause me to go rampantly silly, derailing threads with talk of jello and suchlike whenever there's any hint of nastiness....

Ricky had the right idea: mudwrestling for everyone!
 
Posted by kenmeer livermaile (Member # 2243) on :
 
Cranky sourness interfering with productive debate is standard around here, ma'am.

But some weeks are crankier than other weeks.
 
Posted by Funean (Member # 2345) on :
 
Look to the mud, ken!
 
Posted by The Drake (Member # 2128) on :
 
Ken even managed to provoke me. Or, I reacted sourly to his benign statements. Whichever.

We did have the poetry thread, that was unsour. Is unsour a word? It is now, I just invented it.

My brother just got back safely from Iraq, so I'm in a pretty darn good mood overall.
 
Posted by javelin (Member # 1284) on :
 
Congrats, Drake! Say "Thank you" for me, will you?
 
Posted by The Drake (Member # 2128) on :
 
Will do. He was outside Baghdad at one of the large FOBs. He wasn't quite sure if he was going to enjoy the 4th of July fireworks or not. I guess hearing and seeing explosions blow people to bits will change your perspective on gunpowder.
 
Posted by Funean (Member # 2345) on :
 
Hooray! Very good. And thanks for the good news. And thank him on my behalf, too. Is he done now?

Yes, I like the Ornery Epic....totally can't contribute, but enjoy it. More, please!
 
Posted by kenmeer livermaile (Member # 2243) on :
 
Regarding a certain recently locked thread:

canada wry, I think I recall the principles of Mr. Richter’s book sufficiently to do them marginal justice here for our purposes of inquiry.

“The Mountain on the Desert” used a partially fictionalized autobiographical setting to explain an idea called ‘psychoenergetics’, whose main tenet is that there is a mysterious something in the human individual, comparable to the Asian concept of Chi, that is as important to human functioning as blood and hormones.

It may not be a ‘thing’ but rather a coordinated composite of functions and effects within ourselves, but treating it as a thing makes it easier for us to probe its hypothetical existence and determine its functions. If anything, one might best conceive of it as the interface between another hypothetical entity – the human soul – and the human body.

It is manipulated chiefly through the mind, and is produced, stored and consumed through our actions, thoughts, and especially, words, which more than any other human function, integrate physical action with thought. Typing words as we do has less direct effect than vocalization; typing **** is scarcely as powerful as saying ****. Decamillennia of nonliteray verbalization versus a few centuries of literacy probably explain this difference.

Psychoenergics (PE) also resembles the basic principles of neurolinguistic programming (NLP) in that it stresses the importance of verbal expression in affecting psychoenergic flows, but it just as much stresses simple actions like retiring to a quiet dim place after exhausting exertion in bright loud settings, for example. (I’m doing this poorly and thus allowing some creepy ambience of, say, Dianetics or EST, to intrude. Not so. It’s just a book describing in a fictionalized setting some basic ideas. It offers no list of mental exercises or such. It is a work of practical philosophy, period.)

PE waxes and wanes. When one’s PE is low, one is low. But we have reserves. One can stimulate the reserves to flow by action. If one is frightened, one can pray to God, for example. The concept of God is huge and thus has NLP-ish access to immense stores of PE energy. Crying ‘God help me!’ is, in PE thought, not just a desperate appeal to the divine but a practical means of releasing much needed PE energy from within oneself.

Folks sorely ill have been known to get up and dance when exceptionally good news, or a long absent loved one, returns. Such events have even been the basis of ‘miracle cures’. PE thinking believes that PE is at least an important part of such phenomena, and perhaps even the sole explanation.

Likewise, one can say God damn it when something negatively impacts one, like a hammer hitting one’s thumb. The concept of damnation by an august deity is an immensely powerful concept huge releases huge flows of PE. Taking the Lord’s name in vain can lead to PE bankruptcy.

HOWEVER... those PE processes based on PE release via fear (which includes anger as a subset, fear being a ‘primary’ emotion and anger being a ‘secondary’ emotion), tend to run a deficit. Adrenaline is invigorating but leaves one weak and trembling after the fact. PE release processes based on things dire, as powerfully exemplified by God damn, are very attractive because they provide rich rapid PE flows, but they tend to drain the system, for when it comes to intense danger, our responses tend to all or nothing (fight,flight, or surrender). Using them too often depletes the system faster than it can replenish itself.

Conversely, using the also rich but not nearly so immediately satisfying stores of PE associated with hope and beneficial events typically provides lesser ‘flow rates’ of PE but these rates are far more sustainable and can be used to build a surplus of PE even as they are in process. They are compounding investments that take time but yield great results if pursued diligently.

A perfect example of the difference is saying God damn versus God bless. God damn is immediately powerful, even shocking, but God bless, over time, is more productive and leaves one stronger than before.

Both have their place. Some situations require intense immediate overwhelming flows of energy. Christ is said to have chewed His Daddy out on the cross, accusing Him of forsaking Him even though they’d planned it aforehand. Other situations themselves promote the gentler nurturing flows of hope/happiness based PE release.

Where judgement calls prove useful is in the in between states. Folks who curse at every little thing are, according to PE, spending foolishly and run the risk of steadily declining their overall being. Folks who curse sparingly and judiciously effectively fight fire with fire when needed (as in the way oil men snuff runaway wells on fire by blowing them out with explosives) but more often fight fire with water, which is rather hard work (being one’s own bucket brigade) but can produce greater overall strength and resilience.

The same concept relates to speech beside cursing/blessing, which are simply extremes. Incidentally, blessing overmuch can also be a drain on oneself and others just like cursing can be, as anyone who has spent a morning listening to zippy Xtians say Praise the Lord! every 30 seconds can attest.

Coupling richly evocative words together, of dire or hopeful nature, is effective, period. Thus the power of some poems to move us deeply while others just provide passing scenery we scarcely bother to look at. Shakespeare was a master at this, which is perhaps why so many of his written lines have become vernacular figures of speech. (I encourage those interested to post examples of these at Miscellaneous Chat.) This principle, coupled with cursing or blessing, is very powerful, as when one says God ****ing dammit, or Almighty Lord of Heaven, or Great day in the morning, or Damn it to Hell.

I believe in the idea of PE, at least in this regard of the power of speech on oneself and those in earshot, more than not. Being a pyrate by personal nature, I tend to enjoy hearty swearing, even in profusion, but I enjoy it in the context of richly blessed verbiage. Iwrote stories and poetry too. Life is full of the dire and the beneficial, the ugly and the beautiful, the desperate and the hopeful. I enjoy rich, full-bodied, Columbian coffee roasted very dark a la Francais that delivers a good bite and a heady aroma, and tend to drink it black, but for purposes of using coffee as an analogy on this topic, I’ll note that I also like it with honey, nutmeg, cinnamon, vanilla, and cream. The bitter and the sweet. Palate-cleansing java and tongue-coating honey’n’cream. Flush out the fould and paint over with fresh. Later. Rinse. repeat.

How all this fits in with notions of ‘common decency’, ‘politeness’, or ‘civil speech’ is frankly beyond myself who long ago abandoned a majority of the canons of human behavior as unsuitable for my own comfort and personal growth. This is especially true here where we regularly discuss such foul, shocking, dire things as war, the slaughter of livestock and, perhaps most revoltingly pernicious of all, voting for politicians. (Sign of the cross, necklace of garlic, use a wooden stake to punch out the chads...)

I do indeed know how to distinguish between what is commonly deemed civil or uncivil language. But I suffer from the affliction of being largely bored by most of what is verbally exchanged under that rubric. It is dull to me, even ennervating. Not without exception, to be sure, but far more so than not. Many of those who most consistently berate others here for their allegedly intemperate tongue offend me by the (to me) boringly narrow scope of their articulations. But I don’t think it would be polite of me to tell them to keep their often mousey expressions to themselves. We all must express what we have to express.

A closing note: one could tell folks gathered in fora like this that one loves them. There is truth to this. Many of us here have a deep urge to expand the bonds of our humanity among our fellow homo sapiens. But we all know how rapidly cloying this is. As I said before, according to PE it is possible to drain one’s PE reserves via blessing as well as by cursing.

But add a shadow of nemesis, cause some of the dire PE flows to trickle and occasionally surge, without there being something before uthem that requires their energy (imagine being hyped on fear-based adrenaline in a perfectly safe environment containing nothing more threatening than a teddy bear), and a kind word or profession of love then takes on a heightened meaning as its hope/benefit/blessing associated PE flows soothe and replenish those rapidly draining fear/danger/deficit associated PE flows. A balancing act.

And thus I ask us, in a manner recalled from an old Lord Buckley routine if, goddamit, it would embarrass us very much if we were to tell each other that we loved one another?

LOVE is the ultimate four letter word, to be used sparingly but unstingily. Try saying it at the next office meeting you attend. Tell your boss you love him/her, or address your colleagues with a profession of egalitarian affection. Gauge their reaction. You might just as well have said ****, although if one says **** You, well, that’s another matter altogether. We’re typically offended by folks pointing the love word at us when they’re not sufficiently within our sphere of intimacy, but we’re enraged when they aim the **** word at us – especially if they’re a member of the core of our sphere of intimacy. Direness evokes more powerful and demanding energy stimuli than does hopefulness. We’re more offended by professions of **** in polite company than professions of love, but we’re generally offended by both.

Yeah, some days I love y’all even though you regularly offend me with tepid speech and narrow ranges of inquiry/expression. Part of love is accepting people as they are. Politeness is about many things, many of them good, but it is not at all about accepting people as they are. The closest it comes to this is overlooking that about someone that offends oneself and passing it over in silence.

In other news:

Welcome home, Drake's brother.

"Ok I think I have let this go on long enough."

As for OM locking canadian's thread on exotic verbiage: I think someone ought to send him a warning letter. Like the old quip says:

If you're short enough, we're long enough. Which is to say that your timing, in this case, was atrocious. With censors like this, who needs behavioral guidelines?

[ July 06, 2005, 01:50 PM: Message edited by: kenmeer livermaile ]
 
Posted by cperry (Member # 1938) on :
 
KL wrote: "Yeah, some days I love y’all even though you regularly offend me with tepid speech and narrow ranges of inquiry/expression."

1) I definitely count on you to keep me from being to tepid and narrow -- both patterns of behavior that I believe I cultivated mainly out of desire not to attact negative attention or to offend.

2) You're certainly not one to fall into either of those traps! [Smile]
 
Posted by cperry (Member # 1938) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Funean:
Hooray! Very good. And thanks for the good news. And thank him on my behalf, too. Is he done now?

Yes, I like the Ornery Epic....totally can't contribute, but enjoy it. More, please!

Oh come on, Fun! You are so skillful with words. You orta try it!
 
Posted by Funean (Member # 2345) on :
 
Shameless flattering person!!! [Smile]

I have secretly tried, on my own little screen, and totally can't achieve meter or rhyme. It's sad, considering how much of my time I spend with Dr. Suess.

Goodness, what a long post from ken has appeared. I'd better go read it.
 
Posted by cperry (Member # 1938) on :
 
Yes, m'am.
Yes, I am!
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
I missed you guys too much, so I'm changing my sabbatical to a personal ban on discussing religion.

KE
 
Posted by Funean (Member # 2345) on :
 
Hooray!!!

I mean, hooray that you're back! I don't care what you talk about.

Besides, you'll be gone soon enough when you start your big new special mr. smarty pants job.
(congrats on that, btw)
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
Thanks Fun.

I'm going to be in Boston on the 7,8,9,& 10th of August for training introduction etc. I'm already planning on trying to have lunch with Ev, so if there are any of you with in driving distance I'd love to have you join us.

As for the training, I know a little about spetometry using diode arrays and that different elements absorb different portions of the light spectrum, but if we have any experts on the subject, or UV IR VIS analysis I'd love to pick your brain.

KE

[ July 06, 2005, 04:09 PM: Message edited by: KnightEnder ]
 
Posted by The Drake (Member # 2128) on :
 
"As for the training, I know a little about spetometry using diod arrays and that different elements absor different portions of the light spectrum, but if we have any experts on the subject, or UV IR VIS analysis I'd love to pick your brain."

Yeah, I did some of that before breakfast, you know - as a time filler. I found that looking directly at the sun through a pane of glass increases UV and IR absorption by the human retina to painful levels. [Cool]

"Hooray! Very good. And thanks for the good news. And thank him on my behalf, too. Is he done now?"

That's the $64 billion per year question, isn't it? He's supposed to be back here for a year before he would rotate back on a second tour. But that's dependent on a whole lot of factors, most of which have been bandied about here. [Smile]
 
Posted by FiredrakeRAGE (Member # 1224) on :
 
I believe someone mentioned speed limits in Indiana a few days ago. If anyone is interested, the posted limit has changed to 70 on all the interstate routes.

--Firedrake
 
Posted by canadian (Member # 1809) on :
 
Weird. This is the first time I've ever poked my head into this room.

No, that's okay, you don't have to hide your shame, continue what you're doing, this is a judgement free room.

[Wink]
 
Posted by The Drake (Member # 2128) on :
 
"Akbar & Jeff's Treatment Center
No Behavior Problem too big or too small
- Heroin Addiction
- Satan Worship
- Poor Posture
- Grabbing food from others
- Voting Republican

Where the elite meet to get back on their feet"
-- Life in Hell, by Matt Groening
 
Posted by Funean (Member # 2345) on :
 
I loved the Hell books. I believe I have Life, Love and Work. Does he still do those guys? I <heart> the rumpled, angry rabbits.

KE, I've just realized there are several obnoxious interpretations of my remarks to you above. I didn't mean any of those (in case you're snarling at me behind my back).

canadian, this is the fun sandbox. Sometime when you're really, really bored, read the entire thread in one sitting. It will give you a very strange, though entertaining, perspective on rather a large percentage of the people here.
 
Posted by The Drake (Member # 2128) on :
 
Sometimes it gets weird in here, but that's part of the fun. It's like the green room. Out THERE is onstage, and we have to perform. But in here, we can have little sandwiches, liquor, and whatever else strikes your fancy. No one challenges you to provide proof, you can't derail the thread by definition. Loads of Fun.

I remember when it got created, we wondered if anyone would use it [Smile]
 
Posted by Funean (Member # 2345) on :
 
quote:
Loads of Fun.
Well, I don't spend THAT much time in here...

<surreptiously packs up overnight bag and cooler>
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
Fun,

Coming from you I never even thought of it that way. See there are advantages to being the most reasonable person in the forum. [Razz]

And I will still be here, just not as much. Between the job and my boys being home for the summer I'm not going to get much computer time. But on the plus side I'll be getting a laptop from the company, and now I will be able to afford to fix the one laptop and three computers I have that are broke. Heck, maybe I'll be on more than ever, a computer in every room.

COOL [Cool]

Anybody have any ideas on why that one word transcends all barriers and is used by every age group? Of course there are always other words that come and go attempting to usurp "cools" reign, my son commented that the dark clouds gathering, as we headed out to practice baseball, looked "tight", and Jack O'Neil (SG1) uses "sweet" as people did a few years back, but they both say "cool" sometimes too. "Sometimes bad is bad, but cool is the rule." HL [Roll Eyes] I know, I'm a geek.

KE

[ July 08, 2005, 06:14 AM: Message edited by: KnightEnder ]
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
Anybody have a better way to spell-check? Other than using Word and cutting and pasting. Any way to do it here?

KE
 
Posted by cperry (Member # 1938) on :
 
KE - I was wondering that about "cool" a few weeks ago. (I was worried that I was too old now to use it and needed to find another positive descriptor).

It just hasn't gone out of style, as other have and will. My son says both "tight" and "sweet," both of which drive me nuts. But he'll say "cool" occasionally. Good question - why?
 
Posted by Funean (Member # 2345) on :
 
I realized quite some time ago that it was pretty much impossible for me to be er, cool. I was a geeky kid and now I'm a geeky grownup. So if it becomes uncool to say cool I will be no less cool. [Smile]

KE I keep a "new" email message up in a second window (outlook express). It's a wee bit faster than Word, plus Word seems to make my computer run poky, even when it's not doing anything. [Confused]
 
Posted by ender wiggin (Member # 9) on :
 
I heard someone say "groovy" the other day, and he wasn't being sarcastic. Maybe "groovy" will come back.
 
Posted by javelin (Member # 1284) on :
 
Crap, now we have to spell check? *grumble grumble*
 
Posted by Funean (Member # 2345) on :
 
I say swell and dandy a lot too, but I'm being silly.

Groovy is a groovy word.

/johnny bravo
 
Posted by A. Alzabo (Member # 1197) on :
 
quote:
Groovy is a groovy word.

/johnny bravo

Hey, wanna do the monkey with me?
 
Posted by Funean (Member # 2345) on :
 
"Oh Momma, I'm so sweet
that I've got a mouth
full of cavities!"

heeheehee
 
Posted by ssci (Member # 1053) on :
 
quote:
I heard someone say "groovy" the other day, and he wasn't being sarcastic. Maybe "groovy" will come back.
I use "groovy" fairly frequently, most often to avoid "cool".

My daughter overuses the term "tight". Usually in a form that allows me to purposely misunderstand:

"This outfit is 'tight'!"
"See if it comes in a larger size."
"Oh, Dad!"

[Smile]
 
Posted by ender wiggin (Member # 9) on :
 
Ya, but I imagine you are older than me. This was a young guy, like early 20s.

When old people use groovy it's not the same. [Wink]

[ July 08, 2005, 01:26 PM: Message edited by: ender wiggin ]
 
Posted by Funean (Member # 2345) on :
 
Oh, you're REALLY asking for it now, ender....
 
Posted by ssci (Member # 1053) on :
 
Man, if you were only within reach of my cane I'd show you a thing or two!
 
Posted by kenmeer livermaile (Member # 2243) on :
 
Groovy comes, I think, froim 'get in the groove', a Swing Era hipsterism that derives, I'll wager, from getting a clunky, havey, wind-up Victrola needle into the starting track of an old 78...

'Cool', coming from the Negro side of our culture (as do an astonishingly and disproportionately large number of 'hip slang') derives, I've concluded based on no historical data but my own pondering, from the fact that Negroes in our culture sweated under a blazing son more often than not.

'House niggars', generally the elite of a plantation, kept fairly cool compared to their cotton-picking fellows outside.

That's MY theory.
 
Posted by cperry (Member # 1938) on :
 
Interesting theory, KL.

The rest of y'all are just peachy keen.
 
Posted by Funean (Member # 2345) on :
 
And you're nifty!
 
Posted by kenmeer livermaile (Member # 2243) on :
 
Fabricating etymology from idle nonsense:

'Peachy keen' is probably a phonetic mongrelization of some obscure French trope like 'pincee conne' or something... it would seem to have lost something in translation, but then, as it is, 'peachy keen' is itself mysteriously meaningless.

Peachy sharp? Sharp enough to cut peach fuzz? Perhaps it's simply one of those thoughtless combinations of otherwise unrelated expressions, as if a tennager today were to combine 'it the bomb' with 'it's the ****' and say 'it's ****bomb'.

However, 'pinch idiot' is neither flattering nor kind. We may be reduced to searching a genuine etymology...

'Keen', anyway, is recorded as "A popular word of approval in teenager and student slang from c.1900."

Walking down a virtual avenue in an imaginary Lyons, I saw Funean and cperry strolling my way, arm-in-arm, shopping bags overflowing with ambulatorily dysfunctional but oh so enticing shoes. I could not help but say softly under my breath:

y'a du monde au balcon

Elsewhere:

gerber
means to barf. Does one think that Gerber baby foods sell well in France?

In France, is 'napalm' their slang for 'freedom fries'?

'sweated under a blazing son'? I MUST learn to type.

Kenmer notes that while there IS a slight trace of French in his geneology, he is decidedly Anglo-Saxon and prefers beer mugs to champagne glasses. Yes.

[ July 09, 2005, 11:21 AM: Message edited by: kenmeer livermaile ]
 
Posted by Funean (Member # 2345) on :
 
Beer mugs?! Brandy snifters, please. Less....cylindrical.
 
Posted by kenmeer livermaile (Member # 2243) on :
 
Ah... cognac IS the only liquer/liquor I really care for, although I often drink rum just for the principle of the thing, Island Girl...
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
A word I think is weird is "movie". If you think about how it came to be, meaning pictures that move. But now days when we say movie, we don't mean it as move-ees, or pictures that move (except in the abstract sense). It has taken on it's on meaning. Wouldn't it be strange if you heard someone way let's go see a move-ey?

Later "talkie" became the name for movies with sound. Can you imagine if that had caught on? "Talkie" would have become its own word and a talkie would not neccesarily meant picture with sound, it would have become its own word, as movie has, and it would not sound strange or evident that it was once meant to describe "what" the film consisted of.

It is hard for me to explain, but I hope you see what I mean. I think it is fascinating.

Ken,

Spiced rum is really good, as is Crown Royal, IMO. I used to drink "Myers Rum" when I was a kid because I liked rum and coke and I liked carrying around a bottle of rum with my name on it. [Smile]

KE
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
Any of the rest of you wish there was some way we could get closer, to people we like, love, and or admire? Sometimes I wish my wife and sons could actually "know" how I feel about them.

Like mind-melding, or something. The closest I think this kind of spiritual melding comes, IMO, is when actually "making love", (as opposed to having sex). But it is not possible with members of a sex that you don't have sex with. One day maybe we will find some way to do this, I hope so.

KE
 
Posted by Funean (Member # 2345) on :
 
I think this all the time, KE.

Words are so very inadequate at times.

Some times I stand over my kids while they're sleeping and wonder how it is that they *can't* feel the emotion pouring out of me. To me, it's nearly visible.
 
Posted by The Drake (Member # 2128) on :
 
As long as nobody develops telepathy. I don't want people to know the contempt in which I hold them [Smile]
 
Posted by kenmeer livermaile (Member # 2243) on :
 
"Any of the rest of you wish there was some way we could get closer, to people we like, love, and or admire? Sometimes I wish my wife and sons could actually "know" how I feel about them.
"

My fave peek into what direct mind-to-mind sharing might REALLY be like is in Gibson's work. Particular, an early short story called, I think, The Winter Market (or The Winter something-or-other), and his second novel, Count Zero. Gibson makes the very fine but crucial point that the raw gestalt of oneperson's brain might be incomprehensible to another, not necessarily because they don't process the same 'code/language' but because they use their own grammer/syntax in processing reality. Having a unqiue personality mans having a unique mode of interpreting reality.

With this in mind, one person's menmtal heaven could be another person's mental hell (to cite an extreme and extremely oversimplified example).

I rather agree with Gibson. Telapathic transmission would probably need to be homogenized, burned down to a level of reliable common denominatiors, then reformatted to another's personality.

Imagine one is very religious, and one's world view is throughly wrapped in the comforting vitual embrace of a Kinf and Wise and Benevolent Father in Heaven.

Now jack into their mind the lynx-eyed observations of someone who sees the world as strictly a series of inexplicable events structured by laws of unknown origin.

It's one thing for the former to intellectually conceive of the latter but another thing to steep their mind in it.
 
Posted by Pete at Home (Member # 429) on :
 
OK got a riddle for you.

Why did Helen of Troy turn down the contract to be the spokeswoman for Metamucil?
 
Posted by scifibum (Member # 945) on :
 
She didn't want to be the face that launched a thousand shi*s.
 
Posted by thegreatgrundle (Member # 1921) on :
 
quote:
Any of the rest of you wish there was some way we could get closer, to people we like, love, and or admire? Sometimes I wish my wife and sons could actually "know" how I feel about them.

Like mind-melding, or something. The closest I think this kind of spiritual melding comes, IMO, is when actually "making love", (as opposed to having sex). But it is not possible with members of a sex that you don't have sex with. One day maybe we will find some way to do this, I hope so.

It sounds a lot like the Human Instrumentality Project. I recommend you watch Neon Gensis Evangelion.
 
Posted by Pete at Home (Member # 429) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by scifibum:
She didn't want to be the face that launched a thousand shi*s.

Hey! I just made that up 2 days ago. Did you guess it just from the question?
 
Posted by scifibum (Member # 945) on :
 
Pete, I guessed it, but I had to go read a quick fact sheet on Helen of Troy. I was looking for possible laxative puns...so I had to work on it a little. [Smile]
 
Posted by kenmeer livermaile (Member # 2243) on :
 
"A word I think is weird is "movie"."

As our man Gibson said in an essay of his that I posted here recently, the word 'film' is also a term describing aidio-video imagery via a concept that, increasingly, no longer applies: photochemical emulsion ('film') on celluloid.

And when was the last tiem anyone saw images on a 'silver screen'?

Few things are 'turned on/off' anymore. Touch screen controls. ("He palmed the access panel. The door dilated.")

We await eagerly not only the advent of what Gibson called 'simstim' but also, the trope that will become its definitive term of identification.
 
Posted by offspringoftheintellect (Member # 2487) on :
 
Maybe this is a bad example, but the (movie, film, talkie?) Strange Days with Mr. Fiennes is a mystery set around technology that allows people to live out the experiences of others through a headset of sorts. Its called "jacking in" and in the picture it is used primarily as a drug.

If such technology existed, it would not only revolutionize the entertainment industry, but would become an empathy machine. (Perhaps like the smart hippies of the 70s thought MDMA would work.) It would also, like extacy, be used for evil, as the newest hammer in the hedonistic tool kit.
 
Posted by thegreatgrundle (Member # 1921) on :
 
Does anyone else really hate the Daily Show's new set? They got rid of the couch! How do you have a talk show without a couch? And I liked John's old ridiculously long desk. Ugh. They should be ashamed of themselves.

[ July 14, 2005, 10:55 AM: Message edited by: thegreatgrundle ]
 
Posted by kenmeer livermaile (Member # 2243) on :
 
"They should be ashamed of themselves."

They are. Their advisors told them public shaming would boost ratings [Wink]
 
Posted by thegreatgrundle (Member # 1921) on :
 
Brilliant strategy. People love watching other people make idiots of themselves. Just look at all that reality TV out there.
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
Ken,

Just got the Andy Griffith CD. Thank you so much. I really appreciate it. Is Robin your wife? Stacy was a bit concerned when she saw I was receiving things in the mail from women. I'll write more after I've listened to it, and after the new SG1 is over. Thanks again.

KE
 
Posted by kenmeer livermaile (Member # 2243) on :
 
Nah. Robin's my real name. Really. I'm not so fortunate to have been blessed outside the internet with a name so perfectly stuffy, ridiculous, yet plausibly genuine, with that faint touch of poetry in 'Kenmeer' and ludicrous edge of 'Livermaile', as Kenmeer Livermaile.

My fave track is one I'd never heard before, the love poem to whatchamawhomit: "Nay... it is a bite."

Now I just have to collect Brother Dave Gardner's ouvre and Jerry Clower's better stuff, and my life shall be complete.
 
Posted by Pete at Home (Member # 429) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by scifibum:
Pete, I guessed it, but I had to go read a quick fact sheet on Helen of Troy. I was looking for possible laxative puns...so I had to work on it a little. [Smile]

That's a relief. I was afraid that someone else had thought of the joke before me [Big Grin] May not be the funniest thing around, but I do prize my originality.
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
Ken,

Playing pro-softball I had a great friend named Robin Ryan. He was the epitomy of cool. In local games, where the rules for those of us classified as "open" players were laxed, a real ladies man, handsome with shoulder length jet black hair, he'd pitch with a cigarrette half-hanging out of his mouth and sunglasses on. And this was at night! So, I don't know why Stacy immediately assumed Robin was a womans name, other than natural jelaousy and suspicion.

Robin used to have a huge crush on Stacy, he even called and wished me "Happy Thanksgiving" out of the blue one year. I laughed at him and said "yeah, happy Thanksgiving Robin, if you want to talk to Stacy just say so." Man I miss being part of a team.

KE
 
Posted by scifibum (Member # 945) on :
 
quote:
That's a relief. I was afraid that someone else had thought of the joke before me May not be the funniest thing around, but I do prize my originality
pretty funny if you ask me
 
Posted by Molly Sargent (Member # 2522) on :
 
<<Nah. Robin's my real name. Really.>>

Hey, Robin Hood wasn't exactly a slouch. Also Robin Williams, although totally insane, is really funny. And I have always admired the bird.

Is this the same Andy Griffith that did "What it was was football"? It's still pretty funny stuff.
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
Molly,

I thought of Robin Hood, too. And yes it is the same Andy. Ken/Robin was good enough to send me a copy of it after he mentioned it, and I commented that I'd loved it as a child but had not heard it since. Also, I'd never met anyone but Ken that had even heard of it. Neither of us is really old enough to have been of that generation, but we both appreciate a lot of the same things. We're wacky in the same way, a lot of the time. I can't wait to play it for my kids, if I can get them off the damn computer long enough. Look who's talking, huh?
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
The new SG-1 was great! Ben Browder and Claudia Black were superb, though I will miss Jack immensely. But he's a single dad with a little girl to raise and I guess he has enough money and fame from General Hospital, MacGuyver, and SG-1 to last him. I hope he comes back for a cameo from time to time.

BSG was okay, although I keep waiting for the other shoe to drop. Eventually something different has to happen or they are going to lose me.

SG Atlantil I tivo'd as I was throwing baseballs with my boys so I'll have to get back to y'all on the last of the Sci-Fi Friday shows.

What did y'all think?

KE
 
Posted by Molly Sargent (Member # 2522) on :
 
KE,
I remember my dad and mom listening to that record when I was about six years old. And then when I was a teen, my dad had a bootlegged tape of a Lenny Bruce performance(reel to reel). I guess I had quite an eclectic childhood....<G>
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
I know what you mean. The first cursing I heard was Richard's Pryor's "Was it Something I Said?" 8-track when I was about 8.

KE
 
Posted by FiredrakeRAGE (Member # 1224) on :
 
KnightEnder -

Glad to hear SG1 was good. I don't get SciFi here in South Bend.

--Firedrake
 
Posted by ender wiggin (Member # 9) on :
 
Hey guys, I've been gone for a week taking a survivial course in New Jersey. (yes, laugh away.) I hope nobody called me out or anything and I wasn't there. If anything really needs to be addreseed, bring it to my attention, will ya? Far be it for me to run from an arugument.
 
Posted by thegreatgrundle (Member # 1921) on :
 
My hat's off to anyone who could survive a week in Camden [Wink]
 
Posted by FiredrakeRAGE (Member # 1224) on :
 
ender wiggin -

Survival course? Cool. Wilderness survival? (I am skeptical because it was situated in New Jersey [Wink] )

What all did you do?

--Firedrake
 
Posted by ender wiggin (Member # 9) on :
 
Ya, that's what everyone says. It was pretty cool. They showed us how to make a fire drill and and a hand drill, how to make snares and how to track stuff. The tracking part was the coolest, they showed us squirrel tracks in pine needles. I couldn't see them by myself, but when they pointed them out I could. They showed us how to find the direction and speed that someone is traveling from thier footprints. It was mostly classroom stuff though, they don't get to the really cool stuff until the later levels. This is the guy's website:

http://www.trackerschool.com/

The worst part was taking the bus to new jersey. Port authority sucks.
 
Posted by FiredrakeRAGE (Member # 1224) on :
 
ender wiggin -

Interesting. Expensive. You could probably learn a lot of that living in Yellowstone for a month or two. I've always wanted to do that.

--Firedrake
 
Posted by ender wiggin (Member # 9) on :
 
Ya, next time I have that much money I'm going to Cuba. Have to get there before Castro bites it and the americans take over.
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
Any of y'all see that movie The Edge with Anthony Hopkins and Alec Baldwin? It was a survivalist story, and an excellent movie.

Also, The Survivalist with Robib Williams and Walter Mathau was a pretty hilarious movie.

KE
 
Posted by JoshuaD (Member # 1420) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by KnightEnder:
Any of y'all see that movie The Edge with Anthony Hopkins and Alec Baldwin? It was a survivalist story, and an excellent movie.

That was a really good movie. I wish that one black actor would do more work. He played Mercutio in Romeo and Juliet, and is always stellar when I see him.
 
Posted by Funean (Member # 2345) on :
 
Aww! Just read on CNN:

James Doohan is dead, at 84.

Who will do the beaming up, now?
 
Posted by ender wiggin (Member # 9) on :
 
o"brien. but he isn't nearly as cool.
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
Josh, he was also in one or two of the last Matrix's, and yeah, he is really good.

KE
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
Did y'all see The Daily Show tonight?

Across Lance Armstrong's picture (for those of you living under rocks: Upon beating cancer and winning his 7th Tour De France, he is retiring) was the word "Quitter". That is one of the funniest things ever. [Smile]

KE
 
Posted by thegreatgrundle (Member # 1921) on :
 
That kind of reminds me of his cameo in Dodgeball. That was one of the funniest things ever. [Wink]
 
Posted by JoshuaD (Member # 1420) on :
 
Hey KE, you still playing poker?
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
Hey Josh, not nearly as much. This work thing is taking up a lot of my time, and the boys are home for the summer. I'll be playing more when I get a couple of my broken computers running (4).

KE
 
Posted by Everard (Member # 104) on :
 
Hey, KE, you get my email last night?
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
Yeah, they are supposed to be sending me an Itinerary so I'll know what my time will be like when I get there. I'm going 8-8 thru 8-12, and then back in September. I'll email you as soon as I know something.

KE

[ July 26, 2005, 11:32 PM: Message edited by: KnightEnder ]
 
Posted by Everard (Member # 104) on :
 
Awesome. I should be around that week.
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
Hey, just got back out of jail, again. Being poor in America sucks. Stacy wrote checks for groceries, when we were so poor we couldn't afford them, signing my name (my checks and I'd rather go to jail than her), and while she is out of town this week, with our good car, I made the mistake of driving to my father's to get his truck so I could make sales calls for my new job, and of course got pulled over and went back to jail. The police were great though. (Even though initially they treat me like a potential murderer, because my record pops up on their screen, I've got to get that expunged, it was twenty years ago for goodness sake.

Anyway, I had three Ultram in my pocket and the officer washed them down the sink, rather than charging me. Of course I don't know if I would have gotten the same great treatment if my dad wasn't an ex-police officer, but they treated me great. It's just embarrassing and degrading. I've got to dig myself out of this hole I've dug over the last five years. Well, this job is a start.

KE
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
Ev,

My boss called to tell me he was sorry but he hadn't gotten me a ticket to the Sox game since he didn't know I was coming until too late. Sucks that I won't get to see Fenway, but on the bright side I'll probably have one night, at least, open, and hopefully we can get together. I'll let you know the exact night(s) as soon as I know.

KE

[ July 29, 2005, 02:23 PM: Message edited by: KnightEnder ]
 
Posted by JoshuaD (Member # 1420) on :
 
KE: I must've missed where you explained your record. What happened?
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
When I was 18 I got in a fight and put two guys in the hospital (I had taken a lot of karate and been taught to fight by my police officer father who believed fighting was the answer to most problems & I was drunk (tequilla, uh)) Anyway, I got probation, and a month after I got off, I was 23 I put a marine (I knew he was a marine because he was bragging about being one and just having come back from Desert Storm. He was about 6'4" but thin.) in the hospital (kinda drunk again). More probation until I was 31. I served both of them, paid them off, did the community service, but I haven't had the money to have my record expunged, which I can do since they were both "deferred adjudication".

It cost me a lot of pain, time, and money.($20k in fines and hospital bills. I had to pay for the marines hospital bill, he had to have his jaw wired shut and his nose and some ribs were broken. I only hurt him that bad because after the first fight I let him up when he said he quit and then he kicked me again (broke my little finger, still can't close it).

Eventually I realized that I couldn't drink or put myself into situations like that (drinking, rednecks, etc.) and I sought out and found Zoloft. Nowadays you'd have to attack Stacy or the boys to get me to fight. Even when you win you lose.

In case y'all don't believe me about the Karate, I'll kick Ev in the face when I meet him in a couple of weeks. [Razz] (Just kidding Ev)

KE

[ July 29, 2005, 03:30 PM: Message edited by: KnightEnder ]
 
Posted by javelin (Member # 1284) on :
 
quote:
In case y'all don't believe me about the Karate, I'll kick Ev in the face when I meet him in a couple of weeks. [Razz] (Just kidding Ev)
Ah, come on! Just once? [Smile]
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
I don't know if y'all noticed, or care, but I've been engaging in religious discussions again. But when religion pervades everything from world politics/terrorism, to court cases and lying, how can one possibly avoid it?

Third amendment of vow; to remain civil while discussing religion.

KE
 
Posted by javelin (Member # 1284) on :
 
quote:
Third amendment of vow; to remain civil while discussing religion.
So, we can start a thread insulting each other's mom's, as long as it doesn't include religion? All right! You start! [Big Grin]
 
Posted by The Drake (Member # 2128) on :
 
Your Momma's a Republican. [Smile]
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
Let's get off moms. I just got off yours.

KE

(How's that for immature?) [Wink]
 
Posted by javelin (Member # 1284) on :
 
That was beautiful, KE.
 
Posted by JoshuaD (Member # 1420) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by The Drake:
Your Momma's a Republican. [Smile]

Your Momma voted for Nader. [Eek!]
 
Posted by The Drake (Member # 2128) on :
 
[Mad] At least my Momma didn't vote for Pat Buchanan by mistake, like your dumb Momma. [Cool]
 
Posted by javelin (Member # 1284) on :
 
Stupid irelevant and irreverent comment: someone posted "an excellent article over at Slate", and my first thought was "is that possible?" [Big Grin]
 
Posted by JoshuaD (Member # 1420) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by The Drake:
[Mad] At least my Momma didn't vote for Pat Buchanan by mistake, like your dumb Momma. [Cool]

DON'T GO THERE MAN. THAT'S NOT COOL.
 
Posted by The Drake (Member # 2128) on :
 
Since it's quiet in here,

GO RED SOX!
 
Posted by thegreatgrundle (Member # 1921) on :
 
Who cares about baseball? The Flyers just signed Peter Forsberg! That's real sports news!
 
Posted by Funean (Member # 2345) on :
 
Please, PLEASE let there be hockey this year....
 
Posted by thegreatgrundle (Member # 1921) on :
 
Of course there's going to be hockey. And we're gonna win the freaking cup, so there!

On a side note, to clear cap room, the Flyers dealt Jeremy Roenick to the Kings. While I'll miss his amusing mouth, there's no doubt Forsberg is an improvement, and the Flyers simply had too many centers. In fact, my boy Handzus may have to be moved, too.
 
Posted by The Drake (Member # 2128) on :
 
IF I want to see men with sticks, I'll go to a billiard hall. If I want to see men get hit, I'll watch rugby. If I want to see men on skates, I'll go to an ice pageant.

Hockey hasn't been cool since they started wearing helmets.
 
Posted by thegreatgrundle (Member # 1921) on :
 
Your Momma!
 
Posted by The Drake (Member # 2128) on :
 
Don't start that again! [Smile]
 
Posted by thegreatgrundle (Member # 1921) on :
 
Oh, but it was so much fun! [Wink]

Baseball hasn't been cool since they started wearing helmets, either. Let's see these guys crowd the plate when juiced-up pitchers are chucking 90 mph fastballs at their unprotected heads. They should bring back the spitball, too. Spitballs + no helmets never created any problems...

[ August 04, 2005, 03:11 PM: Message edited by: thegreatgrundle ]
 
Posted by The Drake (Member # 2128) on :
 
Well, ballplayers should at least get rid of the suit of armor that they don to go to the plate. Barry Bonds wears more crap than Russel Crowe.
 
Posted by thegreatgrundle (Member # 1921) on :
 
His massive, steroid-induced muscles and bulging, steroid-enlarged forehead should be protection enough. And he doesn't really need a cup, either, what with the steroids and all.
 
Posted by KnightEnder (Member # 992) on :
 
If they did all that there would be a hell of a lot more charging the mound. Baseball would be like hockey.

Biggio has been hit more times than anybody in the history of the game, and although he wears that elbow guard now, he didn't for most of his career. Pound for pound he's 10x as tough as Bonds. You put Biggio's heart and desire in Bond's body, you got the best baseball player ever.

KE

[ August 04, 2005, 10:42 PM: Message edited by: KnightEnder ]
 
Posted by Everard (Member # 104) on :
 
KE-
I'm gonna be gone for the weekend. Email with your schedule, and leave a way I can get in touch with you after sunday night, if you can still get together next week. I know a good bar and grill where we can go for dinner if you have an evening.
 
Posted by Mabus (Member # 2471) on :
 
Well, it looks as though I am back again.

I've been spending time messing about on minor projects at home; also futilely beating my head against the wall of Slacktivist. (I can't break away fully as I should because of the periodic Left Behind reviews.)

Usually my absences begin with a day or two when I don't have time to check the forum. I know that when I get back lots of messages will have scrolled and I either feel embarrassed about having to ignore them or overwhelmed by the number if I mean to read them.

How is Pete's son doing? I haven't seen anything very recent by him.
 
Posted by JoshuaD (Member # 1420) on :
 
quote:
How is Pete's son doing?