Author Topic: I hope it's not too late to wish everyone a Happy Captain Picard day!  (Read 2878 times)


DJQuag

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Cherry, the knowledge that Captain Picard day is a thing has made my day. Thank you. I'm off to confuse people on Facebook.

cherrypoptart

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I just found out myself too.

I just wish I had some Earl Grey tea...

 ;D

AI Wessex

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It's also Bloomsday, in honor of the day (June 16, 1904) when James Joyce had his first date with his real-life future wife.  The event is recreated in Ulysses and celebrated in Ireland and many other countries, and is a big reason why the book was banned and even burned for many years after it was published in 1922.
« Last Edit: June 16, 2016, 09:27:07 PM by AI Wessex »

Pete at Home

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It's also Bloomsday, in honor of the day (June 16, 1904) when James Joyce had his first date with his real-life future wife.  The event is recreated in Ulysses and celebrated in Ireland and many other countries, and is a big reason why the book was banned and even burned for many years after it was published in 1922.

Why would ANYONE ban and burn a book for anything so sweet and innocuous?

I found Ulysses and Portait impassable, and cannot imagine how anyone could feel emotional enough about his work to burn it.  I thought Ulysses was banned for antisemitism.  (My understanding is that Joyce himself wasn't antisemitic but that his main character was, reflecting general antisemitism in Ireland at the time.  So that the same sort of knee jerk PC twits wanted to ban Joyce for the same reason that they want to censor Mark Twain's characters that use the N word.)
« Last Edit: June 17, 2016, 10:29:25 AM by Pete at Home »

AI Wessex

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Joyce's first book was Dubliners, which was rejected by 15 publishers before...
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When the book finally did get printed, that entire edition was burned before reaching the public.

He didn't fare much better with Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man.  Ulysses was his third book, first published in Paris in serial form because nobody would then take the chance, and when the magazine got to the US...

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The New York Society for the Suppression of Vice, which objected to the book's content, took action to attempt to keep the book out of the United States. At a trial in 1921 the magazine was declared obscene and, as a result, Ulysses was effectively banned in the United States.

Here's one of the offending passages that led to the ban:
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Ah!

Mr. Bloom with careful hand recomposed his wet shirt. O Lord that little limping devil. Begins to feel cold and clammy. Aftereffect not pleasant. Still you have to get rid of it someway. They don't care. Complimented perhaps.

Yep, too raunchy for young or old ears!  The book went to trial in 1933 ("United States v. One Book Called Ulysses"), and the judge ruled that it was not obscene, concluding that:
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[W]hilst in many places the effect of Ulysses on the reader undoubtedly is somewhat emetic, nowhere does it tend to be an aphrodisiac.

Go figure...any of it!  FWIW, I read all of Joyce's work in college and am still a tad confused by Ulysses and totally lost by Finnegan's Wake.  The others are plain-spoken by comparison and great fun to read.

Pete at Home

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Al, gratitude for your help with my question.  I did spend 5 minutes googling before I asked, and none of this came up.


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The New York Society for the Suppression of Vice

Holy poo!  Shades of Soddy Arabia's "committee for the prevention of vice and promotion of virtue"


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Here's one of the offending passages that led to the ban:
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Ah!

Mr. Bloom with careful hand recomposed his wet shirt. O Lord that little limping devil. Begins to feel cold and clammy. Aftereffect not pleasant. Still you have to get rid of it someway. They don't care. Complimented perhaps.

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Yep, too raunchy for young or old ears!  The book went to trial in 1933 ("United States v. One Book Called Ulysses"), and the judge ruled that it was not obscene, concluding that:[W]hilst in many places the effect of Ulysses on the reader undoubtedly is somewhat emetic, nowhere does it tend to be an aphrodisiac.

Hardly even PG-13.  I can only infer that his commentary offended the theological school of "every-school-is-sacred."  Morons who think that Onan's sin was "spilling his seed on the ground" rather than his PURPOSE in doing so, i.e. defrauding his brother's widow of her inheritance while taking advantage of her sexually.  Same school of tweakers that say the sin of Sodom was sodomy, rather than attempted gang-rape.