Author Topic: OSC's latest book Gatefather & theological fantasy  (Read 3209 times)

Greg Davidson

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OSC's latest book Gatefather & theological fantasy
« on: December 24, 2015, 03:59:17 PM »
I am a little more than mid-way through OSC's 3rd book in the Mithermage cycle.  Without any spoilers, this book strikes me as a uniquely theological fantasy more than anything else (is that a new genre?).

Forgive my ignorance, but with the discussion of planets and souls, can anyone who has read this book tell me if there is any overlap with Mormon theology? Is this a Mormon version of midrash, the Jewish practice of storytelling to illuninate a percerived theologival truth. Or are the theological foundations a completely unrelated creation of the author himself? 

Pete at Home

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Re: OSC's latest book Gatefather & theological fantasy
« Reply #1 on: December 25, 2015, 02:12:16 PM »
Ka and Ba have no place in LDS theology but card has done great work tying together Egyptian and other theologies.

The LDS concept of a preexistence, and "This One" (Jehovah/Jesus) are very clear references.  And the references to the New Testament are common to all Christian theology, including LDS.

The idea of Satan and his devils as weaker than us, but prevailing through experience and deception, fits LDS theology and also other Christian views, e.g. the Screwtape letters.


Seriati

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Re: OSC's latest book Gatefather & theological fantasy
« Reply #2 on: December 28, 2015, 11:48:48 AM »
I have not read it, but theological fantasy is not unique.  Muirwood books, maybe just electronic, are a recent example.  David Eddings did 6 books in less sophisticated way (Elenium and Tamuli series) and plenty of fantasies derive their powers from specific philosophies (e.g. the Force).

Pete at Home

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Re: OSC's latest book Gatefather & theological fantasy
« Reply #3 on: January 04, 2016, 01:33:30 PM »
I very much enjoyed the series, particularly the second book. 

I consider it less "theological fantasy" than Star Wars or even Stargate, but more so than, say, Blade Runner :)