Author Topic: Lack of Free Speach in Europe  (Read 866 times)

Seriati

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Lack of Free Speach in Europe
« on: September 28, 2017, 10:05:34 AM »
I'm always disturbed by the lack of belief in freedom of speech in Europe, but when it impacts social media companies it becomes an issue for us in the US as well. There is no way that abusive anti-speech laws in Europe will not end up getting applied platform wide.  With China they segregated off the Chinese network and restricted it more heavily, but with Europe it is inside the Firewall and impacts us all.

http://money.cnn.com/2017/09/28/technology/hate-speech-facebook-twitter-europe/index.html

I'm about to the point, where I want the US to file a WTO complaint for punitive fines on US companies in this context, or to otherwise impose punitive tariffs as a response.

D.W.

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Re: Lack of Free Speach in Europe
« Reply #1 on: September 28, 2017, 02:38:28 PM »
I'm with you on this being likely to impact those in the US because tailoring your product/service to two or more sets of rules doesn't make good business sense. 

The issue is this is money on the table if you tell them you won't accommodate their laws / demands.  I don't think "the US" has any means of addressing this.  It's up to the individual company to decide. 

The question is, with some of the power these companies have, (regardless of how alarming that power may be), could they just say "no"?

At what point is some of this technology so desired or "necessary" (in our minds anyhow) that they can just say, "Your laws are silly, we don't agree.  Change them or don't use our product." 

TheDeamon

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Re: Lack of Free Speach in Europe
« Reply #2 on: September 28, 2017, 03:32:17 PM »
I'm with you on this being likely to impact those in the US because tailoring your product/service to two or more sets of rules doesn't make good business sense.

Google already does this with YouTube. They "GeoIP fence" plenty of content. Find a Canadian(or European) and ask them about them about their ability to access content that any American can view with ease.

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The issue is this is money on the table if you tell them you won't accommodate their laws / demands.  I don't think "the US" has any means of addressing this.  It's up to the individual company to decide.

There isn't really much need for the US Government to get involved, IMO. If there is a "commercial advantage" in providing a less restrictive free-speech platform, a service provider in the US will make it so, and the European(and other nations) restrictive policies will in turn restrict them from being able to compete in that sphere. Those platforms can "IP fence" their content so they remain technically compliant with the European Restrictions. Now if their own citizens happen to setup VPNs or Proxy servers in the United States as a result(and making more money for US companies) so they can present a US-based IP to such internet services, it isn't the internet service provider's fault.  8)

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The question is, with some of the power these companies have, (regardless of how alarming that power may be), could they just say "no"?

At what point is some of this technology so desired or "necessary" (in our minds anyhow) that they can just say, "Your laws are silly, we don't agree.  Change them or don't use our product."

They'll either comply company-wide, or erect firewalls/IP fences to comply with the requirements.

The bigger concern is the SJW-contingent within the tech sector that are going to cite "technical challenges and costs" with segregating their services as an excuse to use those rulings as an excuse to crack down on users in the US. But that brings us back to their in turn creating a market opportunity for someone else to provide services for said content. Then it becomes an issue for the consumers to settle.