Author Topic: Drag Kids  (Read 154 times)

Crunch

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Drag Kids
« on: June 10, 2019, 08:27:21 AM »
Anyone seen this?

There’s a lot developing around so called “drag kids” (Google will give you much more information). Essentially they dress up young boys in sexy outfits with makeup and the works, including one in a transparent dress, where they perform for adults. In another incident, the of drag kids, Desmond is Amazing, gets all sexed up and dances while grown men shower him with tips.

These kids are used as LGBTQ activists. You know, lots of 10 and 12 your olds are focused on that. Many of these kids start dressing in drag as early as 5 or 6, Desmond started at 2.

Look, this is child abuse. It’s sickening. CPS should be called in and these kids removed to a safe place.
« Last Edit: June 10, 2019, 08:30:22 AM by Crunch »

TheDrake

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Re: Drag Kids
« Reply #1 on: June 10, 2019, 09:12:13 AM »
This is one facet of a disturbing sexualization of children that includes beauty pageants and dance recitals.

Crunch

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Re: Drag Kids
« Reply #2 on: June 10, 2019, 09:33:34 AM »
Dance recitals? I went to a dance recital for my niece a few years ago - she was doing ballet and it was only family members of the kids performing that attended. I think there's a huge difference between that and dressing young boys up in sexy clothes to dance for strangers and tips. Do you not?

Crunch

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Re: Drag Kids
« Reply #3 on: June 10, 2019, 09:52:46 AM »
Another facet of this was Snapchat's "Love has no age" filter that was released this month. It was pulled once conservative twitter erupted but how did it get out there to begin with?

TheDrake

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Re: Drag Kids
« Reply #4 on: June 10, 2019, 11:49:03 AM »
For dance recitals, I'm not speaking of every single one of them. I'm not going to google for them, but I'll bet you can find video of prepubescent girls twerking in an organized demonstration. I know I've seen routines with middle schoolers performing at sporting events that felt inappropriate to me.

I don't see any difference between dressing a girl up in makeup and a dress and doing the same with a boy. But that's because I've accepted that kids know if they are gay at a young age, and that parents should be supportive of that choice.

rightleft22

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Re: Drag Kids
« Reply #5 on: June 10, 2019, 04:16:53 PM »
Quote
But that's because I've accepted that kids know if they are gay at a young age

I've often wondered about that. When I think back the concept of questioning gender and sexual preference never occurred to me. Not fully consciously anyway.
True one of the worst things you could be call back then was gay or homo however I didn't fully understand what the meant until well into my teens, and even then.
Perhaps if I did feel a attraction to the same sex I would have been more conscious of the question. 

In hindsight its difficult to imagine I knew anything at that age, even though as a teenager I thought I knew it all.

Crunch

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Re: Drag Kids
« Reply #6 on: June 10, 2019, 04:23:17 PM »
I would suggest that before you were 10 years old you probably weren't attracted to girls either. Most boys want nothing to do with girls until they approach, or even enter, their teen years. Pushing the idea that elementary school age children are aware of sexuality is more of a NAMBLA argument than anything else.

rightleft22

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Re: Drag Kids
« Reply #7 on: June 10, 2019, 04:42:29 PM »
Not aware of any NAMBLA arguments however I can imagine.
Before puberty what did I know of sexuality.... that it was 'a something' to be ashamed of, however that would have been more subconscious then knowing
I grew up in a religious environment at a time it wasn't something you talked about let alone questioned.

TheDrake

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Re: Drag Kids
« Reply #8 on: June 10, 2019, 06:08:57 PM »
I've often wondered about that. When I think back the concept of questioning gender and sexual preference never occurred to me. Not fully consciously anyway.
True one of the worst things you could be call back then was gay or homo however I didn't fully understand what the meant until well into my teens, and even then.
Perhaps if I did feel a attraction to the same sex I would have been more conscious of the question. 

Kids wind up having "crushes" about 5th or 6th grade. That's 11 or 12, and usually when gay adults report knowing they are different. Some them didn't find out how they were different until later. Puberty lands in or around this area. Would they know if they are 5 or 6? Maybe. I know gender roles are socialized almost as soon as kids start wearing clothes, which can start with pink and blue jumpers. Race car bed versus princess bed. Luckily clothing styles are becoming more neutral - little girls are less likely to be made fun of for lack of femininity. Little boys however are going to get quite the reaction if they want to wear a skirt.

LetterRip

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Re: Drag Kids
« Reply #9 on: June 11, 2019, 01:03:45 PM »
I would suggest that before you were 10 years old you probably weren't attracted to girls either. Most boys want nothing to do with girls until they approach, or even enter, their teen years.

Sexual attraction onset starts with puberty - and puberty onset has large variability,

Quote
For girls, puberty is generally considered to be too early if it begins at age seven or eight. African-American and Hispanic girls tend to start puberty slightly earlier than Caucasian girls. The average age of pubertal onset in girls is 10-and-a-half years old, but it ranges from seven to 13 years old. [...] For boys, puberty is generally considered too early before the age of nine years.  In boys, onset of puberty is from nine to 14 years, but on average starts at 11-and-a-half to 12 years old.

https://www.dukehealth.org/blog/when-puberty-too-early

Quote
Cognitive markers of sexual desire emerge during early puberty, including identifiable sexual thoughts and sexual attractions. About 25% of young adults report “thinking a lot about sex” as 11–12 year olds (both boys and girls) (Larsson & Svedin, 2002). Based on reports of fourth- and fifth grade (ages 9–11 years) American boys and girls, 16% reported self-relevant sexual thoughts (Butler, Miller, Holtgrave, Forehand, & Long, 2006). In a sample of Spanish boys and girls, about 6% of 9–10 year old boys reported sexual fantasies, increasing to 66% among 13–14 year olds. Among girls, 15% of 13–14 year olds reported fantasies, with none reported by 9–10 and 11–12 year olds (Arnal & Llario, 2006).

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3761219/

So about 15% of 10 year olds are having sexual fantasies - 15 out of a 100 students is a fairly significant number.  Reality doesn't care about our squeamishness.
« Last Edit: June 11, 2019, 01:06:12 PM by LetterRip »

Seriati

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Re: Drag Kids
« Reply #10 on: June 12, 2019, 11:54:56 AM »
For dance recitals, I'm not speaking of every single one of them. I'm not going to google for them, but I'll bet you can find video of prepubescent girls twerking in an organized demonstration. I know I've seen routines with middle schoolers performing at sporting events that felt inappropriate to me.

You certainly can, and you can find specific criticism of those events almost anywhere you look.  You can also find big changes in many of them over time (school uniforms for example have trended towards less revealing).  What you'd almost never find is say, grown men showering little girls with tips.  Just about everyone would instantly understand how inappropriate that is, if that's what happening in the drag shows it's over the line.

Otherwise I have no more problem with a kids drag show than I have with an equivalent pageant or dance routine.  If any of them are sexualized they are inappropriate, if they are not, to each their own.

As far as the age thing goes, it definitely varies, some of the kids' friends had crushes at 8-9, others didn't until 13-14.  A lot of coming out events in middle school.