Author Topic: coronavirus  (Read 84943 times)

DonaldD

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Re: coronavirus
« Reply #2450 on: October 26, 2020, 09:28:51 AM »
Some thoughts on "long COVID" post-COVID syndromes [ul=https://www.health.harvard.edu/blog/the-tragedy-of-the-post-covid-long-haulers-2020101521173]from the Harvard Medical School[/url]

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Tens of thousands of people in the United States have such a lingering illness following COVID-19. In the US, we call them post-COVID “long haulers.” In the United Kingdom, they are said to be suffering from “long COVID.”

Published studies (see here and here) and surveys conducted by patient groups indicate that 50% to 80% of patients continue to have bothersome symptoms three months after the onset of COVID-19 — even after tests no longer detect virus in their body.

DonaldD

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Re: coronavirus
« Reply #2451 on: October 26, 2020, 10:03:05 PM »
And depressingly, the numbers continue to increase unabated.

Today saw the highest new-daily-case count for a Monday, and a new record was set for the highest 7-day average of new daily cases according to Worldometer: ~70,000.

Hospitalizations are increasing, and the daily deaths are also now starting to tick upwards.

wmLambert

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Re: coronavirus
« Reply #2452 on: October 27, 2020, 01:41:06 PM »
Why has the number of deaths caused by ifluenza decreased by over 98% worldwide? Has Covid killed off the flu?

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-8875201/Has-Covid-killed-flu.html?ito=social-twitter_mailonline&__twitter_impression=true

msquared

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Re: coronavirus
« Reply #2453 on: October 27, 2020, 01:42:20 PM »
Because precautions that work for Covid work even better for flu?  Social distancing, masks, washing hands, more people getting flu shots? Is this a surprise to you?

wmLambert

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Re: coronavirus
« Reply #2454 on: October 27, 2020, 01:45:18 PM »
Because precautions that work for Covid work even better for flu?  Social distancing, masks, washing hands, more people getting flu shots? Is this a surprise to you?

You mean 72,000 deaths due to the flu has suddenly become close to zero? If it works for the flu, why not for Covid?

msquared

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Re: coronavirus
« Reply #2455 on: October 27, 2020, 01:49:38 PM »
Because Covid is not the flu? Have you not been listening? And the same behaviors may have better effects on flu vs Covid. Does not mean they should not be used for Covid, but a dramatic decline in flu shows that they can work.

Not sure what your point is with this.

wmLambert

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Re: coronavirus
« Reply #2456 on: October 27, 2020, 01:51:16 PM »
If you red the article, it seems flu, which is readily identifiable as different from Covid-19, has almost vanished. If the vaccines for Covid work, will we be rid of both?

msquared

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Re: coronavirus
« Reply #2457 on: October 27, 2020, 01:54:58 PM »
if the vacccines for Covid work as well as the flu ones due, and we continue to mask and social distance, then we will reduce the number of cases dramaticaly.

You know the other actions that are recommended to slow the spread of Covid also affect the spread of other viruses as well. Like flu and cold. I bet the number of colds reported are down dramatically.

Just because flu cases are down dramatically this year does not mean that they will not come back in future years when we stop wearing mask and stop washing hands so much and stop socially distancing.

Still not sure what your point is.

wmLambert

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Re: coronavirus
« Reply #2458 on: October 27, 2020, 04:16:55 PM »
if the vacccines for Covid work as well as the flu ones due, and we continue to mask and social distance, then we will reduce the number of cases dramaticaly.

You know the other actions that are recommended to slow the spread of Covid also affect the spread of other viruses as well. Like flu and cold. I bet the number of colds reported are down dramatically.

Just because flu cases are down dramatically this year does not mean that they will not come back in future years when we stop wearing mask and stop washing hands so much and stop socially distancing.

Still not sure what your point is.

Of course you know what the point is. The Covid-19 pandemic is not the end-all and be-all to health and safety. Tell the mother of a suicide victim that lock-downs is better than getting a mild case of the sniffles. Protect the endangered, but not every aspect of human endeavor.

yossarian22c

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Re: coronavirus
« Reply #2459 on: October 27, 2020, 04:31:18 PM »
Of course you know what the point is. The Covid-19 pandemic is not the end-all and be-all to health and safety. Tell the mother of a suicide victim that lock-downs is better than getting a mild case of the sniffles. Protect the endangered, but not every aspect of human endeavor.

I looked, I couldn't find any data about suicide rates for 2020. 2018 was the most recent year with full stats on the CDC webpage. Do you have evidence that the suicide rate is actually much higher during the pandemic? Suicides have been increasing for over a decade. I believe the pandemic, economic, and social stressors could increase the suicide rate, I just wasn't able to find anywhere that quantified it yet.

msquared

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Re: coronavirus
« Reply #2460 on: October 27, 2020, 04:32:46 PM »
And has it gone up 225,000 people in 8 months?100,00? 10,000?

wmLambert

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Re: coronavirus
« Reply #2461 on: October 27, 2020, 04:44:04 PM »
And has it gone up 225,000 people in 8 months?100,00? 10,000?

I guess you tell that mother her kid's death was unimportant because 224,999 are still alive. What is so hard to understand that sniffles and suicides are not equivalent on a one-to-one basis?


yossarian22c

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Re: coronavirus
« Reply #2462 on: October 27, 2020, 04:48:40 PM »
And has it gone up 225,000 people in 8 months?100,00? 10,000?

I guess you tell that mother her kid's death was unimportant because 224,999 are still alive. What is so hard to understand that sniffles and suicides are not equivalent on a one-to-one basis?

225,000 coronavirus deaths. The suicide death is tragic but so are 225,000 deaths and millions more with a lengthy illness from covid. The question was how much has the suicide rate changed? Suicides were already at a pretty high level before the pandemic. So unless we can see what the increase was its hard to attribute any individual suicide death to the pandemic. If we had the population level data we may see an increase in suicide deaths. For reference there were 47,173 deaths in 2017 and 48,344 deaths in 2018. How many suicide deaths have there been in 2020?

rightleft22

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Re: coronavirus
« Reply #2463 on: October 27, 2020, 04:57:07 PM »
And has it gone up 225,000 people in 8 months?100,00? 10,000?

I guess you tell that mother her kid's death was unimportant because 224,999 are still alive. What is so hard to understand that sniffles and suicides are not equivalent on a one-to-one basis?

I don't disagree that the social, economic and health issues related to a lock down need to be factored in. However your statement that "I guess you tell that mother her kid's death was unimportant because.."  Is not different then "I guess you tell that child their parents death was unimportant because... for most people its just the sniffles... and economy.

The idea that a middle ground is possible seems to evade you. We can, if everyone takes the steps to look after themselves and others keep people reasonably safe from the and keep things open.

msquared

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Re: coronavirus
« Reply #2464 on: October 27, 2020, 04:59:05 PM »
Tell that to the 18 year old college kid who just died of Covid. And yes, young kids are dying from Covid as well.

DonaldD

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Re: coronavirus
« Reply #2465 on: October 28, 2020, 10:30:57 PM »
And... a new highest new-daily-case record set at 81,581, almost 9,000 cases higher than the next highest Wednesday count, and the 7-day average exceeds the next highest 7-day average (set just yesterday) by about 2,500 cases.

Here are the 7-day averages for the past week - scary:
Today    75323 **
Tuesday 72874 **
Monday  70999 **
Sunday  69441
Saturday 67739
Friday    64615
Thursday 63231

** New 7-day record

DonaldD

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Re: coronavirus
« Reply #2466 on: October 29, 2020, 09:40:42 PM »
Ugh.

A 10,000 case increase reported today from yesterday, once again breaking the record just set one day ago.

It's almost certain that the new daily case count will exceed 100,000 by next Friday.

TheDrake

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Re: coronavirus
« Reply #2467 on: October 29, 2020, 09:51:00 PM »
Ugh.

A 10,000 case increase reported today from yesterday, once again breaking the record just set one day ago.

It's almost certain that the new daily case count will exceed 100,000 by next Friday.

We're doing our part in Texas! We contributed seven thousand of those, a 47% increase over a two week period. Coupled with a 38% increase in hospitalization.

cherrypoptart

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Re: coronavirus
« Reply #2468 on: October 30, 2020, 12:39:37 AM »
Biden:

"I'm not going to shut down the economy. I'm not going to shut down the country. I'm going to shut down the virus."

He talks about getting enough PPE for everyone. That's fine. What I'm wondering is would that really be enough to open the schools safely? People already have masks. Schools open. People get infected. They close again. Apparently masks are not enough. Medical workers including the doctor in China who died of Covid-19 after sounding the alarm had PPE and used it but still got infected. He believed he got it from not wearing eye protection. I'm not seeing how children in school are going to be wearing eye protection or how they'll be wearing masks in the cafeteria while they are eating. We all heard at the beginning how masks need to be fitted and stay tight. Not seeing how that is going to happen with school children either. My point? This guy is just selling pie in the sky.

And he's selling more by going on about how great Obamacare is in providing "free" vaccines. How much could a vaccine really cost? You can get the flu vaccine for $25-30. Is this one really going to be that much more expensive? Even if it's a $150, my point is it's not free under Obamacare when Obamacare costs $6500 or more in premiums for a family of four. Getting the vaccines without Obamacare will probably only cost a few hundred dollars. And I'm fine with it being "free" for everyone regardless of Obamacare anyway, paid for with tax dollars for anyone willing to get it since that would be a very small price to pay to get our lives back. The point again though is that this guy is just full of malarkey. One of my biggest pet peeves nowadays is the misuse of the word "free" all the time. Vaccines with Obamacare are NOT free if the premiums are thousands of dollars. They are "at no additional cost" just like most so-called "free" stuff.

The main thing though is that the trade-off will be the same no matter who is the President, the choice between the economy and lives. This guy acting like he's got all the answers is nonsense. There is no way to get the economy back on track as far as back to normal no matter how much PPE and masking you have because it all breaks down at the weak point every mob boss could tell you about: "Everyone's gotta eat." So much of our economy depends on that including theaters, restaurants, schools, and travel.  And that's not even getting into the other less appetizing problem of using the restroom. Most don't have lids so every time you flush you could be sending viral droplet riding particles into the air and since very few people are wearing eye protection good luck with that. Sure the chances may be low but when you are talking hundreds or thousands of people like in a school or airport or crowded theater over the course of a week that's probably going to be a problem. I'm not sure if they studied it but it seems like that should be a concern for re-opening things.

Bottom line: I'm not seeing how it's safe to reopen most things for quite a while yet.

So as not to be a Debby Downer and end on an optimistic note, I will say that using the curbside pickup for groceries the last month has been great. And I've been getting my water refills outside at the Watermills so though not as convenient it seems like it's very safe. Frankly, I'm not seeing how the curbside pickup is cost-effective for the grocery stores. That saves so much time for the customer that it's be a delight to use it even without the pandemic. I see how they go around in the stores and I assume they are picking up the stuff for different people in their little carts and then putting all the carts together for each person at the end instead of shopping for each person individually but now I'm not sure how they do it. It is a little miracle of micro-logistics though if it's cost-effective.

yossarian22c

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Re: coronavirus
« Reply #2469 on: October 30, 2020, 09:21:06 AM »
And... a new highest new-daily-case record set at 81,581

And sadly that record only stood for a day. Yesterday had 88,521. Another 7,000 increase from the day before.

msquared

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Re: coronavirus
« Reply #2470 on: October 30, 2020, 09:25:29 AM »
We have the best numbers. No one even comes close. Not even that third world ****hole of Brazil can catch us. Winning.

rightleft22

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Re: coronavirus
« Reply #2471 on: October 30, 2020, 09:40:57 AM »
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The main thing though is that the trade-off will be the same no matter who is the President, the choice between the economy and lives
That's a false choice if framed as a either or, all or nothing question. Their is a lot of options between turning the taps on full blast and shunting them off. Biden seems to be taking about managing the crises and getting everyone to work together.

The reality is that calculation of risk is always involved in democracy, health, economy... Do seat belts save lives? Do they add to the cost of buying a car? Should wearing seat belts be mandatory and enforced? What of air bags... What does that say about the notion a freedom, individual freedom, society freedom? Freedom a exercise of setting boundaries...

A issue with Trumpism is that it can't allow for nuance, a middle way. Trumpism relies on polarization, a win lose calculation in the defining of freedoms boundaries. To do so the party must remain blind to contradictions.

The Party that is "Pro-Life" is also the party that wants to dismantle the social safety net that might give the children saved a chance at a good life.  'Pro Life' but willing to sacrifice the lives of the older generation for the sake of the economy and there own life????

DonaldD

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Re: coronavirus
« Reply #2472 on: October 30, 2020, 10:19:54 AM »
What if - just imagine - Trump had come out forcefully, unambiguously, and consistently in favour of people wearing masks, keeping distance between people whenever possible, and limiting unnecessary social gatherings?  Instead of mocking people for doing the same, and even suggesting that masks increased infections?  And instead of consistently modelling the exact opposite behaviour?

How much better off would the economy be now?(not to mention, you know, people's health).  Hint - that would not actually be a trade off between the economy and lives.  Having done as suggested would have improved BOTH metrics.

msquared

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Re: coronavirus
« Reply #2473 on: October 30, 2020, 10:26:41 AM »
That is my major complaint about Trump and the virus.  He could not have stopped the spread with our open society, but he could have been a national leader and modeled good behavior and made mask wearing a patriotic duty.  My guess is our numbers would be much lower and the economy would be in much better shape. And that is on him.

cherrypoptart

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Re: coronavirus
« Reply #2474 on: October 30, 2020, 01:09:45 PM »
I knew from the beginning that the WHO and our own government health experts were insane for saying people not only don't need to wear masks but actually should not be wearing masks. I knew they were lying and I knew why they were lying. And I also knew it would come back to bite us when their inevitable about-face came and they said we all needed to wear masks. Of course I'm never one to say I told you so but I told you so. I agree Trump should have gotten out in front of this at the beginning. It would have been nice if he would have been a rebel and told people not to listen to the WHO and our own Surgeon General and to wear masks even if they weren't N-95s which our health care providers needed. It would have been nice if he would have encouraged mask wearing as patriotic when the WHO and our own health experts came to their senses, stopped lying, and finally recommended it. It would be nice even now if he would do more to encourage mask wearing. Just going to go on the record again saying that masks are absolutely necessary to have any chance of slowing this thing down. They aren't 100% effective of course especially since we still don't have enough N-95s for everyone, but they are probably at least 80% more effective than not masking.

DonaldD

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Re: coronavirus
« Reply #2475 on: October 30, 2020, 01:24:07 PM »
That is a misrepresentation of history.  Yes, there was a one-month period where a) it was initially unclear whether the virus was airborne, and then just how much it could be transmitted through the air and b) where there was insufficient PPE for first responders and health care personnel.

But by the end of March, those instructions had been changed.  That was 7 months ago.  And as you observed, the direction was a function of the scarcity of masks; but here is the kicker - Trump had to have been informed of that rationale earlier than the public.  So when Fauci and the CDC changed their tune, he was already in possession of the relevant information.  There was no excuse at that time (did I mention 7 months ago?) not to come out strongly in support of mask wearing, of civil society manufacturing their own masks to alleviate the manufacturing backlogs, and so on.

Trying to excuse Trump for NOT taking appropriate action once he knew better, because in the early days of the pandemic they were running somewhat blind is... lame.


msquared

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Re: coronavirus
« Reply #2476 on: October 30, 2020, 01:39:05 PM »
My wife made all of our masks.  I am sure many older folks who know how to sew made their own as well. And before Noel comes on here and says the home made masks and the other non N-95 masks are not as effective as the better masks  so we are just trading safety, something would have been better than nothing. 

 We will hit 229,000 dead today. Less than 9 months.

yossarian22c

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Re: coronavirus
« Reply #2477 on: October 30, 2020, 01:52:49 PM »
Of course you know what the point is. The Covid-19 pandemic is not the end-all and be-all to health and safety. Tell the mother of a suicide victim that lock-downs is better than getting a mild case of the sniffles. Protect the endangered, but not every aspect of human endeavor.

Tell this SC family that Covid-19 is the case of a sniffles. 81 days in the hospital and serious long term health conditions.

https://www.wbur.org/hereandnow/2020/10/30/coronavirus-long-hauler-family


wmLambert

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Re: coronavirus
« Reply #2478 on: October 30, 2020, 03:45:10 PM »
Of course you know what the point is. The Covid-19 pandemic is not the end-all and be-all to health and safety. Tell the mother of a suicide victim that lock-downs is better than getting a mild case of the sniffles. Protect the endangered, but not every aspect of human endeavor.

Tell this SC family that Covid-19 is the case of a sniffles. 81 days in the hospital and serious long term health conditions.

https://www.wbur.org/hereandnow/2020/10/30/coronavirus-long-hauler-family

Apples and oranges. Yes, people die. Every year we have about the same number of deaths every year. About the same now even with Coronavirus. We also now have more amelioratory treatments that have helped a lot, and vaccines on the way. Most who contract Covid-19 don't even show symptoms, and a few have the sniffles. Please explain why this demands lockdowns and anything but voluntary actions?

DonaldD

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Re: coronavirus
« Reply #2479 on: October 30, 2020, 03:53:26 PM »
Every year we have about the same number of deaths every year. About the same now even with Coronavirus.
Now, if you knew this false claim to have been false at the time you wrote this post, then it would have been a lie - you would have lied.

Notwithstanding you have been shown, multiple times, that there have been, so far this year, more than 300,000 excess deaths, we cannot assume that you understood that fact; or possibly, we have to leave open the possibility that you disbelieved the fact even though it came from the government department that tracks excess deaths.

But if you did accept that fact when it was previously rubbed in your face, then yes, this last post would have been an instance of you lying.  Which we cannot, of course, know as a fact.

kidv

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Re: coronavirus
« Reply #2480 on: October 30, 2020, 04:48:13 PM »
https://www.forbes.com/sites/niallmccarthy/2020/10/15/how-excess-mortality-in-2020-compares-infographic/?sh=7e2f2caf67a2

First link on google "2020 excess deaths" 


https://www.usnews.com/news/national-news/articles/2020-10-20/cdc-report-finds-nearly-300-000-excess-deaths-during-coronavirus-pandemic-with-jump-in-adults-aged-25-44

2nd link on google "2020 excess deaths."  Indicates U.S. is plus 300,000 excess deaths from all causes through October 2020.

That's Forbes and U.S. News and World Report, two bastions of partisan thought. /s/


wmLambert

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Re: coronavirus
« Reply #2481 on: October 30, 2020, 05:10:40 PM »
...so far this year, more than 300,000 excess deaths

I haven't followed the numbers too well as posted on this forum. I did note that the official stats are: "The crude death rate for Influenza and pneumonia for the 12-month period ending with 2020 Q1 was 16.0 (per 100,000), which is higher than the crude death rate of 15.2 for the 12-month period ending with 2019 Q1." Where does Coronavirus fit in this? Did the attribution of deaths due to other factors diminish? There are many experts that have decried the motivation of hospitals to get more funding if deaths are assigned to Covid-19 rather than to other co-morbidity factors. The family who couldn't collect the same insurance pay-out because a traffic death was labeled coronavirus was typical. Dr. Deborah Birx made that statement early on. The rules were changed, so the stats are moot.

DonaldD

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Re: coronavirus
« Reply #2482 on: October 30, 2020, 10:09:21 PM »
Ugh.

A 10,000 case increase reported today from yesterday, once again breaking the record just set one day ago.

It's almost certain that the new daily case count will exceed 100,000 by next Friday.
My bad.  The new daily case count busted through 100,000 today - it didn't wait for next week.  Worldometer is reporting 101,461 new cases in the past 24 hours, also raising the 7-day average above 80,000 to 80,593.

And there looks to be no likely turnaround on the horizon.  In fact, with election day on Tuesday, and Trump facilitating the spread of infection across the country with his rallies, I can only imagine what will happen 2 weeks from now.

DonaldD

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Re: coronavirus
« Reply #2483 on: October 30, 2020, 10:19:52 PM »
And here is what the last week has looked like in the USA:
Date            Day         New Cases   7-day average
2020-10-30   Friday      101461      80,593
2020-10-29   Thursday      91530      77,731
2020-10-28   Wednesday   81581      75323
2020-10-27   Tuesday      75976      72874
2020-10-26   Monday      69844      70999
2020-10-25   Sunday      63512      69441
2020-10-24   Saturday      80249      67739

TheDeamon

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Re: coronavirus
« Reply #2484 on: October 31, 2020, 05:16:41 PM »
https://www.forbes.com/sites/niallmccarthy/2020/10/15/how-excess-mortality-in-2020-compares-infographic/?sh=7e2f2caf67a2

First link on google "2020 excess deaths" 


https://www.usnews.com/news/national-news/articles/2020-10-20/cdc-report-finds-nearly-300-000-excess-deaths-during-coronavirus-pandemic-with-jump-in-adults-aged-25-44

2nd link on google "2020 excess deaths."  Indicates U.S. is plus 300,000 excess deaths from all causes through October 2020.

That's Forbes and U.S. News and World Report, two bastions of partisan thought. /s/

Thing is while "Excess deaths" can indicate other deaths from Covid19 itself that weren't diagnosed, they can also be excess deaths as a consequence of the mitigation efforts in response to covid19, ie: suicides as a consequence of economic disruption, elderly dying as they've lost in-person contact with their loved ones, etc.

msquared

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Re: coronavirus
« Reply #2485 on: October 31, 2020, 05:33:37 PM »
Yes, all deaths that were influenced by the existence of the virus. Maybe not directly attributed, but that probably would not have happened otherwise.

The retired owner of the company I have worked for for the past 26 years is a good example He was 83 and in fairly good health. Caught Covid and was dead in 2 weeks.

DonaldD

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Re: coronavirus
« Reply #2486 on: October 31, 2020, 10:13:23 PM »
And another record today - at 86,293 new daily cases, the highest Saturday count of the pandemic (6000 more than last week) almost 20,000 more than the peak Saturday in July, and the 7-day average today climbed by 1000 cases above yesterday's record.

Grant

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Re: coronavirus
« Reply #2487 on: November 01, 2020, 09:26:41 AM »
This might be my most favorite thread of all time.  I like to read the posts from February and March while playing with my nipples.  Mmmmmmmm. 

But there is some accounting in order. 

I was right about masks.  The CDC shot themselves in the foot by saying they don't help the hoi paloi though.  But I said that at the time. 

I was right, then wrong, then right about about asymptomatic transmission.  It all depends on the latest story or guidance.  The latest seems to be if you are not symptomatic that you really don't have it bad enough to spread it.  The biggest problem we seem to have is people recognizing when they are symptomatic or not. 

I was wrong on the idea that 'Rona could be airborne.  It seems it does have some ability to spread in aerosol form, but this is seemingly limited.  I was right that it was not as bad as the measels. 

I seem to have been wrong on the total number of deaths.  I can't find it but I think I predicted a pretty low number compared to where we are now.  I couldn't foresee the level of stupidity of millions of Americans or the inability of the Federal government to spread the most important information.  I underestimated Le Chattegrabber's ability to screw things up. 

I was wrong and right on the PPE shortage.  It lasted a little longer than I suspected it would.  It seems some producers were waiting for big fat government contracts before they started ramping up production.  But in the end, capitalism won, and we have all the PPE we could ever ask for. 

I'm still surprised that N95 masks are not popular and we're all sticking with surgical masks.  N95 is the way to go, peeps.  I could never imagine the stupidity of people complaining about low oxygen saturation levels. 

America has been a true superstar during this whole thing.  I must congratulate you all.  We are at possibly the most hardheaded, stupid, and stubborn of people.  Simultaneously the nation's commercial ability to produce needed materials and innovate testing seems outstanding.  If there is a hero in this story it is greedy CEOs and pharmaceutical companies creating vaccines. 

Where are we now?  Possibly at the last call for the 'Rona.  We're heading into the third wave, just in time for elections, just as I and the rest of Chase Manhattan planned.   Our plan worked beautifully.  You have to admit.  Don't underestimate the shareholders of Chase Manhattan.  The good news is that our third wave so far doesn't seem to be nearly as bad as what is happening in Europe right now, because we had a second wave during the summer and they didn't.  Viva la America. 

How bad the third wave will be is a good question.  It's not hitting everywhere as hard.  There doesn't seem to be a great deal of room for shutting things down again.  The mandatory mask laws are already in place but of course unenforceable except by Karens who like to fight other Karens.  We're not done dying, though. 

Vaccines should be out in February or March.  Go get one.  Or don't.  I don't care.  I'll be getting one.  This time next year the only people 'Rona will be killing is anti-vaxxers. 

Wear a mask.  Or don't.  I don't care.  I've tried. 

Don't get your news from Facebook.  Don't get news anywhere, in fact.  That's the best route. 

TheDrake

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Re: coronavirus
« Reply #2488 on: November 01, 2020, 09:50:12 AM »
This might be my most favorite thread of all time.  I like to read the posts from February and March while playing with my nipples.  Mmmmmmmm. 

But there is some accounting in order. 

I was right about masks.  The CDC shot themselves in the foot by saying they don't help the hoi paloi though.  But I said that at the time. 

I was right, then wrong, then right about about asymptomatic transmission.  It all depends on the latest story or guidance.  The latest seems to be if you are not symptomatic that you really don't have it bad enough to spread it.  The biggest problem we seem to have is people recognizing when they are symptomatic or not. 

I was wrong on the idea that 'Rona could be airborne.  It seems it does have some ability to spread in aerosol form, but this is seemingly limited.  I was right that it was not as bad as the measels. 

I seem to have been wrong on the total number of deaths.  I can't find it but I think I predicted a pretty low number compared to where we are now.  I couldn't foresee the level of stupidity of millions of Americans or the inability of the Federal government to spread the most important information.  I underestimated Le Chattegrabber's ability to screw things up. 

I was wrong and right on the PPE shortage.  It lasted a little longer than I suspected it would.  It seems some producers were waiting for big fat government contracts before they started ramping up production.  But in the end, capitalism won, and we have all the PPE we could ever ask for. 

I'm still surprised that N95 masks are not popular and we're all sticking with surgical masks.  N95 is the way to go, peeps.  I could never imagine the stupidity of people complaining about low oxygen saturation levels. 

America has been a true superstar during this whole thing.  I must congratulate you all.  We are at possibly the most hardheaded, stupid, and stubborn of people.  Simultaneously the nation's commercial ability to produce needed materials and innovate testing seems outstanding.  If there is a hero in this story it is greedy CEOs and pharmaceutical companies creating vaccines. 

Where are we now?  Possibly at the last call for the 'Rona.  We're heading into the third wave, just in time for elections, just as I and the rest of Chase Manhattan planned.   Our plan worked beautifully.  You have to admit.  Don't underestimate the shareholders of Chase Manhattan.  The good news is that our third wave so far doesn't seem to be nearly as bad as what is happening in Europe right now, because we had a second wave during the summer and they didn't.  Viva la America. 

How bad the third wave will be is a good question.  It's not hitting everywhere as hard.  There doesn't seem to be a great deal of room for shutting things down again.  The mandatory mask laws are already in place but of course unenforceable except by Karens who like to fight other Karens.  We're not done dying, though. 

Vaccines should be out in February or March.  Go get one.  Or don't.  I don't care.  I'll be getting one.  This time next year the only people 'Rona will be killing is anti-vaxxers. 

Wear a mask.  Or don't.  I don't care.  I've tried. 

Don't get your news from Facebook.  Don't get news anywhere, in fact.  That's the best route.

I could nickel and dime a couple of things. But I'd rather just tip my cap to you.

DonaldD

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Re: coronavirus
« Reply #2489 on: November 01, 2020, 10:00:23 PM »
And another record set... the highest Sunday count to-date, and the 7-day average bumped up by more than 1,000 from yesterday's record.

DonaldD

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Re: coronavirus
« Reply #2490 on: November 02, 2020, 09:34:25 PM »
88,900 new cases today - ~19,000 more cases than last Monday, meaning an increase in the 7-day average of 2700 daily cases to 86000.

DonaldD

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Re: coronavirus
« Reply #2491 on: November 03, 2020, 09:26:07 PM »
94,463 new cases today - a record for a Tuesday, the second most reported daily cases ever (2nd only to last Friday) and a new record for the 7-day average - 88,598 - an increase of 2,500 since yesterday.

TheDrake

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Re: coronavirus
« Reply #2492 on: November 03, 2020, 09:44:42 PM »
Just going to say, we all have access to that information, but thanks for the updates.

TheDrake

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Re: coronavirus
« Reply #2493 on: November 04, 2020, 09:44:17 PM »
I have potentially just been exposed to covid. One of my bubble people just came up positive, was at my house three days ago. Quarantine for two weeks, no symptoms for me at the moment. The person in question is symptomatic, but nothing seriously bad yet and he's 21 and in good health, so probably not bad. His Mom has some health issues, keeping my fingers crossed that she won't pick it up.

LetterRip

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Re: coronavirus
« Reply #2494 on: November 05, 2020, 04:31:30 AM »
I wish you luck and good health.

Personally I'd take plenty of vitamin D. Also I'd have lots of butter (butyrate), eggs w runny yolk (cholesterol), and salt.

If you want the theoretical benefits of HCQ you can drink green tea (EGCG) (a zinc ionosphore),


Grant

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Re: coronavirus
« Reply #2495 on: November 05, 2020, 09:11:17 AM »
Best of luck and best wishes to you, Drake.  I had a possible exposure through my daughter's daycare back in August.  Everything worked out fine, though. 

Just out of curiosity, was your contact closer than 5ft for greater than 15 minutes, and were they symptomatic at the time? 

TheDrake

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Re: coronavirus
« Reply #2496 on: November 05, 2020, 09:34:46 AM »
Best of luck and best wishes to you, Drake.  I had a possible exposure through my daughter's daycare back in August.  Everything worked out fine, though. 

Just out of curiosity, was your contact closer than 5ft for greater than 15 minutes, and were they symptomatic at the time?

Not symptomatic, about 4ft away for about an hour. Each day that I have no symptoms is a good sign. There were three or four others there and they also are fine so far.

Grant

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Re: coronavirus
« Reply #2497 on: November 05, 2020, 09:43:44 AM »
Not symptomatic, about 4ft away for about an hour. Each day that I have no symptoms is a good sign. There were three or four others there and they also are fine so far.

This sounds good.  The fact they were not symptomatic at the time of exposure is in your favor.  Stay safe. 

DonaldD

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Re: coronavirus
« Reply #2498 on: November 06, 2020, 07:31:20 AM »
Good luck with that, The Drake.

DonaldD

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Re: coronavirus
« Reply #2499 on: November 06, 2020, 03:22:16 PM »
OK, so the US is now in the worst shape it's ever been with respect to infections.  The past two days setting new records and, almost certainly, today following that trend.

Trump's COVID-palooza across the country over the past month has actually started showing up in increased case counts, and having an in-person election right at the very peak of infection rates is probably the worst possible timing ever.

With the election fallout taking up all the political oxygen over the next few weeks, there will be little focus left for the pandemic, and even less interest in urging stricter measures, even voluntary ones (and let's face it, there will be even stronger active resistance to common sense measures by those who feel disenfranchised by the election.)

And then, 3 weeks from now, just as the full effects of in-person voting start hitting infection rates, and with significant numbers of people having no interest in addressing the pandemic, Thanksgiving is going to hit.

It's almost a certainty that the country will be reporting more than 200,000 new daily cases by the middle of December, if not later this month.