Author Topic: Trump Response to Covid-19  (Read 12676 times)

yossarian22c

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Re: Trump Response to Covid-19
« Reply #300 on: April 01, 2020, 04:35:23 PM »
I view any investigation and study on what happened, preparedness etc if it helps us set up process and such so we might do things better in the future.
If it's about assigning blame I'm not interested.

Such a investigation should be nonpartisan and if the can come up with recommendations on how we can keep people safe without overly impacting the economy or medical system that would be great. Maybe even ask the hard questions.

Nonpartisan will only happen after the election. Which is unfortunate because we're going to be dealing with this for the next year+ (until vaccines are ready and the vaccination rate hits the 90% range). A nonpartisan commission that could work fast on next steps could be beneficial. I just have low expectations of either side of the house being able to pull that off. Maybe if they just panel a commission of epidemiologists and public health experts and keep the politicians away it could provide some benefit.

wmLambert

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Re: Trump Response to Covid-19
« Reply #301 on: April 01, 2020, 08:45:01 PM »
...Nonpartisan will only happen after the election. Which is unfortunate because we're going to be dealing with this for the next year+ (until vaccines are ready and the vaccination rate hits the 90% range). A nonpartisan commission that could work fast on next steps could be beneficial. I just have low expectations of either side of the house being able to pull that off. Maybe if they just panel a commission of epidemiologists and public health experts and keep the politicians away it could provide some benefit.

Two ways to look at your statement. There cannot be bipartisanship as long as the Democrats hold the House, or you think Trump must be broomed before bipartisanship would be allowed. The first, yes. The second, no.

yossarian22c

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Re: Trump Response to Covid-19
« Reply #302 on: April 01, 2020, 09:16:30 PM »
...Nonpartisan will only happen after the election. Which is unfortunate because we're going to be dealing with this for the next year+ (until vaccines are ready and the vaccination rate hits the 90% range). A nonpartisan commission that could work fast on next steps could be beneficial. I just have low expectations of either side of the house being able to pull that off. Maybe if they just panel a commission of epidemiologists and public health experts and keep the politicians away it could provide some benefit.

Two ways to look at your statement. There cannot be bipartisanship as long as the Democrats hold the House, or you think Trump must be broomed before bipartisanship would be allowed. The first, yes. The second, no.

I don’t think bipartisanship would happen in the house if republicans were in charge.

wmLambert

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Re: Trump Response to Covid-19
« Reply #303 on: April 01, 2020, 09:32:26 PM »
...I don’t think bipartisanship would happen in the house if republicans were in charge.

On the contrary, history shows that bipartisanship is almost a GOP foible. Bush 43 was so bipartisan that the Democrats thought he was "stealing" their party planks that they fought for for decades. They unilaterally withdrew all their members from Bush's bipartisan working groups. I can't see that paradigm shifting.

yossarian22c

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Re: Trump Response to Covid-19
« Reply #304 on: April 02, 2020, 09:03:52 AM »
...I don’t think bipartisanship would happen in the house if republicans were in charge.

On the contrary, history shows that bipartisanship is almost a GOP foible. Bush 43 was so bipartisan that the Democrats thought he was "stealing" their party planks that they fought for for decades. They unilaterally withdrew all their members from Bush's bipartisan working groups. I can't see that paradigm shifting.

The decrease in modern bipartisanship started with Gingrich and both sides have continued to play tit for tat and escalate animosities since then. Viewing bipartisanship as a purely republican trait ignores reality.

Seriati

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Re: Trump Response to Covid-19
« Reply #305 on: April 02, 2020, 03:06:59 PM »
The decrease in modern bipartisanship started with Gingrich and both sides have continued to play tit for tat and escalate animosities since then. Viewing bipartisanship as a purely republican trait ignores reality.

That's a bizarre misinterpretation of reality.

With limited exceptions the Democrats controlled both Houses of Congress from 1933 through 1995, often with fillabuster proof majorities in the Senate.  "Bipartisanship" during that period, meant nothing more than the Republicans being the swing vote between two oppossed factions of Democrats.

Gingrich came to be the Speaker of the House in 1995, and the Republicans got their first majorities in both houses that lasted for more than 2 years.  That's not the end of bipartisanship, its the beginning of the opportunity for it to exist. 

The fact that you see that as where it got worse speaks poorly of how the Democrats were no longer able to function when they were out of power.  The Republicans have not had a single fillabuster proof majority in that period.  Effectively, it shows that "bipartisan" before that point almost always meant the Republicans as the minority joining with a portion of the majority to effect a goal.

Edited to add:  After that point, it almost always meant a Republican Congress compromising with a Democratic administration to achieve a goal.  The Dems are far more interested in joining with a faction of the Republicans to prevent goals being achieved rather than to achieve them.
« Last Edit: April 02, 2020, 03:10:04 PM by Seriati »

TheDeamon

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Re: Trump Response to Covid-19
« Reply #306 on: April 02, 2020, 08:43:30 PM »
...I don’t think bipartisanship would happen in the house if republicans were in charge.

On the contrary, history shows that bipartisanship is almost a GOP foible. Bush 43 was so bipartisan that the Democrats thought he was "stealing" their party planks that they fought for for decades. They unilaterally withdrew all their members from Bush's bipartisan working groups. I can't see that paradigm shifting.

The decrease in modern bipartisanship started with Gingrich and both sides have continued to play tit for tat and escalate animosities since then. Viewing bipartisanship as a purely republican trait ignores reality.

That's a bizarre misinterpretation of reality.

It is partially correct however, add in a number of campaign finance reforms and few other things after 1994, and you see an enormous transfer of political fundraising power shift from the Candidates local area into the national organizations.

When your funding source is local, you're more responsive to local issues. When your funding source is national, such as your respective political party organizations, you end up toeing the party line rather than breaking ranks to better represent the people who voted you in(or didn't). The Democrats have that in spades when you look at the ones who broke ranks on Trump, among others. With one exception(Tulsi), the rest of them were representing very solidly Republican biased districts, so there was no way to dispute that doing anything other than what they did would likely cost them dearly in the General election.

TheDrake

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Re: Trump Response to Covid-19
« Reply #307 on: April 03, 2020, 05:54:27 PM »
Quote
A day after suggesting that it would soon change guidelines telling non-health workers not to wear face masks, the White House announced the new policy. “The CDC is recommending Americans wear a basic cloth or fabric mask,” Trump said in Friday’s coronavirus press briefing.

“This is voluntary. I don’t think I am going to be doing it,” he added, inexplicably discouraging the country from following the new health guidance meant to protect them from the deadly virus.

The cloth mask suggestion is a good one, keeping people from trying to get hold of surgical masks. It'll be interesting how many public officials lead by example. This is not at all an exclusive Trump question, add Schumer, Pelosi, and Schiff to the list if you like. I'll probably do it, assuming I can find or make something with what I've got on hand.

wmLambert

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Re: Trump Response to Covid-19
« Reply #308 on: April 03, 2020, 07:09:00 PM »
...It is partially correct however, add in a number of campaign finance reforms and few other things after 1994, and you see an enormous transfer of political fundraising power shift from the Candidates local area into the national organizations.

When Gingrich became majority leader, it was based on the Contract with America, in which the GOP pledged to bring issues to the floor for debate, which the Democrats never allowed to be raised. It was not to just pass bills, but to bring things in a bipartisanship manner to open debate, for the first time in decades. This is the definition of bipartisanship, not some kind of plot to put money in a federal trough rather than the grassroots.